Drug-induced QT prolongation

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Drug-induced QT prolongation is seen with a QT interval above 450 ms on the ECG and is usually a result of treatment by anti-arrhythmic drugs, such as amiodarone and sotalol, or a number of other drugs that have been reported to cause this problem (e.g., cisapride). Some antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and ziprasidone, have a prolonged QT interval as a rare side-effect. Antihistamines, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin may also cause drug-induced LQT. Genetic mutations may make one more susceptible to drug-induced LQT. It is associated with hypokalaemia, hypocalcaemia and hypothermia and may lead to torsades de pointes.[citation needed]

List of drugs associated with prolonging the QT interval that may or may not have FDA warnings.[1]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Beach SR, Celano CM, Noseworthy PA, Januzzi JL, Huffman JC (2013). "QTc prolongation, torsades de pointes, and psychotropic medications". Psychosomatics. 54 (1): 1–13. doi:10.1016/j.psym.2012.11.001. PMID 23295003.
  2. ^ "Moxifloxacin: increased risk of life-threatening liver reactions and other serious risks". UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Citalopram and escitalopram: QT interval prolongation". UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.
  4. ^ "Hydroxyzine (Atarax, Ucerax): risk of QT interval prolongation and Torsade de Pointes". UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.
  5. ^ "Apomorphine with domperidone: minimising risk of cardiac side effects". UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.
  6. ^ Zemrak WR, Kenna GA (2008). "Association of Antipsychotic and Antidepressant Drugs With Q-T interval Prolongation". WebMD LLC. Retrieved January 14, 2017.
  7. ^ Taylor, D (2004). "Cocaine induced prolongation of the QT interval". Emergency Medicine Journal. 21 (2): 252–253. doi:10.1136/emj.2002.003251.
  8. ^ "Toremifene (Fareston): risk of QT prolongation". UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.

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