Qui veut gagner des millions ?

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Qui veut gagner des millions ?
GenreGame show franchise
Created byDavid Briggs
Mike Whitehill
Steven Knight
Presented byJean-Pierre Foucault (2000-2016, 2019)
Camille Combal (2019-)
Theme music composerKeith Strachan
Matthew Strachan
Country of originFrance
Production
Running time52 minutes
Production company(s)Starling (2004-present)
2waytraffic (2008-present)
DistributorCelador (2000-2007)
Sony Pictures Television (2004-present)
Release
Original networkTF1
Original releaseJuly 3, 2000 –
January 1, 2016, 2019 - present
External links
Website

Qui veut gagner des millions ? (Who Wants to Win Millions?) is the French version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, which originated in Great Britain on the ITV network.[1] The aim of the game is to win the top prize of 1,000,000 (previously 3 & 4,000,000 before France adopted the euro) by answering 12 (formerly 15) multiple-choice questions correctly. It is broadcast on the TF1 network, and was hosted by Jean-Pierre Foucault from 2000 until 2019, then by Camille Combal.

For more info about the show and rules, etc., see Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? The money tree differs in amounts, but the format is virtually identical. Just like Kaun Banega Crorepati, the Indian version, the "Switch the Question" lifeline is available once a contestant has answered the 5th question correctly, instead of the 10th. As of April 2009, the money tree eliminated the first three questions, reducing the number of possible questions faced to 12, similar to the new UK format in play from September 2007 to February 2014. For list of international variants of the show, see the List of national variants in Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?.

The show served as a plot device in the French film My Best Friend.

In December 2010, TF1 announced the end of the current formula in its daily version. The bad hearings of the last session in June 2010, certainly due to the change of game schedule, are the cause.[2] Only the prime time version with personalities was maintained between 2010 and 2016, the daily version having stopped. A last issue is released on January 1, 2016.

In December 2018, Jean-Pierre Foucault announces that he stops the presentation of the game and passes to Camille Combal for a return to the air on TF1 in January 2019. Jean-Pierre Foucault then presents a final issue with the new presenter as a guest on a special broadcast before the "handover".[3]

In February 2019, TF1 announces the return of the daily version. The first shootings are scheduled for April 2019, for a broadcast from May 13, 2019,[4] at 6:15 pm.

Game rules[edit]

The goal of the game is to answer a series of 15 questions (12 questions between April 2009 and January 2016) of general culture to try to win the maximum prize, set since September 2001 to 1 000 000 €. The biggest gain was FF 3,000,000 in July 2000 and FF 4,000,000 from September 2000 to July 2001.

Money trees[edit]

Question number Question value (Yellow zones are the guaranteed levels)
early 2000 late 2000-01 2001-09
1 1,000₣ (€152.44) €200
2 2,000₣ (€304.89) €300
3 3,000₣ (€457.34) €500
4 5,000₣ (€762.24) €800
5 10,000₣ (€1,524.49) €1,500
6 20,000₣ (€3,048.98) €3,000
7 40,000₣ (€6,097.96) €6,000
8 80,000₣ (€12,195.92) €12,000
9 150,000₣ (€22,867.35) €24,000
10 300,000₣ (€45,734.70) €48,000
11 500,000₣ (€76,224.50) €72,000
12 700,000₣ (€106,714.31) €100,000
13 1,000,000₣ (€152,449.01) €150,000
14 1,500,000₣ (€228,673.52) 2,000,000₣ (€304,898.03) €300,000
15 3,000,000₣ (€457,347.05) 4,000,000₣ (€609,796.06) €1,000,000
Question number Question value
2009-16
1 €800
2 €1,500
3 €3,000
4 €6,000
5 €12,000
6 €24,000
7 €48,000
8 €72,000
9 €100,000
10 €150,000
11 €300,000
12 €1,000,000
Question number Question value
2019-
1 100 €
2 200 €
3 300 €
4 500 €
5 1 000 €
6 2 000 €
7 4 000 €
8 8 000 €
9 12 000 €
10 24 000 €
11 36 000 €
12 72 000 €
13 150 000 €
14 300 000 €
15 1 000 000 €

Lifelines[edit]

  • Fifty-Fifty (Le cinquante-cinquante): The contestant asks the host to have the computer randomly eliminate two of the incorrect answer choices, leaving the contestant with a choice between the correct answer and one incorrect one.
  • Phone-A-Friend (L'appel à un ami): The contestant may call a prearranged friend. The contestant must provide the friends' names and phone numbers in advance. The contestant has thirty seconds to read the question and four choices to the friend, who must select an answer before the time runs out. Phone-a-friends often express their certainty as a percentage (I am 80% sure it's C).
  • Ask the Audience (L'avis du public): The contestant asks the studio audience which answer they believe is correct. Members of the studio audience indicate their choices using an audience response system. The results are immediately displayed on the contestant's and host's screens. This is a popular lifeline, known for its near-perfect accuracy.
  • Switch the Question (Le switch): This lifeline is not used anymore in France. It was available after the contestant has correctly answered the €1,500 question. If the contestant has not chosen a final answer on the revealed question, this lifeline entitles the contestant to switch out the original question for another question of the same value. Once the contestant elects to use this lifeline, he or she cannot return to the original question, and thus the correct answer is revealed for the record. In addition, any lifelines used by the contestant while attempting to answer the original revealed question prior to the question switch will not be reinstated.
  • Ask the Host (Le feeling de Camille): Used in the 20th anniversary of the British original, the French revival, and the Italian revival. When used by the contestant, the host uses their knowledge of a question's subject, gives their thoughts about the question, and tries to assist them with finding the correct answer out of the choices given. The lifeline features no time limit, and the host reassures all they have no connection to the outside world and receive the question and possible answers for it at the same time as the contestant, and thus have no knowledge of what the correct answer is.

Broadcast[edit]

  • From July 3, 2000 to July 21, 2000 Monday to Friday at 7 pm
  • From September 30, 2000 to December 2, 2000, and from March 17, 2001 to July 7, 2001, every Saturday at 6:55 pm and 8:50 pm
  • From September 15, 2001 to December 1, 2001, every Saturday at 6:55 pm and 8:50 pm
  • From July 1, 2002 to August 23, 2002 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From December 23, 2002 to January 3, 2003 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From July 7, 2003 to August 29, 2003 Monday to Friday at 7 pm
  • From December 22, 2003 to January 9, 2004 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From July 12, 2004 to September 3, 2004 Monday to Friday at 6:50 pm
  • From December 23, 2004 to December 31, 2004 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From June 30, 2005 to September 2, 2005 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From December 17, 2005 to January 1, 2006, every Saturday and Sunday at 6:55 pm
  • From June 5, 2006 to August 4, 2006 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From December 25, 2006 to January 5, 2007 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From May 21, 2007 to July 27, 2007 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From December 24, 2007 to January 4, 2008 Monday to Friday at 7:05 pm
  • From April 14, 2008 to June 27, 2008 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From April 27, 2009 to June 19, 2009 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From December 21, 2009 to January 1, 2010 Monday to Friday at 6:55 pm
  • From June 7, 2010 to July 9, 2010 Monday to Friday at 6:20 pm
  • From May 13, 2019 to June 21, Monday to Friday at 6:15 pm

Characteristics[edit]

The music[edit]

The music commonly associated with the franchise was composed by Keith and Matthew Strachan, father and son. It dramatizes the atmosphere and brings tension, and unlike old games, the music of Who wants to win millions was created to be played during most of the show. The credits take its inspiration from Mars, one of Gustav Holst's Movements of the Planets; each musical theme used for the questions (from € 3,000 to € 48,000, then from € 72,000 to € 300,000 until 2016, from € 2,000 to € 24,000, and from € 36,000 to € 300,000 since 2019). a semitone between each question, to increase tension as candidates progress through the earnings pyramid.

In 2010, the credits are remixed and new music (used in the original British version between 2007 and 2014).

Special issues[edit]

Several special shows, where anonymous candidates played, were aired in prime time (Special Couples, Special Stepmom and Gendre, Special Twins, Special Bachelors and Special New Married, new pacsés) between June 7, 2001 and November 29, 2005.

Prime Time, where celebrities play in teams of two to defend a non-profit association, was also broadcast between September 29, 2001 and January 1, 2016 and now January 19, 2019 ...

Note that only the prime-time version with personalities was maintained between 2010 and 2016, the daily version having stopped.[5]

On July 1, 2003, a special program entitled "L'émission interdite" was broadcast in the second half of the evening. It was entirely devoted to the case Charles Ingram, candidate of the British version of the game who had pocketed 1 million pounds sterling by cheating with the help of two accomplices present in the public and on the set. This was the only time Jean-Pierre Foucault presented the program without the presence of the public.

On September 5, 2015, TF1 offers a special anniversary issue (for the 15 years of the show). There are TV game hosts from TF1 with their biggest winners (including Laurence Boccolini for Money Drop and Jean-Luc Reichmann for Les 12 coups de midi), as well as Christophe Beaugrand and Olivier Minne, as respective hosts of QI: la France passe le test and Joker, accompanied by big winners of these shows, Mathieu and Tristan. There is also Jean-Pierre Foucault playing as a candidate alongside a former grand winner. Laurence Boccolini will take her place.

On January, 1st, 2016, TF1 offers a Pièces Jaunes special issue.

On January 19, 2019, for the return of the game after three years of absence, Jean-Pierre Foucault presents the game for the last time and hosts five pairs of celebrities playing for associations, as in most previous awards. At the end of the show, he receives Camille Combal as a candidate (with Anne-Élisabeth Lemoine), who then becomes the presenter of the game on January 26, 2019; Jean-Pierre Foucault will participate in this show as a candidate.

On April 18, 2019, following the fire at Notre-Dame de Paris, TF1 announced that the Section de recherches series had been replaced by a special edition of Qui veut gagner des millions for the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. There are three pairs of presenters and a duo of Dance avec les stars : Anne-Claire Coudray and Harry Roselmack, Laurence Boccolini and Arthur, Alexandra Sublet and Grégoire Margotton and Fauve Hautot and Chris Marques.

The return of the daily version on May 13, 2019 brought a novelty : during some programs, two contestants participate in the duet game and two celebrities participate in the duet game for an association, which was previously the case only in the programs in the first part of the evening.

Grand prize winners[edit]

  • Frédéric Grégoire won 4 million francs on September 30, 2000.
  • Louis won 4 million francs on November 4, 2000.
  • Marie Friedel won €1 million on August 27, 2004. (She died in 2014, aged 66.)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Qui veut gagner des millions détient le leadership avec ELA". Toutelatele (in French). Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  2. ^ "Audiences : le Mondial booste Nagui, "Qui veut gagner" au plus bas". ozap.com (in French).
  3. ^ ""Qui veut gagner des millions ?" : Jean-Pierre Foucault passe le relais à Camille Combal". LCI (in French). 2018-11-07. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  4. ^ Titou (2019-05-04). "Avis Qui veut gagner des millions ? La quotidienne sur TF1 : Camille Combal à 18H15". Nouveautés Télé : le RDV de l'actu au quotidien (in French).
  5. ^ "Qui veut gagner des millions détient le leadership avec ELA". Toutelatele (in French). Retrieved 17 September 2013.