Raes Abdul Wahed

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Raes Abdul Wahed (also transliterated as Abdul Rais Wahid and Abdul Wahid) is an Afghan warlord. [1]

According to an article in the May 23, 2002 issue of Time magazine, Wahed was a Taliban commander who surrendered on January 5, 2002. Time reported that Wahed remained at large and in command of his district. Other sources report that Wahed hid Taliban leader Mullah Omar, and enabled his escape. [2][3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michael Ware (2002-05-23). "Encountering the Taliban: A TIME correspondent tracks down unrepentant anti-American forces who vow to keep fighting". Time (magazine). Retrieved 2008-07-30. Although the Kandahar government has made dramatic announcements of Taliban surrenders, many of the trumpeted capitulations have turned out later to have been shams. In Baghran in the southwestern province of Helmand, formidable Taliban General Abdul Wahid, known as Rais the Baghran, was said to have given up around Jan. 5. The next day, TIME met with the resolute Wahid. Most of his arsenal and troops remained intact. To this day he controls the district.  mirror
  2. ^ Shahzada Zulfiqar (February 2002). "The Fall and After". Newsline. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved 2008-07-30. Rais Abdul Wahid, a powerful warlord in Baghran, a Tora Bora like mountainous area, agreed to cooperate in the search in the wake of threats by US forces to bombard the area. The search met with no success and some people believe Rais may have delayed it to give Mullah Omar enough time to get away.  mirror
  3. ^ Victoria Burnett (July 11, 2004). "As a vote nears, Taliban fight on". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 2005-03-05. Retrieved 2008-07-30. For example, Afghan officials had intelligence indicating that Akhtar Mohammed Usmani, a former Taliban commander of Kandahar, and Rais Abdul Wahid, who is believed to have sheltered the Taliban leader, Mullah Omar, from coalition forces after the Taliban were forced from Kabul, are living in northern Helmand Province and financing their operations through opium, he said.