Rafat, Salfit

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For the town in the Jerusalem Governorate, see Rafat, Jerusalem.
Rafat
Other transcription(s)
 • Arabic رافات
 • Also spelled Rafat (official)
Rafat in the front, az-Zawiya behind
Rafat in the front, az-Zawiya behind
Rafat is located in the Palestinian territories
Rafat
Rafat
Location of Rafat within the Palestinian territories
Coordinates: 32°04′41″N 35°02′43″E / 32.07806°N 35.04528°E / 32.07806; 35.04528Coordinates: 32°04′41″N 35°02′43″E / 32.07806°N 35.04528°E / 32.07806; 35.04528
Palestine grid 154/164
Governorate Salfit
Government
 • Type Village council
Population (2007)
 • Jurisdiction 1,861
Name meaning Rafat, personal name, meaning "acts of kindness"[1]

Rafat (Arabic: رافات‎‎) is a Palestinian town located in the Salfit Governorate in the northern West Bank, 38 kilometers southwest of Nablus. According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, it had a population of 1,861 in 2007.[2]

Location[edit]

Rafa is located south of az-Zawiya, north east of Deir Ballut, and north west of Kafr ad-Dik.

History[edit]

Sherds from the Iron Age II, Persian, Hellenistic/Roman, Byzantine, Crusader/Ayyubid and Mamluk eras have been found here.[3][4]

A white mosaic pavements has been found here.[3]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1517, the village was included in the Ottoman empire with the rest of Palestine, and potsherds from the early Ottoman period have been found here.[3] It appeared in the 1596 tax-records as 'Arafat, located in the Nahiya of Jabal Qubal of the Liwa of Nablus. The population was 6 households, all Muslim. They paid a fixed tax rate of 33,3% on agricultural products, such as wheat, barley, summer crops, olive trees, goats and beehives, in addition to occasional revenues and a fixed tax for people of Nablus area; a total of 3,100 Akçe.[5]

In 1870 Guérin found a number of ancient cisterns, and a rectangular birket cut in the rock and measuring 15 paces long by 10 broad. He also speaks of 'several' tombs.[6]

In 1882, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described Rafat as "a semi-ruinous stone village on a ridge, apparently an ancient site, with a very conspicuous Mukam on a piece of rock west of the village, and rock-cut tombs. The water supply is from wells and cisterns."[7] They further noted: "On the north-west of the village is a steep rocky descent, in which are two tombs of the kind called 'rock-sunk', one of which is cut in a square block of rock, the top of which is levelled."[8]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Rafat had a population of 92, all Muslim,[9] increasing in the 1931 census to 127, still all Muslim, in a total of 31 houses.[10]

In 1945 the population of Rafat was 180, all Muslims,[11] while the total land area was 8,125 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[12] Of this, 1,889 dunams were used for cereals,[13] while 24 dunams were classified as built-up areas.[14]

1948-1967[edit]

In the wake of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, and after the 1949 Armistice Agreements, Rafat came under Jordanian rule.

Post-1967[edit]

After the Six-Day War in 1967, Rafat has been under Israeli occupation.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 240
  2. ^ 2007 PCBS Census Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics. p. 112
  3. ^ a b c Finkelstein et al, 1997, pp. 254-255
  4. ^ Dauphin, 1998, p. 815
  5. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 134
  6. ^ Guérin, 1875, pp. 129 -130; as given in Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 367
  7. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 286
  8. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 367
  9. ^ Barron, 1923, Table IX, p. 26
  10. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 64
  11. ^ Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 19
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 60
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 107
  14. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 157

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]