Python Conference

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The closing panel of the 2010 PyCon Asia Pacific held at the Singapore Management University

The Python Conference (also called PyCon[1]: 564 ) is the largest[2][3] annual convention for the discussion and promotion of the Python programming language.[4][5] It originated in the United States but is also held in more than 40 other countries.[6][7][8] It was one of the first computer programming conferences to develop and adhere to a code of conduct.[1]: 565  The conference hosts tutorials, demonstrations and training sessions.[9]

PyCon 2020 was listed as one of "The best software engineering conferences [to attend] of 2020" and "As Python becomes ever more popular in the scientific community and for big data, the influence of PyCon will continue to grow."[10] PyCon is often attended by Guido van Rossum (the author of the Python language).[2][11] Other groups, such as PyLadies and Django Girls, often have concurrent sessions.[12]

It is sometimes referred to in software documentation and conference papers.[13][14]

It is organised by the Python Software Foundation, and is supported by many significant companies, including Microsoft,[15][16] Google,[17] and Facebook.[18]

Location history[edit]

The canonical "PyCon" has run annually in the United States[19] since 2003 (20 years ago) (2003) in Washington, D.C:

Year Location Number of Attendees
2003 Washington, D.C. 200
2004 300
2005 400
2006 Dallas, Texas 400
2007 500
2008 Chicago, Illinois 1,000
2009 900
2010 Atlanta, Georgia 1,000
2011 1,400
2012 Santa Clara, California 2,300
2013 2,500
2014 Montreal, Quebec (Canada) 2,500
2015 3,100
2016 Portland, Oregon 3,294 (badges issued)[20]
2017 3,391 (badges received)[21]
2018 Cleveland, Ohio 3,260 (Checked-in people)[22]
2019 3,393 (Checked-in people)[23]
2020 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Virtual online-only event due to the COVID-19 pandemic[24]
2021
2022 Salt Lake City, Utah sessions also streamed online
2023
2024 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Planned)
2025

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Barry, Paul (2016). Head First Python: A Brain-Friendly Guide. "O'Reilly Media, Inc.". ISBN 978-1-4919-1949-1. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  2. ^ a b Severance, Charles (2015). "Guido van Rossum: The Modern Era of Python". Computer. 48 (3): 8–10. doi:10.1109/MC.2015.73.page 10
  3. ^ "5 Must-Attend Python Conferences in 2018 (October - December)". www.merixstudio.com.
  4. ^ "PyCon". Retrieved 2020-03-21.
  5. ^ Python, Real. "How to Get the Most Out of PyCon – Real Python". realpython.com.
  6. ^ "Conferences and Workshops". Python.org.
  7. ^ "PythonConferences - Python Wiki". wiki.python.org.
  8. ^ "Join us at PyCon". pycon.org.
  9. ^ Boschetti, Alberto; Massaron, Luca (2016). Python Data Science Essentials. Packt Publishing Ltd. p. 352. ISBN 978-1-78646-283-1. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  10. ^ Mello, John P. Jr. "The best software engineering conferences of 2020". TechBeacon.
  11. ^ "Python Creator Guido van Rossum Retires, Heads To Python Conference - Slashdot". developers.slashdot.org.
  12. ^ "Django Girls invite would-be coders to PyCon this October". 12 September 2017.
  13. ^ "Google Scholar". scholar.google.com.
  14. ^ "Google Scholar". scholar.google.com.
  15. ^ "Come meet Microsoft at PyCon 2019!". 25 April 2019.
  16. ^ "Microsoft sponsors first Aussie Python conference". 12 May 2010.
  17. ^ "A message from Google to the Python community".
  18. ^ "Facebook: Building the Future Together"."We’re thrilled to have the support of Facebook as a PSF and PyCon Principal Sponsor for 2020!"
  19. ^ "PyCon US". us.pycon.org.
  20. ^ "PyCon-staff mailing list archive". Retrieved Jun 6, 2016.
  21. ^ "Final remarks and conference close - Pycon 2017". YouTube. Retrieved May 24, 2017.
  22. ^ "Sponsorship Prospectus - PyCon 2019 in Cleveland, Ohio". Retrieved May 21, 2019.
  23. ^ "Sponsorship Prospectus - PyCon 2020 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania". Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  24. ^ Broberg, Matthew; Jodlowska, Ewa. "The real impact of canceling PyCon due to COVID-19". Opensource.com. Retrieved 17 May 2020.

External links[edit]