Quentin Poole

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Quentin H. Poole (born 1957)[1] is an English oboist, conductor and former boy chorister, who served as Head Chorister of King's College, Cambridge.[2]

Poole was born in Surrey, England, the son of Joseph W. Poole and Esme B. Mounsey Poole,[3] but he grew up, as the youngest of five children, at Coventry, where his father was Precentor of Coventry Cathedral.[4] He learned piano from the age of seven and trained under Sir David Willcocks at King's College,[5] where he joined the choir aged nine.[4] He also took up the flute there.[4] He subsequently sang in the choir of The King's School, Canterbury,[4] and was a member of the National Youth Orchestra.[5]

He studied at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge and then at the Royal Academy of Music under Janet Craxton.[5]

Poole was a founder, member and oboist of the Endymion Ensemble and later its conductor.[5] He was also principal oboe for the City of London Sinfonia and other orchestras and chamber groups.[5] He was Director of Music of the Purcell School from 2001,[5] from which he was made redundant in 2013.[6] He was made a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music in 2004.[5]

He appeared as a "castaway" on the BBC Radio programme Desert Island Discs on 26 December 1970.[4] He was 13 at the time; the programme's youngest guest.[4] His picture was published in a contemporary issue of the Radio Times.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  2. ^ "Candlelight Services at Liston". Foxearth and Liston. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  3. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Desert Island Discs - Castaway : Quentin Poole". BBC Online. BBC. Retrieved 13 August 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Quentin Poole". NMC Recordings. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  6. ^ Stevens, Alex (16 October 2013). "Purcell School 'deletes' head of music role, likes to get kinky in the shrinky ‒ the background". Classical Music Magazine. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. Retrieved 14 August 2014.

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