QuickC

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QuickC
Developer(s) Microsoft
Stable release
2.51 / 1990; 27 years ago (1990)
Written in C
Operating system MS-DOS
Type IDE
License Proprietary
QuickC for Windows
Developer(s) Microsoft
Stable release
1.00 / September 1991; 25 years ago (1991-09)[1]
Written in C
Operating system Microsoft Windows
Type IDE
License Proprietary

Microsoft QuickC was a commercial integrated development environment (IDE) product engineered by Microsoft for the C programming language, superseded by Visual C++ Standard Edition.[2] Its main competitor was Borland Turbo C.[3]

QuickC was one of three Microsoft programming languages with IDEs of this type marketed in the same period, the other two being QuickBasic[4] and QuickPascal.[5][6] QuickBasic later gave rise to Visual Basic as well as being included without a linker as QBasic in later versions of MS-DOS, replacing GW Basic. QuickC is a lineal ancestor of Visual C++.[6][7][8][9][10] The three Quick language implementations were designed for power users (as opposed to professional developers, whom Microsoft supplied with programming languages in the form of expensive and more comprehensive implementations for the three languages in question as well as C++, Fortran, and Cobol) and educational use; in all three cases their major competitor was Borland with its Turbo compiler series.[11] Microsoft Macro Assembler also competes with Borland's Turbo Assembler[12]

Version history[edit]

  • QuickC 1.0, released in October 1987.[13][14] It implements the ANSI C standard and is Microsoft C 5.0 compatible.[15] CodeView is also supported.[16] The release had known compatibility issues with WD HDD controllers.[17]
  • QuickC 1.01
  • QuickC 2.0, released in January 1989.[18][19] New features included: incremental compiling and linking, improved compilation speed, built-in assembler and support for all memory models.[20] It was Microsoft C 5.1 compatible.[21]
  • QuickC 2.01, released in June 1989.[22] Quick Assembler was included in this release.[23] It was Microsoft Source Profiler compatible.[24]
  • QuickC 2.50, released in May 1990.[25]
  • QuickC 2.51, released in 1990
  • QuickC for Windows 1.0, released in September 1991.[1][26] It was the first Windows based IDE for C[27] and was also available in a bundle with Microsoft C 6.0 and Windows SDK.[28] The IDE made use of some undocumented Windows API calls.[29][30]

See also[edit]

  • QuickBASIC - similar development environment for BASIC programming

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Microsoft Readies Quick C for Windows for July Introduction". InfoWorld. May 13, 1991. p. 113. 
  2. ^ "Visual C++ adds Windows support". InfoWorld. February 22, 1993. p. 17. 
  3. ^ "Quick C vs Turbo C advertisement". InfoWorld. September 7, 1987. p. 70. 
  4. ^ QuickBasic Programmers' Toolbox
  5. ^ Quick Language Essentials, pp i-xxvii
  6. ^ a b QuickPascal Programmers' Toolbox pp 3-6
  7. ^ Gettfng Getting Started With Visual C++, intro
  8. ^ Quick C Programmers' Toolbox pp 3-6
  9. ^ QuickBasic Programmers' Toolbox pp 1-4
  10. ^ Using MS-DOS 6 Appendix III
  11. ^ Borland Turbo C
  12. ^ The Giant Black Book of Computer Viruses pp 16
  13. ^ "Microsoft Releases C Program Wares, Provides Rebates". InfoWorld. November 9, 1987. p. 29. 
  14. ^ "Quick C advertisement". InfoWorld. December 7, 1987. p. 28. 
  15. ^ "Microsoft Quick C Battles for a Better C Benefit Novice and Professional alike". InfoWorld. May 23, 1988. p. 67. 
  16. ^ "User Group Greets Microsoft's New C Products With Enthusiasm". InfoWorld. June 8, 1987. p. 73. 
  17. ^ "Microsoft Scrambles to Patch Quick C Bugs". InfoWorld. December 7, 1987. p. 3. 
  18. ^ "Early Users Pleased With Microsoft Quick C Update". InfoWorld. January 30, 1989. p. 15. 
  19. ^ "Quick C 2.0 advertisement". InfoWorld. February 6, 1989. p. 23. 
  20. ^ "Microsoft Offers Quick C Upgrade". InfoWorld. January 16, 1989. p. 15. 
  21. ^ "Six C Compilers". InfoWorld. May 22, 1989. p. 47. 
  22. ^ "Quick Assembler bundled with Microsoft's Quick C". InfoWorld. June 12, 1989. p. 24. 
  23. ^ "Microsoft Debuts Quick Assembler". InfoWorld. June 5, 1989. p. 3. 
  24. ^ "Microsoft's Source Profiler Works With Languages Conforming to Open Tools". InfoWorld. June 10, 1991. p. 22. 
  25. ^ "Microsoft Unveils C, Quick C Updates and Add-On Tools". InfoWorld. April 16, 1990. p. 13. 
  26. ^ "QuickC for Windows creates applications without using SDK". InfoWorld. September 2, 1991. p. 13. 
  27. ^ "QuickC is a one-stop development tool". InfoWorld. November 18, 1991. p. 113. 
  28. ^ "C languages: oceans apart". InfoWorld. February 3, 1992. p. 55. 
  29. ^ "Author disputes calls released by Microsoft". InfoWorld. September 14, 1992. p. 3. 
  30. ^ "Undocumented Windows calls". InfoWorld. November 16, 1992. p. 98.