ROKS Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin (DDH-975)

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US Navy 040614-N-7293M-002 Sailors from the Republic of Korea ship ROKS Chungmugong Yi Sun Shin (DDH 975) place a "rat guard" on the bow mooring line.jpg
Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin (DDH-975) docked at Apra Harbor, Guam
History
South Korea
Name: ROKS Chungmugong Yi Sun-shin
Namesake: Yi Sun-sin
Builder: Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering
Launched: 22 May 2002
Commissioned: 2 December 2003
Status: in active service
General characteristics
Class and type: Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin-class destroyer
Displacement:
  • 4,800 t (4,700 long tons) standard
  • 5,000 t (4,900 long tons) full load
Length: 150 m (492 ft 2 in)
Beam: 17 m (55 ft 9 in)
Propulsion: Combined diesel or gas
Speed: 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Complement: 200

ROKS Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin (DDH-975) is a Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin-class destroyer in the Republic of Korea Navy. She is named after the Korean commander Yi Sun-sin.[1]

Design[edit]

Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin was part of the first batch of Chungmugong Yi Sun-sin-class destroyers that were delivered to the Republic of Korea Navy.[2] She was built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering and was launched on 22 May 2002, entering service on 2 December 2003.[2] She is about 150 metres (490 ft) long, 17 metres (56 ft) wide and displaces between 4,800 and 5,000 tons.[3] Her propulsion unit is a CODOG unit, capable of propelling her at speeds of up to 30 knots (35 mph).[3] She has a crew complement of 200.[3] Her armament consists of a 32-cell VLS (with space to install a 64-cell system),[1] a Mk 45 gun, a RAM missile, a Goalkeeper CIWS and eight Harpoon anti-ship missiles.[3] Other systems include an AN/SPS-49 radar, an MW08 radar, and a DSQ-23 sonar.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "KDX-II Chungmugong Yi Sunshin Destroyer". Global Security. Retrieved 6 February 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "KDX-II Destroyer (ship list)". GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved 6 February 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "KDX-II Destroyer (specifications)". GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved 25 January 2011.