Qeerroo

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Qeerroo Street in Asella was named to remember Qeerroos struggle

The Qeerroo (also Qeeyroo or Qero) is a political movement popular among a faction of young Oromo men in Ethiopia.[1][2] In traditional Oromo culture the term means "bachelor"[3][4][5] but within the political movement it means "youth," symbolizing the Oromo struggle for increased political freedom, greater ethnic representation in government, "... an entire generation of newly assertive Ethiopian youth," and the reclamation of Ethiopia under Qeerroo rule.[1]

The Qeerroo, also known as the Qubee generation, "first emerged in 1991 with the participation of the Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) in the transitional government of Ethiopia."[6] Qeerroos also played a key role in the 2016 Ethiopian protests.[7] The BBC has described Qeerroo as being another name for Ethiopia's National Youth Movement for Freedom and Democracy (NYMFD),[8] which calls itself Qeerroo Bilisummaa Oromoo.[9] Jawar Mohammed, a Qeerroo,[10] played a key role in founding the NYMFD.[8]

Aftermath[edit]

The Qeerroo movement inspired many marginalized ethnic to create their own youth movement. Some of youth movements are Ejjetto, Barbaarta, Fano and Zarma. Both the Somali youth Barbaarta demand to end Abdi Illey’s Presidency and the Sidama youth Ejjatto demand to statehood of Sidama succeeded.[11][12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gardner, Tom (13 March 2018). "'Freedom!': the mysterious movement that brought Ethiopia to a standstill". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-10-31 – via www.theguardian.com.
  2. ^ "How An Exiled Activist In Minnesota Helped Spur Big Political Changes In Ethiopia". NPR.org. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  3. ^ "A problem for Ethiopia's leader: the young men who helped him to power". Reuters. 2 November 2018. Retrieved 2019-10-31 – via www.reuters.com.
  4. ^ "Violence during Ethiopian protests was ethnically tinged, say eyewitnesses". Reuters. 26 October 2019. Retrieved 2019-10-31 – via www.reuters.com.
  5. ^ "Ethiopia: Youth gather at Jawar Mohammed's house to show support". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  6. ^ Jalata, Asafa. "Why the Oromo protests mark a change in Ethiopia's political landscape". The Conversation. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  7. ^ "How An Exiled Activist In Minnesota Helped Spur Big Political Changes In Ethiopia". NPR.org. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  8. ^ a b "How did US and Ethiopia become so close?". 8 April 2019. Retrieved 2019-10-31 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  9. ^ "Qeerroo". qeerroo.org. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  10. ^ Gardner, Tom (20 August 2018). "Jawar Mohammed's red-carpet return signals Ethiopia's political sea change". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-10-31 – via www.theguardian.com.
  11. ^ "Ethiopia's Sidama vote for new federal region: Electoral board". aljazeera.com.
  12. ^ "THE RISE OF THE BARBAARTA: Somali protesters demand an end to Abdi Illey's reign of terror". opride.com.
  13. ^ "Ejjetto calls for workers strike in Hawassa". mereja.com.