Queerty

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Queerty
Type of site
Online magazine
Available inEnglish
OwnerQ.Digital
EditorDaniel Tracer
Websitequeerty.com
Alexa rank8961 (January 2015)[1]
CommercialYes
Launched2005
Current statusActive

Queerty is an online magazine and newspaper covering gay-oriented lifestyle and news, founded in 2005 by David Hauslaib.[2][3] As of June 2015, the site had more than five million monthly unique visitors.[4]

History[edit]

Queerty was founded by David Hauslaib in 2005 with Bradford Shellhammer serving as founding editor. The site briefly shut down operations in 2011 before being sold to Q.Digital, which currently owns and operates it.[5][6]

Newsweek called Queerty "a leading site for gay issues" in 2010.[7]

The site bestows the Queerty Awards or "Queerties", in which their readers vote for the "best of LGBTQ Media and Culture".[8] A record 300,000 votes were gathered in 2017.[8]

Queerty was recently[when?] criticized as being a contributor to fake online outrage.[9] The cited article had a title suggesting Trump fans were outraged to see a picture of a female soccer player kissing another female, but the article provided no facts supporting the presumption of title.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Queerty.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved January 10, 2015.
  2. ^ Barnako, Frank (September 16, 2005). "Gay blog is example of Web log strength". MarketWatch. Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  3. ^ Penenberg, Adam L. (September 22, 2005). "Can bloggers strike it rich?". Wired. Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  4. ^ "LGBTs More Surprised Than Heterosexuals at Pace of Public Opinion Shift on Marriage Equality". GayCities. June 24, 2015.
  5. ^ Towle, Andy (April 18, 2011). "LGBT Blog Queerty Closes". Towleroad. Retrieved January 10, 2015.
  6. ^ Bull, Chris (May 5, 2011). "GayCities Welcomes You to the New Queerty". Queerty. Retrieved January 10, 2015.
  7. ^ Conant, Eve (May 25, 2010). "Conservatives and Gay-Rights Advocates Not Happy With 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Compromise". Newsweek. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  8. ^ a b Reddish, David (February 22, 2017). "And the winners of the 2017 Queerties are..." Queerty. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  9. ^ "Why do you need to invent online outrage?". Washington Examiner. 2019-07-11. Retrieved 2019-07-11.
  10. ^ Reddish, David (2019-07-09). "Trump fans adopted soccer star Kelley O'Hara as their hero. Then they watched this kiss". www.queerty.com. Retrieved 2019-07-11.

External links[edit]