Quetame

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Quetame
Municipality and town
Flag of Quetame
Flag
Official seal of Quetame
Seal
Location of the municipality and town inside Cundinamarca Department of Colombia
Location of the municipality and town inside Cundinamarca Department of Colombia
Quetame is located in Colombia
Quetame
Quetame
Location in Colombia
Coordinates: 4°19′49″N 73°51′46″W / 4.33028°N 73.86278°W / 4.33028; -73.86278Coordinates: 4°19′49″N 73°51′46″W / 4.33028°N 73.86278°W / 4.33028; -73.86278
Country  Colombia
Department Cundinamarca
Province Eastern Province
Founded 26 June 1826
Founded by Josè Joaquin Guarín
Government
 • Mayor Wilder Enrique Moreno Hernández
(2016-2019)
Area
 • Municipality and town 138.47 km2 (53.46 sq mi)
 • Urban 0.29 km2 (0.11 sq mi)
Elevation 1,496 m (4,908 ft)
Population (2015)
 • Municipality and town 7,141
 • Density 52/km2 (130/sq mi)
 • Urban 1,609
Time zone Colombia Standard Time (UTC-5)
Website Official website

Quetame is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Eastern Province, part of the department of Cundinamarca. The urban centre of Quetame is located at 62 kilometres (39 mi) from the capital Bogotá at an altitude of 1,496 metres (4,908 ft). The municipality borders Fómeque in the north, Fosca and Cáqueza in the west, the department of Meta in the east and in the south with Guayabetal.[1]

Etymology[edit]

The name Quetame comes from Chibcha and means "Our farmfields on the mountains".[1]

History[edit]

In the times before the Spanish conquest, Quetame was inhabited by the Muisca. Quetame was loyal to the cacique of Ubaque.[1]

Modern Quetame was founded on June 26, 1826 by Josè Joaquin Guarín.[1]

Economy[edit]

Main economical activity of Quetame is agriculture with products beans, sagú, maize, peas, arracacha and others.[1]

Earthquake[edit]

On May 24, 2008, there was a magnitude 5.5 earthquake with its epicentre in Quetame that caused at least 3 deaths and destroyed 40% of the buildings in the village. The tremor was also felt in Bogotá and Villavicencio.[2][3]

References[edit]