Quillette

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Quillette
Quillette.png
Editor-in-chiefClaire Lehmann
Senior Editor, LondonJamie Palmer
Canadian Editor, TorontoJonathan Kay
Associate Editor, LondonToby Young
Staff writersHelen Dale
Debra W. Soh
Jeffrey Tayler[1][2]
CategoriesPolitics, culture, sciences and technology
PublisherClaire Lehmann
FounderClaire Lehmann
Year founded2015; 3 years ago (2015)
CountryAustralia
Based inSydney, Australia
LanguageEnglish
Websitequillette.com

Quillette (/kwɪˈlɛt/) is an online magazine founded by Australian writer Claire Lehmann. The publication has a primary focus on science, technology, news, culture, and politics.

Etymology[edit]

Quillette is named after the French word for a strand of wicker planted so that it takes root—used here as a metaphor for an essay.[3] Albeit, this word is no longer in use in French [4].

History[edit]

Quillette was launched in October 2015 in Sydney, Australia, by Claire Lehmann.[5][better source needed] The website drew significant public attention on August 7, 2017, after publishing the responses of four scientists (Lee Jussim, David P. Schmitt, Geoffrey Miller, and Debra W. Soh)[6] to James Damore's controversial memo "Google's Ideological Echo Chamber".[7][8][9] The website was temporarily shut down by a DDoS attack following publication of the piece.[10][11]

Reception[edit]

Quillette has been praised by a number of well known scholars and public intellectuals, such as Richard Dawkins, Steven Pinker, and Jordan Peterson, as well as developing the interest of "Australian venture capitalist Mark Carnegie".[12]

Ideology[edit]

In an interview with Psychology Today, Quillette founder Claire Lehmann said the magazine provides "an alternative to the blank slate view... very common in left-leaning media."[13] Bari Weiss has called Claire Lehmann a member of the Intellectual dark web. [14][15]

In an article for The Outline, writer Gaby Del Valle classifies Quillette as "libertarian-leaning", "academia-focused" and "a hub for reactionary thought."[16] In the Seattle newspaper, The Stranger, Katie Herzog writes that it has won praise "from both Steven Pinker and Richard Dawkins" adding that "most of the contributors are academics but the site reads more like a well researched opinion section than an academic journal."[17][18][19] In an opinion piece for USA Today, columnist Cathy Young describes Quillette as "libertarian-leaning."[20] Articles in Vice and PJ Media describe Quillette as a libertarian publication.[21][22]

Writing for The Guardian, Jason Wilson describes Quillette as "a website obsessed with the alleged war on free speech on campus".[23] Writing for The Washington Post, Aaron Hanlon describes Quillette as a "magazine obsessed with the evils of 'critical theory' and postmodernism".[24] Writing for New York's column The Daily Intelligencer Andrew Sullivan describes Quillette as "refreshingly heterodox".[25]

Additional projects[edit]

Podcast[edit]

Quillette publishes the podcast Wrongspeak, which launched in May 2018 and is hosted by Jonathan Kay and Debra W. Soh. Wrongspeak is about "the things we believe to be true but cannot say".[26][27]

Topics have included psychological differences between men and women, freedom of speech on campus, gender dysphoria in children, and American politics/culture. Notable guests have included James Damore, Lindsay Shepherd, Susan Bradley, Ed the Sock, Adrienne Batra, and David Frum.[28]

Reception[edit]

In May 2018, The Stranger praised Wrongspeak for its willingness to engage with difficult topics.[29]

Quillette Circle[edit]

In 2018 Quillette started Quillette Circle, "an international meet-up effort that creates an environment for participants to discuss topics featured on the website."[30][31]

Source of revenue[edit]

In 2018, Quillette said that they were funded mostly by contributions from readers via Patreon, and a small part (less than 5%) of the revenue came from Amazon affiliates and other advertisers.[32]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Who We Are". Quillette. June 27, 2018. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  2. ^ "About". Quillette. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  3. ^ Lehmann, Claire (July 7, 2018). "From the Editor". Quillette. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 1, 2018. In French, a synonym for quillette is bouture d’osier, which is a type of wood off-cutting used to grow new trees. An off-cutting planted in the ground that grows into a tree — this seemed to me a great metaphor for an essay.
  4. ^ "QUILLETTE : Définition de QUILLETTE". www.cnrtl.fr (in French).
  5. ^ Dale, Helen (2 June 2018). "Australia's Mistress of the Intellectual Dark Web". The Spectator. Archived from the original on September 3, 2018. Retrieved 6 June 2018. From its foundation in October 2015, ...
  6. ^ "The Google Memo: Four Scientists Respond". Quillette. August 7, 2017. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017.
  7. ^ Young, Cathy (August 8, 2017). "Googler fired for diversity memo had legit points on gender". USA Today. Archived from the original on August 8, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017.
  8. ^ Brooks, David (August 11, 2017). "Sundar Pichai Should Resign as Google's C.E.O." The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 11, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017.
  9. ^ Shermer, Michael (September 2017). "The Unfortunate Fallout of Campus Postmodernism: The roots of the current campus madness". Scientific American. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017.
  10. ^ Airaksinen, Toni (August 9, 2017). "Libertarian Site Suffers DDoS Attack After Supporting Google Worker". PJ Media. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017. Quillette Magazine, a small but respected libertarian publication based in Australia, suffered a DDoS attack Tuesday after publishing an article supportive of James Damore, the fired Google memo writer.
  11. ^ Leef, George (August 11, 2017). "Ideas (Like the Bad Ones Kids Learn in College) Have Consequences". National Review. Archived from the original on August 14, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017. A much less covered story was the taking down (at least temporarily) of a site, Quillette.com, that had posted commentary favorable to the Google engineer’s memo about the company’s diversity policies.
  12. ^
  13. ^ "Taking Risks to Move the Culture Forward". Psychology Today.[dead link]
  14. ^ Weiss, Bari (May 8, 2018). "Opinion | Meet the Renegades of the Intellectual Dark Web". The New York Times. Retrieved October 1, 2018. Other figures in the I.D.W., like Claire Lehmann, the founder and editor of the online magazine Quillette, and Debra Soh, who has a Ph.D. in neuroscience, self-deported from the academic track, sensing that the spectrum of acceptable perspectives and even areas of research was narrowing.
  15. ^ Edroso, Roy (May 14, 2018). "Conservatives Cheer the Latest Right-Wing Supergroup, the Intellectual Dark Web". The Village Voice. Archived from the original on July 3, 2018. Retrieved October 1, 2018. IDW superheroes include ... Claire Lehmann, who believes 'nationalism is the antidote to racism,' and claims to have been 'blacklisted' for 'criticizing feminism' ...
  16. ^ Del Valle, Gaby (22 September 2017). "Conservatives love playing the victim". The Outline. Archived from the original on September 23, 2017. Retrieved 20 June 2018. In an interview with Psychology Today last week, Claire Lehmann, the founder of the libertarian-leaning, academia-focused digital magazine Quillette, suggested that the website was a refuge from the political correctness and leftist bias that allegedly plague both academia and the mainstream media.
  17. ^ Herzog, Katie (May 31, 2018). "Wrongspeak Is a Safe Space for Dangerous Ideas". The Stranger. Archived from the original on June 8, 2018. Retrieved 2018-10-02. Most of the contributors are academics but the site reads more like a well researched opinion section than an academic journal.
  18. ^ Dawkins, Richard [@RichardDawkins] (July 25, 2017). "Quillette, superb online magazine, stands up for the oppressed minority who value clarity, logic and objective truth" (Tweet). Retrieved October 2, 2018 – via Twitter.
  19. ^ Pinker, Steven [@sapinker] (September 17, 2017). "The story behind Quillette, one of the most stimulating & original new web magazines" (Tweet). Retrieved October 2, 2018 – via Twitter.
  20. ^ Young, Cathy (August 8, 2018). "Googler fired for diversity memo had legit points on gender". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on August 29, 2018. Retrieved October 1, 2018. Of the four scientists who commented at Quillette, a libertarian-leaning online magazine critical of 'political correctness,' three, including neuroscientist and science writer Deborah Soh, thought the memo was almost entirely correct.
  21. ^ Airaksinen, Toni (9 August 2017). "Libertarian Site Suffers DDoS Attack After Supporting Google Worker". PJ Media. Archived from the original on June 20, 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. Quillette Magazine, a small but respected libertarian publication based in Australia, suffered a DDoS attack Tuesday after publishing an article supportive of James Damore, the fired Google memo writer.
  22. ^ Matsakis, Louise; Koeblerand, Jason; Emerson, Sarah (7 August 2017). "Here Are the Citations for the Anti-Diversity Manifesto Circulating at Google". Vice. Archived from the original on September 30, 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. The author also used news articles from outlets like The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic and The New Yorker, as well as smaller publications like libertarian magazine Quillette.
  23. ^ Wilson, Jason (18 March 2018). "How to troll the left: understanding the rightwing outrage machine". The Guardian. Archived from the original on September 6, 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018. Nevertheless, along with spreading the video, Ngo wrung from the evening an article for Quillette, a website obsessed with the alleged war on free speech on campus.
  24. ^ Hanlon, Aaron (August 31, 2018). "Postmodernism didn't cause Trump. It explains him". Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 30, 2018. Retrieved 2018-10-02. In Quillette — an online magazine obsessed with the evils of 'critical theory' and postmodernism — Matt McManus reflects on 'The Emergence and Rise of Postmodern Conservatism.'
  25. ^ Sullivan, Andrew (September 21, 2018). "America, Land of Brutal Binaries". New York. Retrieved October 3, 2018. As Claire Lehmann, the founding editor of the refreshingly heterodox new website Quillette has put it, 'the Woke Left has a moral hierarchy with white men at the bottom.'
  26. ^ "Wrongspeak". Quillette. May 14, 2018. Archived from the original on September 28, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  27. ^ Herzog, Katie (31 May 2018). "Wrongspeak Is a Safe Space for Dangerous Ideas". The Stranger. Retrieved 8 November 2018.
  28. ^ "Wrongspeak Podcast". SoundCloud. Retrieved 2018-09-30.
  29. ^ Herzog, Katie. "Wrongspeak Is a Safe Space for Dangerous Ideas". The Stranger. Retrieved 2018-09-30.
  30. ^ Beres, Derek (March 5, 2018). "These are the women behind the Intellectual Dark Web". Big Think. Archived from the original on March 5, 2018. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  31. ^ @Quillettem (February 24, 2018). ""The Quillette Circle aims to bring discussions that occur on Quillette into the real word through organising meet-ups in cities around the globe." www.facebook.com/groups/728492710693798/ …" (Tweet). Retrieved October 3, 2018 – via Twitter.
  32. ^ "Quillette is creating a platform for free thought - Patreon".

External links[edit]