RainStor

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RainStor
Private
Industry Information Technology, Software
Fate Acquired by Teradata
Founded Founded as Clearpace in 2002 (2002); Renamed as RainStor in 2009 (2009)
Founders
  • Tom Longshaw
  • Andrew Wright
  • Jonathan Teague
  • Keith Summers
  • Gary Pratley
Headquarters San Francisco, California, United States
Website www.rainstor.com

RainStor was a software company that developed a database management system of the same name designed to manage and analyze big data for large enterprises.[1][2][3] It uses de-duplication techniques to organize the process of storing large amounts of data for reference.[4] The company's origin traces back to a special project conducted by the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defence with the purpose of storing volumes of data from years of field operations for ongoing analysis and training purposes.[1][5][6]

RainStor was headquartered in San Francisco, California, United States with R&D in Gloucester, United Kingdom. The company was acquired by Teradata in 2014.[7]

History[edit]

Originally named Clearpace, RainStor was founded in 2002 in the United Kingdom.[1] The company was originally created to exploit technology that was developed by the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defence to store big data under the brand name DeX.[1] The company rebranded DeX as NParchive, which deduplicated and archived rarely used data, in 2008.[8]

The company and product were renamed to RainStor (a portmaneteau of relational archiving infrastructure storage) in December 2009, coinciding with a move of the management office from the United Kingdom to San Francisco.[5][9] The release of version 3.5 of RainStor software, announced in May 2009, coincided with the company's rebranding.[10][11] RainStor received $7.5 million in venture funding from Storm Ventures, Doughty Hanson Technology Ventures, Informatica, and The Dow Company in March 2010. In 2011, it received some marketing awards.[12][13][14] In October 2012, RainStor received $12 million in venture funding from Credit Suisse, Doughty Hanson Technology Ventures, Storm Ventures, the Dow Chemical Company, and Rogers Venture Partners.[15]

In October 2012, the company reported over 100 clients.[1] RainStor worked with companies in the telecommunications and finance industries, as well as with government agencies.[1]

Teradata acquired RainStor in December 2014.[7] Teradata dropped the RainStor product from its portfolio in January 2016 and it is no longer developed or marketed.

Product[edit]

RainStor provided software for query and analysis against large volumes of machine generated data and an online data archive for regulatory compliance data retention.[1]

In October 2012, RainStor held two patents and was pursuing five additional patents.[1] The database uses a row/columnar hybrid repository.[16] The archived data is accessed using Structured Query Language (SQL).[16] RainStor software uses partition filtering, which excludes certain records from processing.[5]

RainStor runs on Apache Hadoop.[17][18] In June 2013, RainStor released version 5.5 of its software.[19] The release added user authentication protocols, access controls and policies, data encryption and user activity logs.[19]

In May 2014, the company announced protection for data from manipulation, malicious attacks, breaches, or deletion.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Tom Taulli (October 9, 2012). "RainStor: Riding the Big Data Wave". Forbes. Retrieved January 28, 2013. 
  2. ^ Klint Finley (October 4, 2012). "Big Data Company RainStor Raises $12 Million Series C From Credit Suisse And Rogers Venture Partners". TechCrunch. Retrieved January 28, 2013. 
  3. ^ Derrick Harris (October 4, 2012). "RainStor raises $12M to make your big data small". GigaOM. Retrieved January 28, 2013. 
  4. ^ Beyers, Tim (2014-05-18). "How HBO's "Silicon Valley" Invents the Future". The Motely Fool. Retrieved July 4, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c Chris Mellor (February 16, 2012). "Big data elephant mates with RainStor". The Register. Retrieved January 28, 2013. 
  6. ^ David Zielenziger (October 4, 2012). "RainStor, Big Data Player, Gets Extra $12M Venture Capital Investment". International Business Times. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "Teradata Acquires RainStor". Press release. December 17, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2017. 
  8. ^ Chris Mellor (November 12, 2008). "Shrinking primary databases". The Register. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  9. ^ Chris Mellor (January 20, 2010). "Will RainStor data deduplication change the database game?". Computer Weekly. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  10. ^ Robert Mullins (March 10, 2010). "Storage SaaS vendor RainStor lands $7.5. million in new funding". Venture Beat. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  11. ^ Sally Whittle (May 26, 2009). "Clearpace puts archived data in the cloud". C net. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  12. ^ "Announcing the 2011 AlwaysOn Global 250". AlwaysOn Network. July 30, 2011. Retrieved January 28, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Gartner Cool Vendors 2011". Gartner. Archived from the original on May 13, 2012. Retrieved February 13, 2017. 
  14. ^ "Announcing the 2011 OnDemand 100 Top Private Companies". AlwaysOn Network. March 30, 2011. Archived from the original on January 26, 2013. Retrieved January 28, 2013. 
  15. ^ Faith Merino (October 4, 2012). "RainStor raises $12M to compress big data". Vator News. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  16. ^ a b Landers, Garth (June 11, 2014). "Magic Quadrant for Structured Data Archiving and Application Retirement". Garter. Archived from the original on July 26, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2017. 
  17. ^ "RainStor Nabs $12M for Compressed Databases". Red Herring. October 18, 2012. Retrieved February 13, 2017. 
  18. ^ Lucas Mearian (January 18, 2012). "RainStor launches Hadoop version of enterprise database". Computer World. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  19. ^ a b Dan Kusnetzky (July 10, 2013). "RainStor releases Database 5.5 for Apache Hadoop". ZDNet. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  20. ^ "RainStor Releases Compliance Data Archive Solution". Compliance Week. May 27, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2017.