RAF Breighton

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RAF Breighton
Breighton Airfield
Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg
Breighton Airfield and Aeroplane Museum.jpg
Breighton Airfield and Aeroplane Museum
IATA: noneICAO: EGBR
Summary
Owner Air Ministry 1940-1964
Private 1964-Present
Operator Royal Air Force 1940-1964
Private 1964-Present
Location Breighton, East Riding of Yorkshire
Built 1940 (1940)
In use 1942-1964 (1964)
Elevation AMSL 20 ft / 6 m
Coordinates 53°48′07″N 000°54′49″W / 53.80194°N 0.91361°W / 53.80194; -0.91361Coordinates: 53°48′07″N 000°54′49″W / 53.80194°N 0.91361°W / 53.80194; -0.91361
Map
EGBR is located in East Riding of Yorkshire
EGBR
EGBR
Location in East Riding of Yorkshire
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
11/29 0 0 Grass
00/00 0 0 Asphalt
00/00 0 0 Asphalt
00/00 0 0 Asphalt

Royal Air Force Breighton or more simply RAF Breighton is a former Royal Air Force station located near to the village of Breighton, East Riding of Yorkshire, England which is now Breighton Airfield.

History[edit]

The airfield was built between 1940 and 1942 for No. 1 Group RAF,[1] its first residents were the No. 460 Squadron RAAF.[2]

From 1959 to 1963, as part of Project Emily, the base was a launch site for three nuclear-armed PGM-17 Thor intermediate-range ballistic missiles, operated by No. 240 Squadron RAF.[3]

The base closed in March 1964, when the last active unit (which operated the Bristol Bloodhound air-defence missile) withdrew.[4]

Squadrons[edit]

Squadron Equipment From To To Notes
No. 78 Squadron RAF Handley Page Halifax II/III/VI
Douglas Dakota
16 June 1943 20 September 1945 RAF Almaza [5]
No. 112 Squadron RAF Bristol Bloodhound I 7 November 1960 31 March 1964 Disbanded [6]
No. 240 Squadron RAF PGM-17 Thor 1 August 1959 8 January 1963 Disbanded [3]
No. 460 Squadron RAAF Vickers Wellington IV
Handley Page Halifax II
Avro Lancaster I/III
4 January 1942 14 May 1943 RAF Binbrook [2]

Units[edit]

Current use[edit]

Mustangs Flying During Breighton Airshow

The original runways are covered in buildings but the outline of the runways, taxiways and dispersal stands are clearly visible using satellite imagery.[4]

A part of the airfield is currently used by the Real Aeroplane Company to house and maintain private and historic aircraft and a home for the Breighton Flying Club which uses a separate grass runway located within the original airfield grounds.[1]

Five people were injured in a helicopter crash at the airfield on 17 July 2016.[8]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Airfield history". The Real Aeroplane Company. Retrieved 27 September 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Jefford 1988, p. 93.
  3. ^ a b Jefford 1988, p. 76
  4. ^ a b Delve 2006, p. 50.
  5. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 48.
  6. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 56.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Breighton - Units". Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust. Retrieved 4 June 2016. 
  8. ^ "Five casualties after helicopter crash". BBC News. Retrieved 17 July 2016. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Delve, Ken. The Military Airfields of Britain; Northern England. Marlborough, Wiltshire, UK: Crowood Press, 1988. ISBN 1-86126-809-2.
  • Jefford, C.G, MBE,BA ,RAF (Retd). RAF Squadrons, a Comprehensive Record of the Movement and Equipment of all RAF Squadrons and their Antecedents since 1912. Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK: Airlife Publishing, 1988. ISBN 1-84037-141-2.

External links[edit]