Queen Street, Melbourne

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Queen Street
Victoria
Queen Street Melbourne.jpg
Queen Street facing north from Flinders Street
Coordinates 37°48′46″S 144°57′35″E / 37.81264609999999°S 144.9596861°E / -37.81264609999999; 144.9596861Coordinates: 37°48′46″S 144°57′35″E / 37.81264609999999°S 144.9596861°E / -37.81264609999999; 144.9596861
General information
Type Street
Opened 1837
Major junctions
North end Victoria Street
  Franklin Street
Abeckett Street
La Trobe Street
Lonsdale Street
Bourke Street
Collins Street
South end Flinders Street
Location(s)
Suburb(s) Melbourne, North Melbourne
A classic underground toilet on Queen Street

Queen Street is a street in the central business district of Melbourne, Australia. The street forms part of the original Hoddle Grid and was laid out in 1837.[1] It runs roughly north-south and is primarily a commercial and financial thoroughfare of the city centre.

Queen Street is named for Queen Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, queen consort of King William IV.[2]

Geography[edit]

The northern end of Queen Street intersects with Victoria Street, while its southern end intersects with Flinders Street. Queen Street bisects the Queen Victoria Market into the dry section and wet section.[3]

Notable Buildings[edit]

Aas part of the traditional financial district of Melbourne, Queen Street is home to many buildings listed on Victorian Heritage Register and/or classified by the National Trust of Australia. These include:

There are also many notable high-rise office buildings along Queen Street, including:

Queen Street massacre[edit]

On 8 December 1987 an armed gunman killed 8 people and injured 5 others at the Australia Police offices at 191 Queen Street. The gunman Frank Vitkovic eventually fell from a building window taking the death toll to 9.[4]

A memorial window for the victims is located at Melbourne's GPO on Elizabeth and Bourke Streets.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Melbourne city grid | Ergo". ergo.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  2. ^ "Melbourne's Streets & Lanes" (PDF). The Royal Historical Society of Victoria. Retrieved 28 April 2016. 
  3. ^ "About - Queen Victoria Market". Queen Victoria Market. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  4. ^ "Melbourne remembers Queen St massacre - Breaking News - National - Breaking News". www.smh.com.au. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 
  5. ^ Design, UBC Web. "Australian Post and Telecom Credit Union Victims Memorial | Monument Australia". monumentaustralia.org.au. Retrieved 2017-01-29. 

See also[edit]

Australia road sign W5-29.svg Australian Roads portal