RagWing Aircraft Designs

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RagWing Aircraft Designs
Private company
Industry Aerospace
Fate Closed down
Founded 1987
Founder Roger Mann
Defunct January 2000
Headquarters Taylors, South Carolina, United States
Key people
CEO: Roger Mann
Products Aircraft plans
Aircraft kits
Website www.rogermann.org

RagWing Aircraft Designs (also called the RagWing Aeroplane Company and RagWing Aviation) was an American aircraft design and manufacturing company based in Taylors, South Carolina.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

The company was founded in 1987 and closed down in January 2000.[9]

History[edit]

Roger Mann founded RagWing after he left the United States Air Force in 1987 as a multi-service aviation company providing flight instruction, maintenance, prototype design and flight testing of homebuilt aircraft. Mann's first aircraft design was marketed in 1991 and his range of products include 14 different fixed-wing aircraft designs. In the 1990s the company provided complete aircraft kits (less engines), but since the company closed in January 2000 this has been reduced to providing plans only and builder support. Mann stated in 2012 that, "plans are still available but are mainly sold for their historical value".[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

The company's products are predominantly designs for aircraft of glued wooden construction, covered in aircraft fabric, hence the name of the company.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

Aircraft[edit]

Summary of aircraft built by RagWing Aircraft Designs
Model name First flight Number built Type
RW1 Ultra-Piet 22 (January 1999) Parasol-wing, single-seat Pietenpol Air Camper replica ultralight aircraft
RW2 Special I 5 (December 2007) Biplane, single-seat Pitts Special S-1 replica
RW4 Midwing Sport 3 (January 1999) Mid-wing, single-seat Church Midwing Sport Monoplane replica
RW5 Heath Replica 1994 Parasol-wing, single-seat Heath Parasol replica
RW6 Rag-A-Muffin 1994 Parasol-wing, single-seat ultralight aircraft
RW7 Duster Low-wing, single seat, crop duster replica
RW8 PT2S 3 (January 1999) High-wing, two-seat trainer
RW9 Motor Bipe 1 (January 1999) Biplane, single-seat ultralight
RW16 Aerial Parasol-wing, single-seat ultralight
RW11 Rag-A-Bond 4 (1998) High-wing, two-seat Piper Vagabond replica
RW19 Stork August 1997 9 (December 2007) High-wing, two-seat Fieseler Storch replica
RW20 Stork side-by-side August 1997 High-wing, two-seat Fieseler Storch replica
RW22 Tiger Moth June 1999 1 (December 2000) Biplane, two seat de Havilland Tiger Moth replica
RW26 Special II 2 (December 2007) Biplane, two seat Pitts Special S-2 replica

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cliche, Andre: Ultralight Aircraft Shopper's Guide 8th Edition, page B-49. Cybair Limited Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-9680628-1-4
  2. ^ a b c Bertrand, Noel; Rene Coulon; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2003-04, page 155. Pagefast Ltd, Lancaster OK, 2003. ISSN 1368-485X
  3. ^ a b c Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, page 234. BAI Communications. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  4. ^ a b c Downey, Julia: 1999 Plans Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 16, Number 1, January 1999, page 65. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  5. ^ a b c Downey, Julia: 2001 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 17, Number 12, December 2000, page 70. Kitplanes Acquisition Company. ISSN 0891-1851
  6. ^ a b c Downey, Julia: 2008 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 24, Number 12, December 2007, page 53. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  7. ^ a b c RagWing Aircraft Designs (2006). "RagWing Aeroplane Company". Retrieved 10 January 2011. 
  8. ^ a b c RagWing Aircraft Designs (2006). "RagWing Price List". Retrieved 29 December 2010. 
  9. ^ a b Mann, Roger (24 July 2012). "Ragwing Aeroplane". rogermann.org. Retrieved 4 March 2017. 

External links[edit]