Quake (series)

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Quake
Quake logo.png
Genre(s)First-person shooter
Developer(s)id Software
Raven Software
Hyperion Entertainment
Bullfrog Productions
Lobotomy Software
Raster Productions
Hammerhead
Publisher(s)GT Interactive
(1996–1997)
Activision
(1997–2009)
Electronic Arts
(2001) (Quake III Revolution)
Square Electronic Arts
(2001) (Quake III Revolution Japanese version)
Bethesda Softworks
(2010–present)
Nvidia
(2019) (Quake II RTX)
Platform(s)MS-DOS, Microsoft Windows, OS X, Linux, Sega Saturn, Nintendo 64, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, Xbox, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Dreamcast Nintendo Switch
First releaseQuake
June 22, 1996
Latest releaseQuake Champions
August 22, 2017

Quake is a series of first-person shooter video games, developed by id Software and, as of 2010, published by Bethesda Softworks. The series is composed of the eponymous game from 1996 and its nonlinear, standalone sequels which vary in setting and plot.

Quake was created as a successor franchise to id's highly successful Doom series, which had begun in 1993. As a new series, it built upon the fast-paced gameplay, game engine, and 3D graphics capabilities of Doom.[1] It also expanded upon the multiplayer capabilities of Doom by introducing online multiplayer over the internet. This contributed to the popularity of the Quake series and characterized it as a figurehead in online gaming.[2]

Games[edit]

Release timeline
1996Quake
1997Quake Mission Pack No. 1: Scourge of Armagon
Quake Mission Pack No. 2: Dissolution of Eternity
Quake II
1998Quake II Mission Pack: The Reckoning
Quake II Mission Pack: Ground Zero
1999Quake III Arena
2000Quake III: Team Arena
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005Quake 4
2006
2007Enemy Territory: Quake Wars
2008
2009
2010Quake Live
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016Quake: Dimension of the Past
2017Quake Champions
2018
2019
2020
2021Quake: Dimension of the Machine

Every game in the Quake franchise shares a basis in first-person shooter gameplay. However, the series lacks a singular narrative across all of its entries. Two major storylines exist within the franchise, as well as the Arena series, which focuses primarily on multiplayer gameplay.

Original storyline[edit]

The game's original plot focused on the player character, later known as "Ranger" in Quake III: Arena, who travels across alternate dimensions to stop an enemy code-named "Quake". The game takes place in a Lovecraftian setting with a mixture of dark fantasy, pseudo-medieval, and science fiction.[3][4]

Quake II storyline[edit]

An in-name-only game that shifted the series to the science fiction genre, Quake II and its sequels chronicle the war between humanity and the cybernetic alien race known as the Strogg.[5]

Arena series[edit]

Quake III Arena and its successors focus on competitive multiplayer rather than a single-player experience. These games de-emphasized the setting of the first two installments while still retaining continuity with them and crossing over with id's Doom franchise. Quake Champions, in particular, is heavily influenced by the mythology of the original game.[6]

Reception[edit]

Aggregate review scores
Game GameRankings Metacritic
Quake (SAT) 64%[9] (PC) 94[7]
(N64) 74[8]
Quake Mission Pack No. 1: Scourge of Armagon (PC) 82%[10]
Quake Mission Pack No. 2: Dissolution of Eternity (PC) 83%[11]
Quake II (PC) 87%[12]
(N64) 81%[13]
(PS) 79%[14]
Quake II Mission Pack: The Reckoning (PC) 69%[15]
Quake II Mission Pack: Ground Zero (PC) 65%[16]
Quake III Arena (PC) 83%[20] (DC) 93[17]
(PS2) 84[18]
(X360) 69[19]
Quake III: Team Arena (PC) 69[21]
Quake 4 (PC) 81[22]
(X360) 75[23]
Enemy Territory: Quake Wars (PC) 84[24]
(X360) 69[25]
(PS3) 60[26]

Since its first release, the series has received mostly positive reviews.

Quake,[27][28][29] Quake II,[30][31][32] and Quake III Arena[33][34] have all been considered by various video game journalists and magazines to be among the greatest video games of all time.

Controversy[edit]

Like Doom, the Quake series initially received controversy due to containing high amounts of graphic violence. Public and media outcry over Quake and other violent video games peaked after the Columbine High School massacre occurred on April 20, 1999, and it became known that perpetrators Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were avid players of both Doom and Quake. This finding prompted claims from media outlets that violent video games caused negative psychological effects on children that made them more aggressive and accepting of violence.[35][36]

id Software co-founder John Romero later stated in a 2013 interview that the company and its developers had never intended to "offend people or shock people" with their games.[37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reece, Doug (May 25, 1996). "`Quake' creating tremors among game players". Billboard. 108 (21): 76.
  2. ^ Ratliff, John (1999). "Earth Quake". Texas Monthly. 27 (8): 82.
  3. ^ Quake (game manual). ID Software. 1996.
  4. ^ Connors, William W.; Rivera, Mike; Orzel, Sylvia. Quake 3 Arena Manual.
  5. ^ Lien, Tracey (December 7, 2012). "Quake 2 turns 15-years-old today". Polygon. Retrieved November 15, 2017.
  6. ^ "Bethesda Games Catalog | Quake Champions Platinum". bethesda.net.
  7. ^ "Quake Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  8. ^ "Quake Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  9. ^ "Quake Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  10. ^ "Quake Mission Pack No. 1: Scourge of Armagon Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  11. ^ "Quake Mission Pack No. 2: Dissolution of Eternity Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  12. ^ "Quake II Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  13. ^ "Quake II Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  14. ^ "Quake II Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  15. ^ "Quake II Mission Pack: The Reckoning Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  16. ^ "Quake II Mission Pack: Ground Zero Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  17. ^ "Quake III Arena Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  18. ^ "Quake III Revolution Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  19. ^ "Quake Arena Arcade Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  20. ^ "Quake III Arena Reviews". GameRankings. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  21. ^ "Quake III: Team Arena Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  22. ^ "Quake 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  23. ^ "Quake 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  24. ^ "Enemy Territory: Quake Wars Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  25. ^ "Enemy Territory: Quake Wars Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  26. ^ "Enemy Territory: Quake Wars Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  27. ^ "The Greatest Games of All Time". GameSpot. 2007. Archived from the original on July 26, 2008. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  28. ^ "The 100 Greatest Games Of All Time". Empire. 2009. Archived from the original on May 15, 2011. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  29. ^ Griffin, Joe (November 29, 2013). "The 50 best videogames of all time". The Irish Times. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  30. ^ "IGN's Top 100 Games, 2005". IGN. December 13, 2013. Archived from the original on December 13, 2013. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  31. ^ "The Top 100 Games of All Time!". IGN. 2007. Archived from the original on December 3, 2007. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  32. ^ "The 100 greatest computer games of all time". uk.videogames.games.yahoo.com. Yahoo!. 2005. Archived from the original on August 1, 2005. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  33. ^ "The 100 best games of all time". GamesRadar. April 1, 2011. Archived from the original on January 18, 2012. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  34. ^ "G4TV's Top 100 Games". G4. October 6, 2012. Archived from the original on November 23, 2014. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  35. ^ Brunner, Rob; Essex, Andrew; Gordinier, Jeff; Jacobs, A.j.; Karger, Dave; Robischon, Noah; Snierson, Dan; Svetkey, Benjamin (June 11, 1999). "The Hollywood Ten". Entertainment Weekly (489): 36.
  36. ^ Brown, Janelle (April 23, 1999). "Doom, Quake and mass murder". Salon. Retrieved April 11, 2022.
  37. ^ "After 20 years, Doom co-creator John Romero looks back on the impact of a seminal (and Satanic) game (interview)". VentureBeat. December 11, 2013. Retrieved April 11, 2022.