Keldysh Research Center

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from RNII)
Jump to: navigation, search
Keldysh Research Center
Federal state unitary enterprise
Founded 1933
Headquarters Moscow, Russia
Parent Roscosmos[1]
Website www.kerc.msk.ru

The State Scientific Centre Keldysh Research Center (Russian: Центр Келдыша) is a research institute in Moscow, Russia. It is based at 8 Onezhskaya street (street article in Russian Wikipedia).[2]

History[edit]

Prior to World War II it was known as the Research Institute for Jet Propulsion (Russian: Реактивный научно-исследовательский институт, translit. Reaktivnyy nauchno-issledovatel’skiy institut), and was responsible for the development of the Katyusha rocket launcher.[3]

Until 1991 it was known as the Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes (НИИ тепловых процессов, НИИТП),[4] conducting research and development in the areas of electrophysics, space instrumentation, propulsion, and power units.[3] Like other organizations formerly subordinate to the Soviet Ministry of General Machine Building, NIITP marketed its products through Obshchemashexport.[3]

It is now named after M. V. Keldysh, one of the key figures behind the Soviet space program. It is a Federal State Unitary Enterprise that is part of the Russian Space Agency. According to the World Nuclear Association, the center is developing a nuclear reactor for space to be launched in 2020.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "О мерах по созданию Государственной корпорации по космической деятельности "Роскосмос"". Pravo.gov.ru. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  2. ^ "Keldysh Research Centre, Federal Space Agency". SpaceEU. Archived from the original on 23 November 2014. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c "Russian Defense Business Directory". Federation of American Scientists. US Department of Commerce Bureau of Export Administration. May 1995. Retrieved 21 July 2017.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. ^ "История". ГНЦ ФГУП "Центр Келдыша". Retrieved 23 July 2017. 
  5. ^ http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Non-Power-Nuclear-Applications/Transport/Nuclear-Reactors-for-Space/

See also[edit]

External links[edit]