Q64, QM4 and QM44 buses

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q64
qm4, qm44
Jewel Avenue Line[1]
MTA NYC logo.svg
A Q64 bus entering service at 164th Street in Electchester
A Q64 bus entering service at 164th Street in Electchester
Overview
System MTA Regional Bus Operations
Operator MTA Bus Company
Garage Baisley Park Depot (Q64, QM4, QM44)
Vehicle
Began service 1951 (Q65A)
1971 (QM4)
2016 (QM44)
Route
Locale Queens
Communities served Electchester, Kew Gardens Hills, Forest Hills
Start Electchester, Queens – Parsons Boulevard and Jewel Avenue (Q64)
Electchester, Queens – Horace Harding Expressway and 164th Street (QM4, QM44)
Via Jewel Avenue (Q64)
Sixth Avenue, Queensboro Bridge, Queens Boulevard, Jewel Avenue (QM4 Eastbound)
Sixth Avenue, Midtown Tunnel, Long Island Expressway, Queens Boulevard (QM4 Westbound)
Third Avenue, Queensboro Bridge, Queens Boulevard, Jewel Avenue (QM44 Eastbound)
Third Avenue, Midtown Tunnel, Long Island Expressway, Queens Boulevard (QM44 Westoboumd)
End Forest Hills, Queens – Queens Boulevard and 71st Avenue, Forest Hills–71st Avenue station (Q64)
Midtown Manhattan –Sixth Avenue and 36th Street (QM4 First Stop to Queens)
Midtown Manhattan –Third Avenue and 39th Street (QM44 First Stop to Queens)
Midtown Manhattan –Third Avenue and 57th Street (QM4 Last Stop)
Midtown Manhattan –Third Avenue and 56th Street (QM44 Last Stop)
Service
Operates 24 hours (Q64)[note 1][2][3]
Daily ridership Q64: 2,964,103 (2015)[4]
QM4: 202,331 (2015)[4]
Fare $2.75 (Q64)$6.50 (QM4/QM44) (MetroCard or coins)
Cash Coins only (exact change required)
Transfers Yes
Timetable Q64
QM4/QM44
← Q60
QM3
QM34
 {{{system_nav}}}  Q65
QM5
BM1 →

The Q64, QM4 and QM44 bus routes constitute a public transit line in Queens, New York City, United States. The east-to-west Q64 route runs primarily on Jewel Avenue operating between the Forest Hills–71st Avenue subway station in Forest Hills and 164th Street in Electchester. The QM4 route is an express bus route running from Midtown Manhattan to Electchester running via Sixth Avenue in Manhattan and Jewel Avenue in Queens. The QM44 route is an express bus route running from Midtown Manhattan to Electchester running via Third Avenue in Manhattan and Jewel Avenue in Queens.

The Q64 (formerly the Q65A), QM4 and QM44 were originally operated by Queens-Nassau Transit Lines, Queens Transit Corporation, and Queens Surface Corporation from 1951 to 2005; they are now operated by MTA Regional Bus Operations under the MTA Bus Company brand.

Route description and service[edit]

Q64[edit]

The eastbound Q64 starts at the Forest Hills–71st Avenue subway station in Forest Hills on the north side of Queens Boulevard at 71st Avenue. Then the bus route turns onto Jewel Avenue, crossing over the Grand Central Parkway, Flushing Meadows – Corona Park, and Van Wyck Expressway. The bus then travels through Kew Gardens Hills, Queens, and passes by Queens College. Eastbound buses turn south onto Parsons Boulevard, then run east along 71st Avenue, terminating at 164th Street. Buses lay over on the east side of 164th Street before reentering service on Jewel Avenue.[5][6][7][8]

The westbound Q64 essentially follows the same route until just west of the Van Wyck Expressway, where the westbound Q64 turns slightly north onto 69th Road, which runs parallel to Jewel Avenue. The westbound Q64 continues along 69th Road until the intersection with 108th Street, where buses turn left and continue four blocks to Queens Boulevard. Buses lay over at the west side of 108th Street between Queens Boulevard and 70th Road.[5][6][7][8]

QM4[edit]

A former Queens Surface Orion V CNG bus on QM4 service in Manhattan.

Eastbound QM4 service via Sixth Avenue begins at Sixth Avenue and 36th Street. The route then pick up passengers along Sixth Avenue. Sixth Avenue service turns onto 57th Street. Afterwards, the service moves onto 59th Street, and then turns onto the Queensboro Bridge crossing over the East River into Queens. Once in Queens, the bus continues along Queens Boulevard making no stops until it reaches Jewel Avenue. The bus drops off passengers along Jewel Avenue, and turns onto 164th Street, with its final stop at the Horace Harding Expressway.[5][6][8][3]

Westbound QM4 service begins at 164th Street and the Horace Harding Expressway, and then turns onto Jewel Avenue picking up passengers. Once the route reaches Queens Boulevard, the bus stops picking up passengers. The bus route then continues via Queens Boulevard until it turns onto the Long Island Expressway. It then goes under the East River through the Queens Midtown Tunnel. Once in Manhattan the bus goes via Sixth Avenue. The bus drops off passengers and then turns via 57th Street, terminating at Third Avenue.[5][6][8][3]

QM44[edit]

Eastbound QM44 service begins at Third Avenue and 39th Street. The route then picks up passengers along Third Avenue. Afterwards, the service moves onto 59th Street, and then turns onto the Queensboro Bridge crossing over the East River into Queens. Once in Queens, the bus continues along Queens Boulevard making no stops until it reaches Jewel Avenue. The bus drops off passengers along Jewel Avenue, and turns onto 164th Street, with its final stop at the Horace Harding Expressway.[5][6][8][3]

Westbound QM44 service begins at 164th Street and the Horace Harding Expressway, and then turns onto Jewel Avenue picking up passengers. Once the route reaches Queens Boulevard, the bus stops picking up passengers. The bus route then continues via Queens Boulevard until it turns onto the Long Island Expressway. It then goes under the East River through the Queens Midtown Tunnel. Once in Manhattan the bus goes via Third Avenue until its last stop at 56th Street.[5][6][8][3]

QM44 service only operates during rush hours in the peak direction.[3]

History[edit]

A QM4 under Queens Surface operation in Midtown Manhattan.

In November 1949,[9] the Queens Valley Home Owners' Association of Kew Gardens Hills proposed an extension of the city's Q44 Vleigh Place shuttle bus (later the Q74) west from its northern terminus at Jewel Avenue and Main Street to the 71st–Continental Avenues subway station of the IND Queens Boulevard Line in Forest Hills, to give Kew Gardens Hills additional bus service. It would have created a loop service between the 71st Avenue station and the nearby Kew Gardens – Union Turnpike station of the same line, running via Main Street. The proposed route was numbered as the Q75.[9][10][11] The proposal was submitted to the New York City Board of Transportation on March 20, 1951.[9] On June 19, transit officials informed the Board of Estimate it wouldn't be advisable to extend that route.[10] In response, Queens–Nassau Transit (the predecessor to the Queens Surface Corporation) proposed the Q65A bus to run along the entire length of Jewel Avenue between 164th Street to the 71st Avenue station at Queens Boulevard. In an alternate proposal, Queens–Nassau Transit proposed having the route terminate at the 75th Avenue subway station, in between the 71st Avenue and Union Turnpike stops.[10][12] The Q65A's introduction was also meant to help alleviate congestion at the Union Turnpike subway station. The Queens Valley Association opposed the Q65A proposal, due to it only serving the northern portion of Kew Gardens Hills.[12] It also opposed the 75th Avenue terminus, as 75th Avenue is a local station.[10][12]

The Board of Estimate approved Queens-Nassau Transit's proposal on August 17, 1951.[1] On November 14, 1951, bus service began on the Q65A.[1][13] The route was originally a spur of the Q65, for which the bus route was named.[14] On August 2, 1953, the Q65A's terminal route was changed. Originally Q65A bus traveled east on Jewel Avenue all the way to 164th Street, until they looped around at 165th Street. The route was changed so that buses would turn south on Parsons Boulevard, east on 71st Avenue, and then north on 164th Street to the terminus at Jewel Avenue; this is the current routing of the bus line. The change was met with resentment from the local community due to the opening of Public School 200 at 164th Street and 71st Avenue.[15][16] Queens-Nassau would become the Queens Transit Corporation in 1957.[17] In 1964, City Councilman Seymour Boyers of Flushing proposed extending the Q65A to 188th Street and 73rd Avenue, via 164th Street and 73rd Avenue. The proposed extension would have provided additional access to Queens College, providing an alternate route to the Q17, would provide an access route to the World's Fair, and it would provide access to the IND subway station at 71st Avenue, which would have relieved congestion at the Kew Gardens subway station.[18]

Service on the QM4 began on August 16, 1971 being operated by Queens Transit Corporation. Service was not originally given a number, but was called the Jewel Avenue–Flushing/Hillcrest Express. Originally some buses started at Kissena Boulevard instead of the Long Island Expressway.[19][20] The bus company would become Queens-Steinway Transit Corporation in 1986, before finally becoming Queens Surface Corporation in 1988.[17]

MTA takeover[edit]

A Q64 bus entering service in Forest Hills in 2011, when the route was still dispatched from the College Point Depot.

On February 27, 2005, the MTA Bus Company took over the operations of the Queens Surface routes, part of the city's takeover of all the remaining privately operated bus routes.[21][22] On September 2, 2007, the Q65A was renumbered to the Q64.[23][24] Until 2010, the Q64 operated out of College Point Depot (the former Queens Surface garage), but since then it has been operating out of the Baisley Park Depot (the former Jamaica Buses facility) in South Jamaica.[25] On September 8, 2013, overnight service was added making the Q64 a 24/7 bus route, eliminating the gap in service between 2:30 and 4:00 AM.[26]

On July 5, 2016, the branch of the QM4 along Third Avenue was relabeled as the QM44 as part of the renumbering of Queens express routes' Third Avenue branches.[27][28]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "QM4 operates service at all times except during late nights and early mornings". 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Jewel Avenue Line Buses to Roll Wednesday". Long Island Star-Journal. Fultonhistory.com. November 10, 1951. p. 2. Retrieved March 2, 2016. 
  2. ^ MTA Regional Bus Operations. "Q64 bus schedule" (PDF). 
  3. ^ a b c d e f MTA Regional Bus Operations. "QM4 bus schedule" (PDF). 
  4. ^ a b "Facts and Figures". mta.info. August 28, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Queens Bus Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 2017. Retrieved July 17, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f Urbitran Associates, Inc (May 2004). "NYCDOT Bus Ridership Survey and Route Analysis Final Report: Chapter 3 Transit System Characteristics" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 16, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Urbitran Associates, Inc (May 2004). "NYCDOT Bus Ridership Survey and Route Analysis Final Report: Chapter 4 Operating and Financial Performance" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f "Appendix B: Route Profiles" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 8, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b c "Kew Hills Lines up for Finish Fight Thursday for Shuttle Extension". Long Island Star-Journal. Fultonhistory.com. July 17, 1951. Retrieved March 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c d "Kew Hills Taxpayers To Discuss Bus Route". Long Island Star–Journal. August 4, 1951. Retrieved January 18, 2016 – via Fultonhistory.com. 
  11. ^ "Start of Q-65A Bus Line Delayed For 2 Weeks More by Legal Tangles". Long Island Star–Journal. October 16, 1951. Retrieved January 19, 2016 – via Fultonhistory.com. 
  12. ^ a b c "Kew Hills Group Urges City Buses As Link to Forest Hills Subway". Long Island Star-Journal. Fultonhistory.com. August 9, 1951. p. 4. Retrieved March 2, 2016. 
  13. ^ Martin, Guy E. (2005). New York City Transit Buses 1945–1975 Photo Archive. Hudson, Wisconsin: Iconografix. p. 116. ISBN 1-58388-149-2. 
  14. ^ "New Bus Route". Long Island Star – Journal. September 27, 1951. Retrieved January 19, 2016 – via Fultonhistory.com. 
  15. ^ "Kids Endangered Residents Hit New Looping of Q-65A Bus". Long Island Star–Journal. August 25, 1953. Retrieved January 18, 2016 – via Fultonhistory.com. 
  16. ^ "PSC Blamed for Changing Q-65A Bus Route". Long Island Star–Journal. Retrieved January 18, 2016 – via Fultonhistory.com. 
  17. ^ a b Roger P. Roess; Gene Sansone (August 23, 2012). The Wheels That Drove New York: A History of the New York City Transit System. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 273. ISBN 978-3-642-30484-2. 
  18. ^ "Q65A, Flushing Longer Bus Run Ask". Long Island Star–Journal. March 23, 1964. Retrieved January 19, 2016 – via Fultonhistory.com. 
  19. ^ "Queens Transit Express Buses Timetable 1983". Photobucket. Queens Transit. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Queens Transit Express Buses Timetable 1983". Photobucket. Queens Transit. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  21. ^ Silverman, Norman (July 26, 2010). "The Merger of 7 Private Bus Companies into MTA Bus" (PDF). apta.com. American Public Transportation Association, Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 16, 2015. Retrieved October 16, 2015. 
  22. ^ Woodberry, Jr., Warren (February 24, 2005). "MAJOR BUS CO. TO JOIN MTA". Daily News (New York). Retrieved January 4, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Q64 Bus Timetable Winter 2008" (PDF). mta.info. MTA Bus. Archived from the original on September 8, 2008. Retrieved January 10, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Bus Company Schedules". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on March 7, 2008. Retrieved January 10, 2016. 
  25. ^ "MTA Bus: Baisley Park Pick Glossary" (PDF). baisleyparkfamily.com. MTA Bus Company. June 28, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  26. ^ "mta.info | Planned Service Changes". web.mta.info. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  27. ^ "mta.info | Service Notice". web.mta.info. Retrieved July 1, 2016. 
  28. ^ "ADVISORY: MTA Bus Company Renames Eight Express Routes Serving Queens and Manhattan". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 14, 2016. Retrieved June 13, 2017. 

External links[edit]