ROSE test

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The resistivity of solvent extract (ROSE) test is a test for the presence and average concentration of soluble ionic contaminants, for example on a printed circuit board (PCB).[1][2][3][4] It was developed in the early 1970s.[5] Some manufacturers use it as part of Six Sigma processes.[3]

Some modern fluxes have low solubility in traditional ROSE solvents such as water and isopropyl alcohol, and therefore require the use of different solvents.[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Licari, James J.; Swanson, Dale W. (2011). Adhesives Technology for Electronic Applications: Materials, Processing, Reliability. William Andrew. p. 171. ISBN 978-1437778908.
  2. ^ Phil Isaacs; Jennifer Porto; Dave Braun; Terry Munson (23 February 2017). "Comparison of ionic contamination test methods to determine their ability to reliably predict performance risks". 2017 Pan Pacific Microelectronics Symposium (Pan Pacific). IEEE Xplore Digital Library. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  3. ^ a b P. Eckold; M. Routley; L. Henneken; G. Naisbitt; R. Fritsch; U. Welzel. "Process Control of Ionic Contamination Achieving 6-Sigma Criteria in The Assembly of Electronic Circuits" (PDF). Circuitinsight. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  4. ^ Hersey, R.J. Jr.; Meltzer, M.; Hofstad.H.W.; Lawrence, M.; Sanborn, R.; Arauco, H. (1 March 1995). "LLNL and TRW extend benchmark environmental stress testing for two alternative printed board cleaners". U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information. OSTI 70806. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  5. ^ "Relation Between PCBA Cleanliness and Climatic Reliability" (PDF). European Corrosion Commission. 2011. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  6. ^ Todd Rountree; Steve Stach (1 February 2018). "Problems with rose testing using today's fluxes". 2018 Pan Pacific Microelectronics Symposium (Pan Pacific). IEEE Xplore Digital Library. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  7. ^ Todd Rountree; Steve Stach. "Addressing the problems with ionic cleanliness testing on modern circuits" (PDF). Austin American Technology. Retrieved 2 March 2019.