RRS James Clark Ross

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RRS James Clark Ross Rothera.jpg
RRS James Clark Ross at Rothera wharf
History
Civil Ensign of the United Kingdom.svgUnited Kingdom
Name: James Clark Ross
Namesake: James Clark Ross
Operator: British Antarctic Survey
Builder: Swan Hunter, Wallsend, Tyne and Wear, United Kingdom
Launched: 1 December 1990 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Homeport: Stanley, Falkland Islands
Identification:
Fate: In service
Notes: [1][2][3]
General characteristics
Type: Research vessel
Tonnage: 5,732 GT
Displacement: 7,767 tonnes (loaded)
Length: 99.04 m
Beam: 18.85 m
Draught: 6.30 m
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric
  • Single shaft (8,500 shp); fixed pitch propeller
  • Azimuthing bow and stern thrusters (10 tons and 4 tonnes of thrust, respectively)
Speed: 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph)
Endurance: 57 days
Capacity:
  • 1,500 cubic metres of general cargo
  • 250 tonnes of bulk aviation fuel
  • 300 tonnes of diesel fuel.
Complement: 11 Officers and 15 Crew and up to 50 Scientific Personnel

RRS James Clark Ross is a supply and research ship operated by the British Antarctic Survey.

History[edit]

RRS James Clark Ross is named after the English explorer James Clark Ross.[4] She replaced the RRS John Biscoe in 1991.

In March 2018, RRS James Clark Ross was due to sample the marine life around the world's biggest iceberg, A-68, but was unable to reach the site due to thick sea ice in the Weddell Sea.[5]

See also[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Technical Data - RRS James Clark Ross". British Antarctic Survey. Archived from the original on 6 September 2007. Retrieved 20 August 2007. 
  2. ^ "BAS Public Information Leaflet - Ships". British Antarctic Survey. Retrieved 2007-11-24. 
  3. ^ Mike Gloistein. "RRS James Clark Ross". Archived from the original on 2008-04-06. Retrieved 2007-11-24. 
  4. ^ "RRS James Clark Ross". British Antarctic Survey. Retrieved 2007-11-24. 
  5. ^ Jonathan Amos (2 March 2018). "Mission to giant A-68 berg thwarted by sea-ice". BBC News. Retrieved 12 April 2018. 

External links[edit]