Raisa Smetanina

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Raisa Smetanina
RR5110-0128R.jpg
Smetanina on a 2013 Russian coin
Country Russia
Born29 February 1952 (1952-02-29) (age 67)
Mokhcha, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Height1.62 m (5 ft 4 in)
Ski clubVSS
World Cup career
Seasons19821992
Individual wins3
Team wins3
Indiv. podiums16
Team podiums9
Indiv. starts52
Team starts10
Overall titles0 – (2nd in 1984)

Raisa Petrovna Smetanina (Russian: Раиса Петровна Сметанина; born 29 February 1952) is a former Soviet/Russian cross-country skiing champion. Smetanina is an ethnic Komi. She is the first woman in history to win ten Winter Olympic medals (Stefania Belmondo being the second, Marit Bjørgen the third, and Ireen Wüst the fourth). Smetanina took part in five Olympics, representing the USSR team four times and the Unified Team once. In particular, Smetanina won two gold and one silver medals at the 1976 Winter Olympics, becoming the most successful athlete there, along with Rosi Mittermaier of West Germany.[1]

In the 1992 Winter Olympics, at the age of thirty-nine, Smetanina won a further gold medal competing for the Unified Team in the 4×5 km, becoming the first woman to win ten Winter Olympic medals and at that time the oldest woman to win a Winter Olympic gold.

Smetanina also had successes at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships, winning four golds (20 km (1982), and 4×5 km (1974, 1985, and 1991), three silvers (10 km (1978), and 4×5 km (1982, 1989)), and four bronzes (4×5 km (1978), 5 km (1974, 1978), and 20 km (1980)). She also won three times at the Holmenkollen ski festival, once in the 10 km (1975) and twice in the 5 km (1975 and 1979).

In 1979, Smetanina received the Holmenkollen medal (shared with Erik Håker and Ingemar Stenmark).[1] She was also awarded Order of Friendship of Peoples (1984).[2]

World Cup results[edit]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[3]

World Cup standings[edit]

 Season   Age  Overall
1982 30 21
1983 31 8
1984 32 2
1985 33 8
1986 34 14
1987 35 10
1988 36 6
1989 37 11
1990 38 13
1991 39 14
1992 40 18

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 3 victories
  • 16 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1 1981–82 26 February 1982 Norway Oslo, Norway 20 km Individual World Championships[1] 1st
2  1982–83  5 March 1983 Finland Lahti, Finland 5 km Individual World Cup 2nd
3  1983–84  9 February 1984 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo, Yugoslavia 10 km Individual Olympic Games[1] 2nd
4 18 February 1984 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sarajevo, Yugoslavia 20 km Individual Olympic Games[1] 2nd
5 25 February 1984 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual World Cup 1st
6 3 March 1984 Finland Lahti, Finland 5 km Individual World Cup 2nd
7 8 March 1984 Norway Oslo, Norway 20 km Individual World Cup 3rd
8 24 March 1984 Soviet Union Murmansk, Soviet Union 10 km Individual World Cup 2nd
9 1984–85 23 February 1985 Soviet Union Syktyvkar, Soviet Union 20 km Individual World Cup 1st
10  1985–86  15 February 1986 West Germany Oberstdorf, West Germany 20 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
11 22 February 1986 Soviet Union Kavgolovo, Soviet Union 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
12  1986–87  21 March 1987 Norway Oslo, Norway 20 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
13  1987–88  19 December 1987 West Germany Reit im Winkl, Yugoslavia 5 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
14 14 February 1988 Canada Calgary, Canada 10 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 2nd
15 25 February 1988 Canada Calgary, Canada 20 km Individual F Olympic Games[1] 3rd
16  1989–90  14 January 1990 Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union 7.5 km Individual C World Cup 2nd

Team podiums[edit]

  • 3 victories
  • 9 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammates
1  1981–82  24 February 1982 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 × 5 km Relay World Championships[1] 2nd Lyadova / Zabolotskaya / Kulakova
2  1983–84  26 February 1984 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 × 5 km Relay World Cup 3rd Markashanskaya / Zimyatova / Burlakova
3 1984–85 22 January 1985 Austria Seefeld, Austria 4 × 5 km Relay World Championships[1] 1st Tikhonova / Vasilchenko / Reztsova
4  1988–89  22 February 1989 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 × 5 km Relay C/F World Championships[1] 2nd Shamshurina / Tikhonova / Välbe
5 12 March 1989 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 × 5 km Relay C World Cup 2nd Lazutina / Tikhonova / Välbe
6  1989–90  4 March 1990 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 × 5 km Relay F World Cup 2nd Nageykina / Yegorova / Lazutina
7 1990–91 15 February 1991 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 4 × 5 km Relay C/F World Championships[1] 1st Yegorova / Tikhonova / Välbe
8 15 March 1991 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 × 5 km Relay C/F World Cup 2nd Nageykina / Tikhonova / Välbe
9 1991–92 18 February 1992 France Albertville, France 4 × 5 km Relay C/F Olympic Games[1] 1st Välbe / Lazutina / Yegorova

Note: 1 Until the 1999 World Championships and the 1994 Olympics, World Championship and Olympic races were included in the World Cup scoring system.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Raisa Smetanina". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC.
  2. ^ Panorama of the 1984 Sports Year (in Russian). Moscow: Physical Culture and Sports publisher. 1985. p. 38.
  3. ^ "Athlete : SMETANINA Raissa". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 25 March 2018.

External links[edit]

Records
Preceded by
Herself
Athlete with the most medals at Winter Olympics
14 February 1998 – 17 February 1998
With: Bjørn Dæhlie
Succeeded by
Norway Bjørn Dæhlie
Preceded by
Herself with Sweden Sixten Jernberg
Athlete with the most medals at Winter Olympics
17 February 1992 – 14 February 1998
Succeeded by
Herself with Norway Bjørn Dæhlie
Preceded by
Sweden Sixten Jernberg
Athlete with the most medals at Winter Olympics
25 February 1988 – 17 February 1992
With: Sixten Jernberg
Succeeded by
Herself