Pirog

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Pyrog)
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Pirog (disambiguation).
Pirog
Fish pie.JPG
A fish pirog
Alternative names Pyrih, pyrog
Place of origin Russia, Ukraine, Belarus
Cookbook: Pirog  Media: Pirog

Pirog (Russian: пиро́г; IPA: [pʲɪˈrok], pl. pirogi пироги [pʲirɐˈɡʲi]; Belarusian: піро́г; Northern Sami: pirog; Latvian: pīrāgs pl. pīrāgi; Ukrainian: пиріг pyrih, pl. pyrohy пироги) is a baked case of dough with a sweet or savoury filling.[1][2] Pirogi are common in Eastern European cuisines. Pirogi are characterised as "the most popular and important dish"[3] and "truly national goods"[4] of Russian cuisine, "ubiquitous in Russian life".[1]

The name is derived from the ancient Proto-Slavic word pir, meaning "banquet" or "festivity".[4][5][6] The Russian plural pirogi with the stress on the last syllable should not be confused with pierogi (stress on "o" in Polish and English) in Polish cuisine, which are similar to the Russian pelmeni or Ukrainian varenyky.

Shape[edit]

Pirogi come in different shapes and forms: they are often oblong with tapering ends, but can also be circular or rectangular.[1][7] They can be closed or open-faced with no crust on top.[7]

Dough[edit]

Pirogi are usually made from yeast-raised dough[4][7] which distinguishes them from pies and pasties common in other cuisines.[4] In former times, the dough for Russian pirogi was made predominantly of rye flour. Later it was mixed with wheat flour. Nowadays, mainly wheat flour is used.[4]

Тhere are also variants made from shortcrust, flaky or puff pastry. In East-Slavic languages pirog is a generic term which denotes virtually any kind of pie, pasty, or cake. Тhus, Karelian pasty (known as Karelian pirog in Russian), knish or charlotte are considered types of pirog in Eastern Europe.

Filling[edit]

The filling for pirogi may be sweet and contain quark or cottage cheese, fruits like apples, plums or various berries, as well as honey, nuts or poppy seeds. Savoury versions may consist of meat, fish, mushrooms, cabbage, rice, buckwheat groats or potato. In Ukrainian and Russian cuisines, pyrohy (as well as their smaller versions called pirozhki) with a savoury filling are traditionally served as an accompaniment with clear borscht, broth or consommé.[7]

Types[edit]

Certain types of pirog are known by different names:

  • Coulibiac, a middle-size Russian pirog of oblong shape with a complex filling;[8]
  • Kurnik ("chicken pirog"), also known as wedding pirog or tsar pirog, a dome-shaped savoury Russian pirog, usually filled with chicken, eggs, onions, kasha or rice, and other optional components;[9][10]
  • Poppy seed roll and nut roll, popular throughout Central and Eastern Europe, are considered types of pirog in Eastern Europe;
  • Pirozhki (Russian diminutive, literally "small pirogi") or pyrizhky (Ukrainian), individual-sized buns that can be eaten with one hand;[1]
  • Rasstegai ("unbuttoned pirog"), a type of Russian pirog with a hole in the top;[11]
  • Shanga, a small or medium-size open-faced circular savoury pirog, widespread in Ural and Siberia;[12]
  • Vatrushka, a small sweet pirog, popular in all Eastern Slavic cuisines, formed as a ring of dough with quark in the middle.[13][14]

Similar West Slavic pastries, such as Czech and Slovak Kolach, and Polish Kołacz, usually have sweet fillings.

Gallery[edit]

Varieties
Designs

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Darra Goldstein. A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality, "Russian pies", p.54. Russian Information Service, 1999, ISBN 978-1880100677
  2. ^ Вильям Похлебкин. Кулинарный словарь, Пироги. Москва: Центрполиграф, 2007, ISBN 978-5-9524-3170-6 (William Pokhlyobkin. The Culinary Dictionary, "Pirogi". Moscow: Centrpoligraph, 2007; in Russian)
  3. ^ Леонид Беловинский. Энциклопедический словарь российской жизни и истории: XVIII-начало XX в., стр. 557, Пирог (Leonid Belovinskiy. The encyclopedic dictionary of Russian life and history: from the 18th to the beginning of the 20th centurym p. 557, "Pirog"; in Russian)
  4. ^ a b c d e Вильям Похлебкин. Большая энциклопедия кулинарного искусства, Пироги русские. Москва: Центрполиграф, 2010, ISBN 978-5-9524-4620-5 (William Pokhlyobkin. The Great Encyclopedia of Culinary Art, "Russian pirogi". Moscow: Centrpoligraph, 2010; in Russian)
  5. ^ Max Vasmer. Russisches etymologisches Wörterbuch. Winter. Heidelberg, 1953–1958 (in German); Пирог (in Russian)
  6. ^ Etymological dictionary of Ukrainian language (2003), vol 4. (in Ukrainian), Naukova Dumka, Kiev. ISBN 966-00-0590-3(4)
  7. ^ a b c d Stechishin, S. (1989). Traditional Ukrainian Cookery. Trident Press, Canada. ISBN 0-919490-36-0
  8. ^ Madison Books; Andrews McMeel Publishing (1 November 2007). 1,001 Foods to Die For. Andrews McMeel Publishing. p. 280. ISBN 978-0-7407-7043-2. Retrieved 8 February 2011. 
  9. ^ Вильям Похлебкин. Кулинарный словарь, Курник. Москва: Центрполиграф, 2007, ISBN 978-5-9524-3170-6 (William Pokhlyobkin. The Culinary Dictionary, "Kurnik". Moscow: Centrpoligraph, 2007)
  10. ^ Леонид Зданович. Кулинарный словарь, Курник. Москва: Вече, 2001, ISBN 5-7838-0923-3 (Leonid Zdanovich. Culinary dictionary, "Kurnik". Moscow: Veche, 2001; in Russian)
  11. ^ Леонид Зданович. Кулинарный словарь, Расстегай. Москва: Вече, 2001, ISBN 5-7838-0923-3 (Leonid Zdanovich. Culinary dictionary, "Rasstegai". Moscow: Veche, 2001; in Russian)
  12. ^ Max Vasmer. Russisches etymologisches Wörterbuch. Winter. Heidelberg, 1953–1958 (in German); Шаньга (in Russian)
  13. ^ Ekaterina and Lludmila Bylinka (2011). Home Cooking From Russia: A Collection of Traditional, Yet Contemporary Recipes. Authorhouse. p. 94. ISBN 9781467041362. 
  14. ^ Леонид Зданович. Кулинарный словарь, Ватрушка. Москва: Вече, 2001, ISBN 5-7838-0923-3 (Leonid Zdanovich. Culinary dictionary, "Vatrushka". Moscow: Veche, 2001; in Russian)