Rainier, Washington

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Rainier, Washington
Location of Rainier, Washington
Location of Rainier, Washington
Rainier, Washington is located in the United States
Rainier, Washington
Rainier, Washington
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 46°53′27″N 122°41′23″W / 46.89083°N 122.68972°W / 46.89083; -122.68972Coordinates: 46°53′27″N 122°41′23″W / 46.89083°N 122.68972°W / 46.89083; -122.68972
CountryUnited States
StateWashington
CountyThurston
Government
 • MayorRobert Shaw
Area
 • Total1.73 sq mi (4.49 km2)
 • Land1.73 sq mi (4.49 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
433 ft (132 m)
Population
 • Total1,794
 • Estimate 
(2017)[3]
2,126
 • Density1,226.77/sq mi (473.65/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
98576
Area code360
FIPS code53-57220
GNIS feature ID1507707[4]
WebsiteCity of Rainier


Rainier is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. Beginning as a train stop in the 1870s, Rainier was first settled in 1890, and was officially incorporated in 1947. The population was 1,794 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

A small white chapel in Rainier, Washington from 1896.
Church built by Gehrke brothers in 1896.

Rainier began in the 1870s as a stop on the Northern Pacific Railroad line between Kalama, Washington and Tacoma. Situated amidst the ‘ten al quelth’ prairies – Lushootseed for "the best yet" – it was named for its view of Mount Rainier.[5] In 1890, Albert and Maria Gehrke were the first permanent settlers to homestead in Rainier; later that year a store and post office were established by Henry Harmer, who homesteaded with his wife Jessie and children on the Deschutes river near Rainier.[5] Rainier was officially platted in 1891.[6]

In 1896, the community's first full-time school as well as a Lutheran church were built by Albert Gehrke and his two brothers, Theodore and Paul;[5] the buildings are now state historic landmarks.[7]

In 1906, the Bob White Lumber Company opened, bringing prosperity to the area through logging and sawmilling.[5] Other lumber companies, such as Deschutes, Gruber and Docherty, and Fir Tree, were soon attracted to the area as well. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, several of these mill operations and many of the local buildings were destroyed by a series of fires, leading many residents to seek work at Weyerhaeuser Lumber at nearby Vail, which is now a ghost town.[5]

Rainier's 1940 population was 500.[8] In 1941, the WPA Guide to Washington described Rainier as "the social center for farmers and loggers of the vicinity, although its closed mills and vacant houses mark it as a ghost lumber town."[8]

Rainier was officially incorporated on October 23, 1947.[9]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.73 square miles (4.48 km2), all of it land.[10] In terms of land cover, 18% (179 acres) of the city is urban, 27% (267 acres (1.08 km2)) is forested, and 55% (540 acres (2.2 km2)) is covered with non-forest vegetation and soils.[11]

The climate of Rainier tends to be relatively mild. Although the temperature reached a record high of 104 Fahrenheit in 1981, the average temperature of the hottest month, August, is 77 °F.[12] Similarly, while the record low temperature was -8 °F in 1979, the average temperature of January, the coldest month, is 32 Fahrenheit.[12] With an average of 8.13 inches of rainfall, November is the wettest month.[12] Rainier averages approximately 50 inches of precipitation a year.[13]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950331
1960245−26.0%
197038255.9%
1980891133.2%
199099111.2%
20001,49250.6%
20101,79420.2%
Est. 20172,126[3]18.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
2015 Estimate[15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,794 people, 656 households, and 484 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,037.0 inhabitants per square mile (400.4/km2). There were 717 housing units at an average density of 414.5 per square mile (160.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.7% White, 1.2% African American, 1.2% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from other races, and 4.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.0% of the population.

There were 656 households of which 40.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.2% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.11.

The median age in the city was 37.1 years. 26.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.2% were from 25 to 44; 29.2% were from 45 to 64; and 9.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.7% male and 50.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,492 people, 530 households, and 410 families residing in Rainier. The population density was 922.8 people per square mile (355.6/km2). There were 551 housing units at an average density of 340.8 per square mile (131.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.56% White, 0.54% African American, 1.81% Native American, 0.74% Asian, 0.27% Pacific Islander, 0.80% from other races, and 3.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.89% of the population.

There were 530 households out of which 40.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 17.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the city, the age distribution of the population shows 30.6% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 32.1% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.5 males.

The median income for a household in Rainier was $42,955, and the median income for a family was $44,226. Males had a median income of $34,609 versus $27,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,636. About 6.6% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation[edit]

A metal cutout 2-D sculpture of a soldier kneeling at the grave of a fallen comrade.
A monument at Veterans Memorial Park.

Rainier features eight acres of parks.[16] In the center of town, the Veterans Memorial Park is dedicated to "all veterans, active duty personnel, reservists of the armed services, and members of police and fire services, and any individual or group that serves our community and country."[17]

Nearby, Wilkowski Park is the site of the Rainier Roundup, the city's annual bluegrass music festival occurring on the fourth weekend in August.[18][19] Beside the park, the Yelm–Tenino Trail connects the cities of Yelm, Rainier, and Tenino in a paved pathway for walkers and bikers.[20]

Other parks in Rainier include Gehrke Park, Holiday Park, and Raintree Park.[16]

Government[edit]

The government of Rainier is comprised a mayor and a city council. In 2017, Robert Shaw became the mayor of Rainier.[21] The city council in 2010 consisted of councilmembers Kristin Guizzetti,George Johnson, Tom Arnbrister, Jonathan Stephenson, and Everett Gage.[22] Other government positions in Rainier include that of city administrator, clerk, treasurer, city attorney, fire chief, and public works director.

Education[edit]

Rainier is served by the Rainier School District. The district consists of an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school. As of May 2017, the district's enrollment was 847 students, taught by 49 teachers.[23] As of 2017, the superintendent of the district was Bryon Bahr.[23]

As of May 2017, Rainier Elementary School was serving 372 students, from kindergarten through fifth grade, with Rita Meldrum as principal.[23] The enrollment of Rainier Middle School, which serves sixth through eighth grade, was 186 as of 2017, with the principal as of 2017 being John Beckman.[23] Rainier High School, also served by principal John Beckman, included 252 students from ninth through twelfth grade in 2017.[23][24]

Community[edit]

A grade school from 1915 converted to a community center.
1915 grade school restored and converted to Lifelong Learning Center.

Under the non-profit parent corporation of the Rainier Area Building Community, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Rainier Historical Society began restoring Rainier's historic schoolhouse, which was built in 1915, and converting it into a community center known as the Lifelong Learning Center.[25] In 2005, the Rainier Food Bank was opened at the site, serving patrons on Wednesdays and Saturdays.[26] A thrift store was also opened, with the proceeds going to fund the operational costs of the building. An art gallery and public meeting rooms followed. In November 2009, the Rainier Volunteer Library opened at the center, featuring a collection of donated books available for borrowing.[27] A partnership with the Timberland Regional Library brought the addition of a computer kiosk and the ability to pick up reserved books from the Timberland Regional Library system at the Rainier Volunteer Library.[28] In the fall of 2011, the food bank, under the name Rainier Emergency Food Center, relocated to a nearby church due to safety concerns at the historic schoolhouse. The building, which had been near demolition, was returned to the school district to be used for offices in 2015, its centennial year, and the library and thrift store were closed.[29]

Rainier hosts several annual events. In August, Rainier Roundup Days include a community parade and a bluegrass music festival.[18][19] Also in August, the Rainier Community & Alumni Celebration is held to honor all past & present residents of Rainier.[30] The community regularly hosts Relay for Life, during which, over an 18-hour time frame, participants walk around the high school track to raise money for the American Cancer Society.[31][32]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-19.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ a b c d e Rainier Area of Interest. Thurston County History: People and Places. Thurston County Historic Commission. Accessed July 8, 2010.
  6. ^ "Thurston County Place Names: A Heritage Guide" (PDF). Thurston County Historical Commission. 1992. p. 70. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  7. ^ Historic Lutheran Church. RABC - Rainier Historical Society. Accessed on July 8, 2010.
  8. ^ a b Washington - A Guide to the Evergreen State, WPA American Guide Series, Washington State Historical Society, 1941
  9. ^ City Profile: City of Rainier. MRSC - Municipal Research and Services Center of Washington. July 8, 2010.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-12-19.
  11. ^ "Table VIII-1: Thurston County Land Cover, 2000." The Profile: For Thurston County; the Cities/Towns of Bucoda, Lacey, Olympia, Rainier, Tenino, Tumwater, and Yelm; and the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation and the Nisqually Indian Tribe. Thurston Regional Planning Council: November, 2009. Pg VIII-14. Accessed on July 9, 2010.
  12. ^ a b c Monthly Averages for Rainier, WA. The Weather Channel. Accessed on July 9, 2010.
  13. ^ "Rainier, WA". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  14. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved October 11, 2013.
  15. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 19, 2016. Retrieved July 10, 2016.
  16. ^ a b "Table VIII-8: Municipal Parks by Jurisdiction, 2009." The Profile: For Thurston County; the Cities/Towns of Bucoda, Lacey, Olympia, Rainier, Tenino, Tumwater, and Yelm; and the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation and the Nisqually Indian Tribe. Thurston Regional Planning Council: November, 2009. Pg VIII-24. Accessed on July 9, 2010.
  17. ^ Veterans Park: Tile Order Form. City of Rainier. Accessed on July 8, 2010.
  18. ^ a b The Rainier Roundup - August 20, 21, 22 & 23, 2009. RABC-Rainier Historical Society. Accessed on July 8, 2010.
  19. ^ a b Northwest Festivals. March 11, 2010. Inland Northwest Bluegrass Association. Accessed on July 8, 2010.
  20. ^ Yelm-Tenino Trail. Thurston County: Parks & Recreation. Accessed on July 8, 2010.
  21. ^ Kollar, Andrew; Wagar, Michael (November 8, 2017). "Foster Retained as Mayor of Yelm". Nisqually Valley News. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  22. ^ "Meet the City Council". City of Rainier, Washington. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  23. ^ a b c d e "Washington State Report Card". Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  24. ^ "District Home". Rainier School District. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  25. ^ Lifelong Learning Center. RABC-Rainier Historical Society. Accessed on July 9. 2010.
  26. ^ Truscott, Seth. "Rainier Food Bank turning a year old." Nisqually Valley News. May 26, 2006. Section B5.
  27. ^ About Us. Rainier Volunteer Library. Accessed on July 9, 2010.
  28. ^ Scott, Tyler. "Check out Rainier's new library" The Olympian. April 27, 2010. Accessed on July 9, 2010.
  29. ^ "Current News". Rainier Historical Society. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  30. ^ Rainier Community & Alumni Celebration August 7 & 8, 2010. RABC - Rainier Historical Society. Accessed July 9, 2010.
  31. ^ Huey, Tyler. "Relay for Life is July 10–11 at Rainier High School track." Nisqually Valley News. July 2, 2010. Section C.
  32. ^ 2010 Relay For Life of SE Thurston WA. Relay For Life: American Cancer Society. Accessed on July 9, 2010.

External links[edit]