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Pure Heroine

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Pure Heroine
Lorde Pure Heroine.png
Standard edition cover artwork; extended edition cover artwork is similar, but has the word "extended" beneath the title.
Studio album by Lorde
Released 27 September 2013 (2013-09-27)
Recorded 2012–13
Studio Golden Age
(Morningside, New Zealand)
Genre
Length 37:08
Label
Producer Joel Little
Lorde chronology
Tennis Court EP
(2013)Tennis Court EP2013
Pure Heroine
(2013)
Melodrama
(2017)Melodrama2017
Singles from Pure Heroine
  1. "Royals"
    Released: 3 June 2013 (2013-06-03T03)
  2. "Tennis Court"
    Released: 7 June 2013 (2013-06-07T03)
  3. "Team"
    Released: 13 September 2013 (2013-09-13T03)
  4. "Glory and Gore"
    Released: 11 March 2014 (2014-03-11T03)

Pure Heroine is the debut studio album by New Zealand singer Lorde, which was released through Universal, Lava, and Republic Records on 27 September 2013. After several unsuccessful sessions with songwriters, Lorde was paired with Joel Little by A&R representative Scott Maclachlan, who assisted with the album's production. Recording took place at Golden Age Studios in Auckland. Pure Heroine has been described as a dream pop, electronica and electropop album with minimalist production, deep bass and programmed beats.

The album received positive reviews from most critics, many of whom praised its songwriting, production, and Lorde's vocal delivery. It appeared on several year-end critics' lists, and was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards. Pure Heroine deals with themes of youth and critiques mainstream culture, exploring wealth, fame, consumer culture and social status. The album is known for its impact and influence on contemporary pop music and its challenge to modern-day artists.

Lorde released Pure Heroine's lead single, "Royals", to critical and commercial success; it was followed by "Tennis Court", "Team" and "Glory and Gore". The album debuted at number three on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling 129,000 album-equivalent units, and topped the charts in 12 other markets. Pure Heroine was one of 2014's best-selling albums. It was certified platinum in the United Kingdom, double platinum in Canada and triple platinum in Australia and the United States, selling more than three million copies worldwide.[1]

Background and development[edit]

Since she was 14 years old, Lorde worked with Universal to develop her sound and artistic vision. She was signed to Universal by her manager, Scott Maclachlan, at age 13 and was paired with a succession of songwriters in unsuccessful attempts to develop her own music.[2] Maclachlan told HitQuarters, "Fundamentally I think she understood that she was going to write her own music but would need someone to help with the production side of it."[2] Lorde began writing songs on guitar at the age of "13 or 14".[3][4] She was eventually paired with New Zealand writer and producer Joel Little, and their working relationship clicked almost immediately.[2] Lorde's debut extended play (2013's The Love Club EP) was praised by music critics, who compared the EP to work by other female alternative pop artists such as Sky Ferreira, Florence + the Machine, Lana Del Rey, and Grimes.[5] It reached number one in New Zealand, number two in Australia (where it was certified five times platinum for shipments of 350,000 copies),[6] and number twenty-three on the US Billboard 200.[7][8]

Before beginning work on Pure Heroine, Lorde said that she intended her debut album to be a "cohesive" work.[3] Like The Love Club EP, Pure Heroine was recorded with producer Joel Little at Golden Age Studios in Auckland.[9] Initially, Lorde and Little played demos to A&R Scott Maclachlan in which they discussed songs, exchanged comments and changed aspects of the songs.[10] She later showed the lyrics to boyfriend James Lowe, saying that sharing things with her boyfriend encouraged much of the album's writing and inspired her to write most of the album.[11] Recording of the album was overseen by Lorde and Little, and was described by Maclachlan as a fairly-short process; most of what Lorde played for him ended up on the album.[10] Recording took place in Auckland's Golden Age Studios (a small studio without expensive technology), and was completed in less than a year.[10] Lorde wanted to write her own music, and the album's content was co-written with Little.[12] Ten songs were included in the album's final track listing, with seven or eight tracks not making the cut.[10] Choosing songs to include on the final track listing, Lorde and Maclachlan decided to keep it at ten to avoid "filler material."[10]

Music and lyrics[edit]

Florence Welch, in a mustard-yellow-and-white outfit, singing passionately into a microphone
Lana Del Rey, with light-brown hair in an olive-colored shirt, smiling towards the camera at a fan meet
Pure Heroine was compared to the works of female artists such as Florence Welch (left) and Lana Del Rey.[13]

Lorde's vocals on Pure Heroine have been noted for her range and powerful delivery.[14][15] She said that she felt it essential for her voice to be the album's focus, since she was unfamiliar with playing instruments.[16] The A.V. Club editor Kevin McFarland called the singer's voice the "alpha and omega of her talent. She has the presence and vocal development of singers more than twice her age. Her voice isn't booming or overpowering, but rather mystifying and alluring, both floating on its own in a sea of reverb and digital blips and awash in an army of chorused overdubs."[17] According to Annie Barrett of Entertainment Weekly, Lorde's voice is "way beyond her years" while Billboard noted her vocals for being "smoky and restrained".[18][15]

The album is built around Little's production, which incorporates deep bass, loops, and programmed beats.[15] During its recording, Lorde said that she "didn't really have a specific sound in mind". She cited James Blake and minimalist music as the main inspirations for Pure Heroine.[19][20] The album's song structures were influenced by hip hop, electronic and pop music as the singer listened to those genres to develop a "real taste" of the direction the production would follow.[19] Several publications noted its minimalist production, and compared its arrangements to singers such as Robyn and Santigold.[21][22] Pure Heroine has been described by critics as an electronica,[23] dream pop[24] and electropop[25] album.

It deals with youth and critiques mainstream culture,[26][27][28] exploring wealth,[29] fame,[25] consumer culture and social status.[30][27] Classic teen-pop themes such as social anxiety, romance,[31] and "adolescent aggrievance and angst" are also present on the album.[32] According to NME, its lyrics indicate that Lorde is "bored".[33] In an interview with the magazine, she said that she used words of inclusion (such as "we" and "us") throughout the album.[34] The singer's lyrics detail "the mundanity of teenage life" and celebrate the "often ignored intelligence of the next generation."[26] Lorde also uses metaphors involving teeth, describing the "Hollywood smile",[26] which several publications related to social class structures and economic inequality.[27] In an analysis piece from i-D, writer Wendy Syfret states that Pure Heroine presented suburban dreams and a realistic teenage life, saying the record is "perhaps the most direct and eloquent statement about the eternal teen juxtaposition of wanting it all, feeling desperate to grow up and start life, but knowing deep down that to leave this stage is to make an exit you can never undo."[35]

Songs[edit]

Tracks 1–5[edit]

External image
The 1976 photograph of baseball player George Brett by photographer Ted Spiegel that inspired Lorde to write "Royals".[36]

The album's opening track, "Tennis Court", addresses Lorde's new fame[37][38] and criticises the "high life."[39] Described by critics as a downtempo hip hop and EDM-influenced alternative pop, art pop and electropop song,[40][41] it uses synthesisers and electronic pulses in its arrangement.[42][43][44] Little and Lorde first wrote the music and beat, and the lyrics were written later.[45] Nick Messtite of Forbes compared the track to the Postal Service's 2003 song "The District Sleeps Alone Tonight".[46] "400 Lux" (named for the brightness of a sunset) was interpreted by critics as the album's first love song, with lyrics detailing suburban life. Lipshutz of Billboard described its instrumentation as "over canyon-sized bass and popping percussion".[15]

Lorde wrote the lyrics to "Royals" in half an hour, and recorded the song within a week during a school break.[47][48] She was inspired after seeing a photo by Ted Spiegel in the July 1976 issue of National Geographic of Kansas City Royals player George Brett signing baseballs, with his team name (Royals) emblazoned across his shirt. Although Lorde was also inspired by historic aristocrats and hip hop-influenced artists such as Jay-Z, Kanye West and Lana Del Rey when writing the song, she criticised their "bullshit" references to "expensive" alcohol and cars.[49] Lorde cited her fear of ageing and a party she threw at her house while her parents were away as the main inspirations behind "Ribs",[50][51] described by critics as a deep house-influenced electronica and electropop song.[52][53] "Buzzcut Season", influenced by tropical music,[54] has "light percussive snaps" and "trickling xylophone" instrumentation.[54] Its lyrics, describing the "ridiculousness of modern life",[55] include themes of refuge and reassurance.[30]

Tracks 6–10[edit]

The album's sixth song, "Team", is a hybrid alternative pop[40] and electro-hop[56] song which features synthesiser,[15] bass,[57] and snare drum instrumentation over a handclap-based beat.[58][59][60] Written when Lorde was traveling the world, the song was a "tribute to her friends and country".[42][61] Lily Rothman wrote for Time that the lyrics "we sure know how to run things" in "Team" were a response to "We run things, things don’t run we" from Miley Cyrus' "We Can't Stop" (2013).[62] The next song, "Glory and Gore" is a chillwave and hip hop-influenced electropop ballad[63][64] with pulsing synthesisers.[65] Lorde uses black satire throughout the song to express disdain for the modern emphasis on violence,[56][15] and compares celebrity culture to gladiatorial combat.[21] PopMatters' Evan Sawdey described it as a "dark" version of Katy Perry's "Roar" (2013).[66]

"Still Sane" is a spare ballad, with lyrics grappling with "[Lorde's] ambition and fears of how fame will affect her."[38] Critics called her vocals on the track "haunting".[26] "White Teeth Teens", influenced by doo-wop music, incorporates military-style drums with lyrics detailing the differences between the appearance and true character of a white-toothed teen.[15] Its chords were compared to early work by Vampire Weekend.[67] In a PopMatters analysis, Scott Interrante describes the use of teeth in the song's lyrics as "preppy, popular teens, using their white teeth as their defining characteristic."[27] "A World Alone", the album's closing track, was described as a "dark disco diamond".[68] It begins with a "lonely guitar note" before transitioning into a "roaring dance beat".[69][15] The song's final line, "Let 'em talk", was cited by critics as a call and response to the album's opening line, "Don't you think that its boring how people talk?" in "Tennis Court".[37]

Promotion[edit]

Lorde posted the album's release date along with its cover art and track listing to her Twitter account on 12 August 2013.[70] The album's release was preceded by an advertising campaign which had the lyrics of her songs displayed on buses and shop windows and faxed to media outlets.[71] On 23 September 2013, "Buzzcut Season" was released as a promotional single in several iTunes Stores in Asia.[72][73] "Ribs" was subsequently offered as the free single of the week on the iTunes Store during the week of the album's release.[74] An extended version of the album was released on 13 December 2013, featuring "No Better" (previously released as a free promotional single)[75][76] and five tracks from The Love Club EP: "Bravado", "Million Dollar Bills", "The Love Club", "Biting Down" and "Swingin Party".

To promote the album, Lorde did several performances worldwide.[70] She made her first televised performance in the United States on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, performing "Royals" and "White Teeth Teens".[77] Lorde replaced Frank Ocean, who cancelled due to illness, at the 2013 Splendour in the Grass Festival.[78] In September 2013, Lorde appeared on New Zealand's 3rd Degree[79] and performed on Later... with Jools Holland.[80][81] Two months later, Lorde performed several songs from the album and her EP on Live with Letterman[82] and at a concert the singer held at the Warsaw Venue in Brooklyn.[83] She further promoted the album by performing "Royals" on The Ellen DeGeneres Show on 9 October 2013.[84] The singer also performed "Team" at the 2013 ARIA Awards[85] and opened the 2013 New Zealand Music Awards with "Royals".[86] At the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, Lorde performed a stripped down version of the song; the performance received praise from rapper Mac Miller and Chrissy Teigen.[87]

Tour[edit]

The album received further promotion from her first headlining concert tour, the Pure Heroine Tour, which started on 28 July 2013 in Byron Bay, Australia.[88] It was Lorde's first concert tour with North American shows in August,[89] followed by two dates in Europe.[90] The singer returned to North America to perform in eight additional shows before flying to Australia for six shows. In 2014, Lorde performed an additional 40 shows in North America, 19 in Asia, 6 in Europe and 3 in South America.[91][92] 9 Oceania dates were cancelled; one due to scheduling conflict and 8 for a chest infection she was diagnosed with.[93][94]

The set list consisted of songs from The Love Club EP and Pure Heroine.[95] Lorde appeared on stage with new outfits to accommodate the mood of the songs.[96] The singer performed most of her songs in a silhouette; her face was frequently hidden from the crowd.[97] She also premiered an unreleased song called "Good Fights".[98] It received positive critical reception with critics complementing her vocal clarity, stage presence and minimalist setting.[99]

Singles[edit]

Lorde performing at the Boston Calling Music Festival.

"Royals" was released as the album's lead single on 3 June 2013, through digital distribution.[100] The song received widespread acclaim with reviewers complimenting its minimalist production and lyrics.[101] It achieved commercial success by topping the charts in New Zealand,[102] Canada,[103] the Republic of Ireland,[104] the United Kingdom and the United States.[105] She became the youngest artist to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart since Tiffany's "I Think We're Alone Now" (1987) and the first New Zealand act to reach number one as a lead artist.[106][107] The song received three Grammy nominations in the categories of Record of the Year, and won for Song of the Year and Best Pop Solo Performance.[108]

"Tennis Court" was released as the second single from the album.[109] It was also well-received from critics, most of whom praised the song's production and musical style.[110] To promote the song, Lorde released an accompanying EP, Tennis Court EP, released through digital stores in the United Kingdom on 7 June 2013 (due to the timezone difference) and physically on 22 June 2013.[111][112] It performed modestly on international charts, debuting at number one in New Zealand[113] and charting in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.[114][115]

"Team" was announced as the third single from the album.[116] It was leaked by Australian radio station Triple J on 12 September and as a result, the single was released digitally in Australia and New Zealand on 13 September.[117][118][119] The single became available in the United States on 13 September as part of the pre-order for Pure Heroine.[120] The song was critically acclaimed by critics who praised its catchy production and "club-ready" atmosphere.[38][25] "Team" was a commercial success, reaching the top 10 in New Zealand,[121] Canada,[122] Mexico,[123] and the United States.[122]

"Glory and Gore" was released as the album's fourth and final single on 11 March 2014 after being sent to US modern rock radio.[124] The song received mixed reviews. Some praised its hook while others criticized its forced lyrics and production.[15][25] It failed to match the success of the previous singles, charting outside the top 10 in New Zealand,[125] and at low-tier positions in Australia and the United States.[126][127]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
SourceRating
AnyDecentMusic?7.6/10[128]
Metacritic79/100[129]
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3/5 stars[32]
The A.V. ClubB+[130]
Entertainment WeeklyA−[131]
The Guardian4/5 stars[68]
The Independent3/5 stars[132]
NME6/10[33]
Pitchfork7.3/10[133]
Q4/5 stars[134]
Rolling Stone4/5 stars[13]
Spin6/10[135]

The album received generally positive reviews from music critics, many of whom praised its songwriting, production, and Lorde's vocal delivery. At the review-aggregate site Metacritic, Pure Heroine has an average score of 79 out of 100 based on 28 reviews (indicating "generally favorable" reviews).[129] Jason Lipshutz of Billboard gave the album a score of 94, describing it as "immaculate" and calling Lorde "the most vocally striking and lyrically thought-provoking" artist of recent times. Lipshutz called Pure Heroine "honest and addictive", and wrote that "the age of Lorde" had begun.[15] Tom Cardy of The Dominion Post gave the album 4 out of 5 stars and wrote that although it was not "ground-breaking" and didn't offer any "surprises", it was a "pure gold" follow-up to The Love Club and a "strong" debut album.[136]

According to Lydia Jenkin of The New Zealand Herald, Pure Heroine contained "lyrical genius" and "endlessly appealing melodies." Jenkin wrote that although the album did not offer any surprises, Lorde was the "new pop heroine."[137] In a mixed review, Spin's Maura Johnston said that Lorde used "her age as some sort of clumsy ploy"; "the music is aggressively okay", but the singer was bathed in "(possibly fake) teen-pop-star ennui".[135] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic gave Pure Heroine three out of five stars, saying that Lorde's persona on the album "may be an act" and the singer was dishonest on the record. Erlewine called Lorde's music derivative and compared her to Lana Del Rey, but praised the singer's style and "potential."[32]

Adam Offitzer of Pretty Much Amazing gave Pure Heroine a B grade, calling the album "no masterpiece" and its middle tracks purposeless, but engaging enough to keep Lorde relevant.[67] Pitchfork's Lindsay Zoladz wrote that Lorde "achieves a tricky balancing act of exposing irony and even hypocrisy without coming off as preachy or moralistic," implying that the music deflates pompous characters.[133] Evan Sawdey of PopMatters called Pure Heroine "a lush, engaging experience. Lorde's sudden international success is most welcome in such an overcrowded, singles-oriented marketplace as we have today."[138] Robert Christgau gave the album a two-star honourable mention ((2-star Honorable Mention)) and quipped, "Her ambition's in the right place, but the reason she always co-writes is that 16-year-olds don't just crank out hits."[139]

Accolades[edit]

Pure Heroine appeared on several year-end top-albums lists. Several publications, including The New York Times,[140] FasterLouder,[141] The Herald Sun and the San Jose Mercury News called it 2013's best album;[142] Rolling Stone called it the year's best debut album.[143] It was voted the 25th-best album in The Village Voice's Pazz & Jop critics' poll for 2013, with a score of 317 points.[144] "Royals" was number two on the Pazz & Jop's singles list, behind Daft Punk's "Get Lucky".[145] Metacritic ranked it the fifth-most-prominent record of 2013, with 34 points.[146]

Idolator,[147] Slant,[148] Billboard,[149] Rolling Stone,[28] The A.V. Club,[150] and Clash[151] included Pure Heroine on their year-end top-ten lists. Other publications which regarded the album highly included The Guardian,[152] musicOMH,[153] Time Out,[154] Digital Spy,[155] American Songwriter,[156] Pigeons & Planes,[157] Paste,[158] Consequence of Sound[159] and PopMatters.[160] Billboard ranked it 16th on their list of "The 20 Best Albums of 2010s (So Far)",[161] but Vice called it 2013's worst album.[162] Pure Heroine was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards. "Royals" won two Grammys (Song of the Year and Best Pop Solo Performance),[163] and was nominated for Record of the Year.[164] Lorde was the youngest New Zealander to win a Grammy, and the third-youngest performer overall.[165][166] Pure Heroine was also nominated for the Taite Music Prize, an annual award for the country's best album from Independent Music New Zealand.[167]

Commercial performance[edit]

The album debuted atop the Official New Zealand Chart, and was certified platinum in its first week;[168] it remained at number one for the following two weeks.[169][170] After eleven weeks on the chart, Pure Heroine rebounded to number two and was certified triple platinum.[171] At week eighteen, it rose from number three to number one and was certified quadruple platinum.[172] The album also debuted at number one on Australia's ARIA Chart.[173] It then fell to number two, but was certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA).[174] The album was ninth on ARIA's 10 Albums of 2013, with sales of about 100,000 copies.[175]

Pure Heroine entered the Canadian Albums Chart at number two, with first-week sales of 15,000 copies, and was later certified platinum by Music Canada (MC) for shipments of 80,000 copies.[176][177] The album sold 18,294 copies in its debut at number four on the Official Charts Company's UK Albums Chart, where it was later certified gold by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) for shipments of 100,000 copies.[178][179]

It debuted at number three on the US Billboard 200, with first-week sales of 129,000 copies.[180] In its second week on the chart the album fell to number six, with a 51-percent drop in sales to 63,000 copies.[181] Pure Heroine fell to number seven in its third week, selling 48,000 copies, but rose to number five the following week and sold 40,000 copies.[182][183] According to Nielsen Soundscan, the album sold 413,000 copies by 3 December 2013; by 19 December, it was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for sales of 541,000 copies.[184][185] Pure Heroine had a 14-percent US sales increase during the holiday season, selling 78,000 copies and moving from number eleven to number seven on the Billboard 200.[186] On 9 January 2014, the album rose from seventh to fifth on the chart and sold a further 46,000 copies; it held its position the following week, selling 33,000 copies.[187][188] In July 2014, Billboard released a mid-year chart; Pure Heroine was number four, selling 641,000 copies in the first half of the year.[189] It was the sixth-bestselling album of 2014, selling 841,000 copies and 6.8 million tracks.[190][191]

Pure Heroine had an 86-percent increase in sales after Lorde's performance at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, rising from number five back to number three on the Billboard 200 and selling 68,000 copies.[192] After slipping to number eight for the week ending 19 February, "Pure Heroine" rose to number seven with 39,000 copies sold (a nine-percent increase).[193] It rose to number six the following week, selling 30,000 copies and passing the one-million mark with 1.01 million copies sold.[194] Pure Heroine was the first debut album to reach the one-million mark since October 2013; Lorde was the first woman whose debut album sold a million copies since April 2011 and Adele's 19.[194] According to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), the album sold 1.4 million copies in 2013[195] and two million copies in 2014.[196]

Impact[edit]

A young girl comes out of nowhere, holding her own against all the Dr. Lukes and Mileys and [Rihannas] of the world while maintaining control and integrity in the process. It's a story we haven't seen since…Adele, way back in 2011, when she released her own album marketed off a particular brand of virtuosity and youth (the ubiquitous 21).

Forbes, about Pure Heroine's challenge to pop music.[197]

The album was praised for its genres and take on pop and for challenging present-day music and its performers, including artists such as Miley Cyrus and Rihanna.[21] According to Clash, the "popularity of Pure Heroine suggests all is not lost. It says there's still an intellectual, polished and important place for pop, that doesn't rely on open letters, open legs, Twitter, twerking and obscenely desperate electro hooks. Whether the burgeoning pressure of becoming a star will get the better of Lorde, we'll undoubtedly find out. But for now, she is most definitely our 'queen bee'."[21] English singer-songwriter David Bowie called her "the future of music".[198]

Forbes placed Lorde on their '30 Under 30' list of young people "who are changing our world".[199] She was the youngest person in the music category: "New Zealand's biggest star has rocketed to mainstream acclaim with debut album Pure Heroine and unexpected hit 'Royals'. She's already cashing in with a (US) $2.5 million publishing deal, and more is undoubtedly on the way."[199] Lorde also topped Time's list of the world's most influential teenagers; according to Time, she was "forging her own path."[199] Forbes called Pure Heroine a "breakout success", with a "larger evolution on the horizon."[197] Billboard also named Lorde "your new alt-rock heroine" in their September 2013 cover story.[200]

Several publications have cited Pure Heroine for ushering a new sound in mainstream music.[201][202][203] According to Lindsay Zoladz from The Ringer, Pure Heroine's "impact is larger and harder to define because it completely rewrote the rules for young women making radio-friendly pop." She further commented that the ripple effects of the album can be heard in other new young artists such as Alessia Cara, Daya and Halsey.[204] The New Yorker's Carrie Battan echoed similar statements, saying: "It’s difficult to say whether Lorde initiated a sea change or merely foresaw one, but the pop scene—particularly for women—has altered radically since “Pure Heroine” was released. It is almost unrecognizable from the sugary-sweet, overtly sexual realm of the early aughts." Battan also expressed that other pop artists such as Cyrus, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry and Taylor Swift have altered their image or sound to adjust to the changes in mainstream music since the album's release.[205]

Several critics noted that Lorde's vocal performance on Pure Heroine led to the rise of "whisperpop" in mainstream music.[206] According to Peter Robinson of The Guardian, Lana Del Rey and Lorde inspired a "raft of major signings". An unnamed source commented to the publication, "When I was signed it was just after Lorde too, so labels were wanking over trying to get loads of girls who were like her.”[206] Elle Hunt, writing for The Spinoff, stated that an artist can achieve a hit in 2017 by taking the "gated reverb" of songs such as "Team" or "Tennis Court", making them minor key and simplifying its production. Hunt finished by stating that the album's "almost conversational style of singing is now so ubiquitous, it’s easy to forget it would not have been associated with pop ten years ago or fewer."[207]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Ella Yelich O'Connor and Joel Little, and produced by Little, except where noted.

Pure Heroine – Standard version
No.TitleLength
1."Tennis Court"3:18
2."400 Lux"3:54
3."Royals"3:10
4."Ribs"4:18
5."Buzzcut Season" (additional production by Yelich O'Connor)4:06
6."Team" (additional production by Yelich O'Connor)3:13
7."Glory and Gore"3:30
8."Still Sane"3:08
9."White Teeth Teens"3:36
10."A World Alone" (additional production by Yelich O'Connor)4:54
Total length:37:08

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the liner notes of Pure Heroine.[210]

  • Ella Yelich O'Connor – vocals, additional production (tracks 5, 6 and 10)
  • Joel Little – production, mixing, engineering, instrumentation
  • Stuart Hawkes – mastering
  • Charles Howells – photography
  • Mario Hugo – design, illustration
  • Ania Nowak – design support

Charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Australia (ARIA)[267] 3× Platinum 210,000^
Austria (IFPI Austria)[268] Platinum 15,000*
Brazil (ABPD)[269] Platinum 90,000*
Canada (Music Canada)[270] 2× Platinum 160,000^
Colombia (ASINCOL)[271] Platinum 10,000*
Denmark (IFPI Denmark)[272] Gold 10,000^
France (SNEP)[273] Gold 50,000*
Germany (BVMI)[274] Gold 100,000^
Mexico (AMPROFON)[275] Gold 30,000^
New Zealand (RMNZ)[276] 5× Platinum 75,000^
Norway (IFPI Norway)[277] Platinum 30,000*
Poland (ZPAV)[278] Gold 10,000*
South Korea None 1,198[279]
Sweden (GLF)[280] Gold 20,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[281] Platinum 300,000^
United States (RIAA)[282] 3× Platinum 1,700,000[283]
Summaries
Worldwide 4,000,000[284]

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

Release history[edit]

Region Date Format(s) Edition(s) Label
Australia[285] 27 September 2013
  • CD
  • digital download
Standard Universal
New Zealand[286]
South Korea[287] 30 September 2013 Digital download
United States[288]
  • CD
  • digital download
Germany[289] 25 October 2013 Universal
Ireland[290] Virgin EMI
South Korea[291] 28 October 2013 CD Universal
United Kingdom[292]
  • CD
  • digital download
Virgin EMI
Germany[293] 1 November 2013 LP Universal
United Kingdom[294] 11 November 2013 Virgin EMI
Australia[295] 15 November 2013 Universal
New Zealand[296]
United States[297] 19 November 2013
  • Lava
  • Republic
Taiwan[298]
  • CD
  • digital download
Universal
Canada[299] 13 December 2013 Digital download Extended
United States[300]
Australia[301] 16 December 2013
Belgium[302]
Finland[303]
Germany[304]
Spain[305]
Switzerland[306]
Japan[307] 19 February 2014
  • CD
  • digital download
Standard Universal

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c "Interview with Scott MacLachlan". HitQuarters. 21 January 2014. Retrieved 22 January 2014.
  3. ^ a b White, Caitlin (21 May 2013). "Taking Flight: 16-Year-Old Ella Yelich-O'Connor vs. Lorde, Popstar". Pigeons and Planes. Retrieved 18 August 2013.
  4. ^ White, Caitlin (5 October 2013). "NZ newest pop star". Tom Cardy. Retrieved 8 November 2013.
  5. ^ Christopher Monger, James. "The Love Club EP – Lorde". AllMusic. Retrieved 7 September 2013.
  6. ^ "ARIA Singles Chart – 02/09/2013". Australian Recording Industry Association. 31 August 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2013.
  7. ^ Lorde – Chart history: Billboard 200. Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 7 September 2013.
  8. ^ Caulfield, Keith (16 August 2013). "Chart Moves: Lorde's 'Love' Rises, Cody Simpson Surges, the Supremes Return to Billboard 200". Billboard. Retrieved 19 August 2013.
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