RLU-1 Breezy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
RLU-1 Breezy
Breezy Homebuilt.jpg
Role Homebuilt aircraft
National origin United States of America
Manufacturer RLU
Designer Charles Roloff, Carl Unger, and Bob Liposky
Introduction 1964
Number built About 1000[1]
Unit cost
approximately $3065 to build in 1971[2]

The RLU-1 Breezy is a distinctive "no cockpit" high wing pusher configuration experimental aircraft designed to seat the pilot and passenger with a maximum unobstructed view.[3][4]

Design and development[edit]

Designed and built by Charles Roloff, Robert Liposky and Carl Unger, the original Breezy used a modified set of Piper PA-12 wings. Wings from the Piper PA-14, Piper PA-18, Piper J-3, Piper J-4, Piper J-5, or Cessna 172[5] can also be used on the design.[3]

Operational history[edit]

RLU-1 Breezy
Amphibious Beezy

Designer and pilot Carl Unger flew thousands of passengers for free in his Breezy prototype. The aircraft is part of the EAA AirVenture Museum collection.[6]

In 2014 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the design there was a series of special events to mark the milestone at AirVenture, including a fly-in of Breezys.[1]

Variants[edit]

Dawes Breezy
Variant with amphibious floats[7]

Specifications (Breezy)[edit]

Data from Sport Aviation

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 3
  • Length: 22 ft 6 in (6.86 m)
  • Wingspan: 33 ft (10 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)
  • Wing area: 165 sq ft (15.3 m2)
  • Fuel capacity: 10 U.S. gallons (38 L; 8.3 imp gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Continental C-90 , 90 hp (67 kW)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Grady, Mary (30 April 2014). "Breezy Pilots To Converge At Oshkosh". AVweb. Retrieved 3 May 2014. 
  2. ^ Leo J. Kohn (Winter 1971). "The true cost of building your own plane". Air Trails: 63. 
  3. ^ a b Taylor, John W. R.. Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1982-83. Jane's Publishing Company. London. 1983. ISBN 0-7106-0748-2
  4. ^ "Breezy from Aircraft Spruce". Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  5. ^ Air Trails: 16. Winter 1971.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ Dick Cavenaugh. Just about - But Not Quite. 
  7. ^ Airventure Today. 27 July 2014. p. 12.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  • Taylor, John W. R.. Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1982-83. Jane's Publishing Company. London. 1983. ISBN 0-7106-0748-2

External links[edit]