Ragas in the Guru Granth Sahib

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A raga is a complex structure of musical melody used in the Indian classical music. It is a set of rules of how to build a melody which can ignite a certain mood[1] in the reciter and listeners. The Sikh holy scripture, Guru Granth Sahib, is composed in and divided by 60 ragas. Each raga is a chapter or section in the Guru Granth Sahib starting with Asaa raag, and all the hymns produced in Asaa raag are found in this section ordered chronologically by the Guru or other Bhagat that have written hymns in that raga. There are many websites on the internet giving wrong information about raags.

Raags (Ragas) of Sri Guru Granth Sahib The 60 Raags of Sri Guru Granth Sahib in order of appearance: 1. Asa 2. Gujari 3. Gauri Deepaki 4. Dhanasri 5. Gauri Poorabi 6. Siri 7. Majh 8. Gauri Guarairee 9. Gauri 10. Gauri Dakhani 11. Gauri Chaitee 12. Gauri Bairagan 13. Gauri Poorabi Deepaki 14. Gauri Malva 15. Gauri Mala 16. Gauri Majh 17. Gauri Sorath 18. Asavari 19. Asa Kafi 20. Asa Asavari 21. Devgandhari 22. Bihagra 23. Vadhans 24. Vadhans Dakhani 25. Sorath 26. Jaitsri 27. Todi 28. Bairarri 29. Tilang 30. Tilang Kafi 31. Suhee 32. Suhee Kafi 33. Suhee Lalit 34. Bilaval 35. Bilaval Dakhani 36. Gound 37. Bilaval Gound 38. Ramkali 39. Ramkali Dakhani 40. Nut Narayan 41. Nut 42. Mali Gaura 43. Maru 44. Maru Kafi 45. Maru Dakhani 46. Tukhari 47. Kedara 48. Bhairo 49. Basant 50. Basant Hindol 51. Sarang 52. Malhar 53. Kanra 54. Kaliyan 55. Kaliyan Bhopali 56. Parbhati 57. Parbhati Bibhas 58. Bibhas Parbhati 59. Parbhati Dakhani 60. Jaijavanti

Mishrat Raag This is when two separate raags are put together to create a new raag. For example, Raag Gauri has 12 variations: one is the original form of Raag Gauri, and the further 11 all contain the main identity and characteristic of Gauri as their foundation and are then influenced by a secondary raag.

Raag & Raagini Within the content of the Siri Guru Granth Sahib, no shabad has the definition “Raagini” in the title – all shabads clearly state “Raag” (raga), and consequently there are not 31 raags and 28 raaginis in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib as is sometimes claimed, but 60 raags of equal and independent status.

Raga: melodic scales[edit]

Ragas have a direct relationship to human moods and the following are the connections between Ragas and feeling:[citation needed]

  1. Soohi – joy and separation
  2. Bilaaval – happiness
  3. Gaund – strangeness, surprise, beauty
  4. Sri – satisfaction and balance
  5. Maajh – loss, beautification
  6. Gauri – seriousness
  7. Aasa – making effort
  8. Gujri – satisfaction, softness of heart, sadness
  9. Devgandhari – no specific feeling but the Raag has a softness
  10. Bihaagra – beautification
  11. Sorath – motivation
  12. Dhanasari – inspiration, motivation
  13. Jaitsree – softness, satisfaction, sadness
  14. Todi – this being a flexible Raag it is apt for communicating many feelings
  15. Bhairaagi – sadness, (The Gurus have, however, used it for the message of *Bhakti)
  16. Tilang – this is a favourite Raag of Muslims. It denotes feeling of beautification and yearning.
  17. Raamkali – calmness
  18. Nat Narayan – happiness
  19. Maali Gaura – happiness
  20. Maaru – giving up of cowardice
  21. Tukhari – beautification
  22. Kedara – love and beautification
  23. Bhairav – seriousness, brings stability of mind
  24. Basant – happiness
  25. Sarang – sadness
  26. Malaar – separation
  27. Jaijawanti – viraag
  28. Kalyaan – Bhakti Ras
  29. Vadhans – vairaag, loss (that is why Alahniya is sung in this Raag when someone passes away)
  30. Parbhati – Bhakti and seriousness
  31. Kaanra – Bhakti and seriousness

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Concise Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume 2. Routledge. 2013. p. 935. ISBN 9781136096020.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)