Rally Bulgaria

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Kimi Räikkönen in SS7 Lyubnitsa - 41st Rally Bulgaria 2010
Dimitar Iliev is the second Bulgarian pilot to win the rally (in 2007) after Ilia Chubrikov. Iliev won for the second time in 2012 as well.
Krum Donchev won for the first time in 2008. He, together with Iliev, also has won the event twice, the second time in 2014.

Rally Bulgaria (Рали България) is the most prestigious and also the oldest rally event in Republic of Bulgaria. It was confirmed for the 2010 World Rally Championship season as the seventh of all thirteen planned events. Year 2010 was also the first and so far the only one that Rally Bulgaria has been in the World Rally Championship, having previously hosted races for the European Rally Championship[1] instead. The application of the country was accepted by the FIA despite the fact that Rally Bulgaria's candidate event in July 2009 ended in an accident which killed Italian co-driver Flavio Guglielmini[2] and seriously injured Swiss driver Brian Lavio.[1] Bulgaria was the only new candidate for the 2010 World Rally Championship season, although Rally Argentina had made a reserve application just in case Bulgarian rally failed.[2]

The latest HQ of the rally is town of Samokov (2013-2015) and the route of the event contains special stages in Bulgaria's Sofia Province and Pazardzhik Province. The route, including some of the special stages, passes through the famous Borovets ski resort which was HQ from 2002 to 2012, meaning that it has also hosted the 2010 World Rally Championship season[3] event.

A brief history of the Bulgarian Motorsport[edit]

Through the years Bulgarians have always been interested in the motorsport in one way or another. For the first Bulgarian Motorsport event is considered the 1914 race held around the capital Sofia and the winner there was Bulgarian Dimitar Pehlivanov. Many years of various motorsport events followed after this first try and every time the races grew bigger and more complicated than the previous ones.

Initially only Bulgarian, year by year, the events acquired international status because of the participation of pilots firstly from the Balkan Peninsula countries (Romania, former Yugoslavia, Greece and Turkey), then from the former Soviet Union countries (like Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, etc.), and later - from most of the West European countries (West Germany, Belgium, Netherlands, France, Italy, Spain, etc.).

The first years of the Bulgarian Motorsport have been the years when the car, as a necessity, was not a normal thing as it is today. In this initial period (from the end of the 19th Century until the mid 20th Century) the motorsport in Bulgaria was a privilege only for limited number of people – dealers, owners of factories or service-stations, and some enthusiasts (mechanics, chauffeurs, etc.).

The second period of nation’s motorsport development had begun in the mid 1950s, when the automobiles in Bulgaria were already comparatively widespread. The newest history of the Bulgarian Motorsport dates back to 1958 when the Bulgarian Automobile Tourist Club (BATC) was established. A year later, in 1959, the first true rally event has been organised. Its start was in the capital Sofia and the itinerary covered 275 km in the West and North-West of the country.

In the next 1960 it has been decided that the Bulgarian Rally Championship for that year would be proceeded as a "Circuit of Bulgaria". The first motorsport activity, which shows the interest of the Bulgarian women in the sport – the inaugural ladies' rally "8th of March" – was held in 1961. The first Kart Race has been organised two years later - in 1963, while in the following 1964 the Renault Factory in Plovdiv (the second biggest town in Bulgaria) opened its doors having great positive influence in the Bulgarian Motorsport later on.

One by one, different rally events appeared some years later and several of them became traditional rounds of the Bulgarian Rally Championship:

But preceding all of the above-mentioned rallies, in the summer of 1970, the first International Rally Zlatni Piassatsi (translated: Rally Golden Sands) has been organised in the famous Bulgarian summer resort of the same name, as 36 crews from Bulgaria, Poland, former Yugoslavia and East Germany took the start. In the following years the rally has changed its name several times (Rally Zlatni, Rally Albena, etc.), while in 2002 it has also generally changed its location as well - from the glamouros and sunny Bulgarian coastline to the heart of the gorgeous Rila Mountain - some 500 km to the West - in the Borovets ski resort. Since then (despite in 2013 the HQ moved another 10 km to the North-West in town of Samokov) the rally is known as Rally Bulgaria.

From Rally Zlatni Piassatsi 1970 to Rally Bulgaria 2015[edit]

Rally Bulgaria is the oldest and most prestigious motorsport event in Republic of Bulgaria. There are evidences that the first unofficial edition of the rally was in 1965, but the first ever official Rally Zlatni Piassatsi (translated: Rally Golden Sands) has started on 12 June 1970 in front of Hotel International which is located in the sea resort of the same name - Zlatni Piassatsi (Golden Sands resort). Just year and a half later the rally commission of the then Fédération Internationale du Sport Automobile (FISA) confirmed it as a part of the European Rally Championship. The rally was the first event to run a closed (circuit like) special stage - a characteristic feature of the rally included in its first official running back in 1970.

In 1975 the rally was awarded with coefficient 3 (the highest then was coefficient 4). Another three years later and on 10 October 1978 the rally commission of FISA awarded it with the 4 "stars" of difficulty after the fact that the Bulgarian rally has gathered a total of 123.5 points. On the same date the event was also included in the 10 super European rallies, which determined the European Rally Championship of that time. After all the positives, in 1979, FISA took back one of the fours stars, because of "weaknesses in the organisation", as the observers have written on the past rally report.

In 1984 the HQ of the rally moved from Zlatni Piassatsi sea resort to its neighbor resort Albena (both held near third biggest town in BulgariaVarna). Four years later FISA awarded the Bulgarian rally again with the highest coefficient of difficulty, which by this time was already 20. Since then, until 2003 including, the rally was fixed in the highest group of rallies with coefficient 20, which made up the calendar of the European Rally Championship. From 2004 to 2009 including the rally continued to be part of this highest group of rallies, but FIA decided to remove the coefficients and the championship was named just European Rally Championship, while the coefficients were left only for the then European Rally Cup (now European Rally Trophy). In both 2008 and 2009 Rally Bulgaria was also a World Rally Championship Candidate Event.

As a matter of fact, in all runnings of the event until 2002, less than 1/5 of the itinerary was based around the HQ resorts. The most of it was rather located in the Balkan Mountains around towns of Sliven and Shoumen with their emblematic stages like "Stara Reka" (translated: "Old River"), "Bulgarka", "Tvarditsa-Elena", "Varbitsa", and many others…

Corrado Fontana and his co-driver Renzo Casazza during Rally Bulgaria 2008 on SS "Sestrimo" and its beautiful scenery at 2000 m above sea level along Belmeken Dam.

The big change had to happen after the observers of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA - the new name of the international motorsport federation) recommended to avoid the long road sections which connected the seaside with the mountain stages – between 150 and 250 km in one direction.

So, from 2002 on the rally changed its name one more time and from Rally Albena (the last name from 2001) it became Rally Bulgaria. This also came with the change of the location of the event as well – after 32 years on the seaside, the new HQ was based about 500 km to the West - in the ski resort Borovets, which is located in the Rila Mountain. The route of the rally, of course, was completely new which caused many discussions among the participants and keen rally fans whether the change was good or not. Despite that, over the years, the rally "created" its new famous places like the so-called "Turkish Parking" and the road along the picturesque Belmeken Dam.

Year 2010 marked the pinnacle of the Bulgarian rally sport - Rally Bulgaria became part of the World Rally Championship calendar for the very first time. It was long awaited achievement and at the end all people involved were satisfied that it has finally happened.

For 2011 and 2012 the rally went back to the European Rally Championship, while in 2013 it counted only for the then European Rally Cup with coefficient 20 which name was changed to European Rally Trophy for 2014. The coefficient was also changed - from 20 it became 4 (as in the old times), but it was equal, of course, to 2013's already former coefficient 20. In 2015 Rally Bulgaria will count one more time for the European Rally Trophy with the highest coefficient - 4.

A bit earlier, in 2013, Rally Bulgaria changed its HQ one more time, but on that occasion it was just 10 km to the North-West of Borovets - in town of Samokov. The HQ was there also in 2014 and will remain there for the 46th edition of the event this year - 2015.

Validity of the rally[edit]

Year(s) Valid for
1970–1971 Bulgarian Rally Championship
1972-1974 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers

Soviet Union Rally Championship

1975–1976 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 3)

Soviet Union Rally Championship – Cup "Peace & Friendship"

1977–1981

&

1982-1983

Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers

(with coefficient 3 in 1977-1978 and 1980-1981,

with coefficient 4 in 1979 alone and from 1982 on)

Soviet Union Rally Championship – Cup "Peace & Friendship"

Romanian Rally Championship

Turkish Rally Championship

Greek Rally Championship

1984-1986 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 4)

European Rally Championship for Group A drivers

Soviet Union Rally Championship – Cup "Peace & Friendship"

Romanian Rally Championship

Turkish Rally Championship

Greek Rally Championship

1987 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 4)

Soviet Union Rally Championship – Cup "Peace & Friendship"

1988-1989 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 20)

European Rally Championship for Group N drivers

Soviet Union Rally Championship – Cup "Peace & Friendship"

1990 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 20)

European Rally Championship for Group N drivers

Soviet Union Rally Championship – Cup "Peace & Friendship"

Belgium Rally Championship

1991-1992 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 20)

European Rally Championship for Group N drivers

1993–1995 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 20)

European Rally Championship for Group N drivers

FIA European Rally Cup for drivers

1996–1997 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship

for drivers & makes (coefficient 20)

European Rally Championship for Group N drivers

FIA European Rally Cup for drivers

Balkan Rally Championship for drivers

1998–1999 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship

for drivers & makes (coefficient 20)

FIA European Rally Cup for drivers

Balkan Rally Championship for drivers

2000 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship

for drivers & makes (coefficient 20)

FIA European Rally Cup for drivers

Balkan Rally Championship for drivers

2001 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship

for drivers & makes (coefficient 20)

2002 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers (coefficient 20)

European Rally Championship for Super 1600 drivers

2003–2007 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers

2008 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers

World Rally Championship Candidate Event

2009 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers

2WD European Rally Cup

Pirelli Star Driver - Qualification

World Rally Championship Candidate Event

2010 World Rally Championship

Junior World Rally Championship

2011-2012 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Championship for drivers

2013 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Cup for drivers (coefficient 20)

2014-2015 Bulgarian Rally Championship

European Rally Trophy for drivers (coefficient 4)

Recent events[edit]

Rally Bulgaria 2002, 24–26 May[edit]

The 33rd edition of the rally was an all new event, because of the change of HQ’s location – more than 500 km West from Zlatni Piassatsi and Albena sea resorts in the heart of Rila Mountain, where the new HQ Borovets ski resort is situated. The change was a necessity for the event in order to save its coefficient 20 for the European Rally Championship.

The rally was much more compact than the previous one, despite some of the new stages were not so technical like the classics of the previous event. Nevertheless, the new stages were also very good and the bigger part of them offered almost a completely new challenge to the competitors.

Rally Bulgaria 2002 was the only event in the whole history of the rally, which consisted of three full competitive Legs, despite the first of them was comparatively short one (just less than 60 km of special stages).

Rally route led the competitors to stages, which have never been used before in another rally (Leg 1 & Leg 2), but also to stages, which are very famous from another event of the Bulgarian Rally ChampionshipRally Hebros (Leg 3).

List of stages: Leg 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 1 8.66
SS2 Tunela 9.41
SS3 Dolno Varshilo 7.80
SS4 Topolnitsa 7.78
SS5 Eledzhik 17.91
SS6 Raduil 1 8.16

Leg 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS7 Borovets 2 8.66
SS8 Mаtivir 1 17.82
SS9 Yazovira 1 7.28
SS10 Gorno Varshilo 1 7.88
SS11 Trayanovi Vrata 1 8.97
SS12 Tsarska Bistritsa 1 6.82
SS13 Mаtivir 2 17.82
SS14 Yazovira 2 7.28
SS15 Gorno Varshilo 2 7.88
SS16 Trayanovi Vrata 2 8.97
SS17 Raduil 2 8.88
SS18 Tsarska Bistritsa 2 6.82

Leg 3

Number Name Length (km)
SS19 Sveti Konstantin 1 31.96
SS20 Rekata 1 12.11
SS21 Dobra Voda 1 31.66
SS22 Rekata 2 12.11
SS23 Sveti Konstantin 2 31.96
SS24 Dobra Voda 2 8.83

Rally Bulgaria 2003, 13–15 June[edit]

The second running over the new route was in 2003. Despite this, the 34th edition of Rally Bulgaria was very different from the 33rd. In fact, every rally since 2003, except 2006 and 2009, is more or less the same with this 34th edition of the event. As a beginning, the rally was in two competitive Legs again.

For the first time in 2003 it was introduced a short special stage on the streets of the HQ resort Borovets, which carried the same name. The other new stages were "Sestrimo" and "Yundola", and also their reverse variants, which were with different length, called "Belmeken" and "Belovo" respectively. Interesting fact is that "Sestrimo" stage climbs up to 2000m above the sea level and the turbo cars are struggling on the highest points of the stage, because of the rarefied air.

Some of the stages from 2002 like "Borovets" stage of that time (it wasn’t so much on the streets of the resort and was more like ordinary longer stage), "Raduil", which was the reversed variant of "Borovets", and also "Tsarska Bistritsa" were completely removed from the itinerary for 2003 and have never been used since then. In fact, a part of "Tsarska Bistritsa" stage has been used as a shakedown for the next four years.

All of the stages from Leg 3 of Rally Bulgaria 2002 were completely removed from the itinerary too and have also never been used in the event since then (but in 2010 the bigger part of the will be back in the rally).

The short stages from 2002, like the pair "Tunela" and "Dolno Varshilo", and the next pair "Topolnitsa" and "Eledzhik" were saved in the rally (and have been used ever since), but the change there was the following: both stages from the pairs were connected to each other and lengthened as well. The stage, which emerged from the first pair, was "Magistrala", while the other stage was "Tserovo". The same happened with their reverse variants – the pair "Gorno Varshilo" and "Trayanovi Vrata" became "Slavovitsa", while the last pair "Mativir" and "Yazovira" was named "Muhovo".

List of stages: Leg 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 3.04
SS2 Muhovo 29.20
SS3 Slavovitsa 18.50
SS4 Sestrimo 1 31.95
SS5 Yundola 1 18.70
SS6 Sestrimo 2 31.95
SS7 Yundola 2 18.70

Leg 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS8 Magistrala 1 18.30
SS9 Tserovo 1 29.30
SS10 Magistrala 2 18.30
SS11 Tserovo 2 29.30
SS12 Belovo 18.60
SS13 Belmeken 23.67

Rally Bulgaria 2004, 18–19 June[edit]

With about 38% of special stages, the route from 2003 was perfect. So, the organizers of the rally decided that the 35th Rally Bulgaria 2004 will be running over the same itinerary, which has been chosen in 2003.

The only different stuff in 2004 was the little change of the length of the special stages (just with some meters ar as much as a kilometer), but all this was insignificant.

For a Shakedown of the rally was chosen a 4-kilometer part of the former "Tsarska Bistritsa" stage, which in 2002 was included in Leg 2 of the rally as SS12/SS18.

List of stages:

Leg 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 2.95
SS2 Muhovo 28.89
SS3 Slavovitsa 18.24
SS4 Sestrimo 1 31.98
SS5 Yundola 1 18.57
SS6 Sestrimo 2 31.98
SS7 Yundola 2 18.57

Leg 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS8 Magistrala 1 18.24
SS9 Tserovo 1 29.08
SS10 Magistrala 2 18.24
SS11 Tserovo 2 29.08
SS12 Belovo 18.44
SS13 Belmeken 22.27

Rally Bulgaria 2005, 8–10 July[edit]

36th Rally Bulgaria 2005 was the same as the previous two events from 2003 and 2004. This time the difference between the closest rally (this one from 2004) in terms of stages was only one – "Sestrimo" stage was shortened by a bit less than 2 kilometers. The shakedown was also the same.

List of stages: Leg 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 2.95
SS2 Muhovo 28.89
SS3 Slavovitsa 18.24
SS4 Sestrimo 1 30.11
SS5 Yundola 1 18.57
SS6 Sestrimo 2 30.11
SS7 Yundola 2 18.57

Leg 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS8 Magistrala 1 18.24
SS9 Tserovo 1 29.08
SS10 Magistrala 2 18.24
SS11 Tserovo 2 29.08
SS12 Belovo 18.44
SS13 Belmeken 22.27

Rally Bulgaria 2006, 7–9 July[edit]

Young Georgy Tanev with his experienced co-driver Petar Sivov on 30.11-kilometer SS6 Sestrimo 2

This edition of Rally Bulgaria was the first after 2003, where there was more significant change. This change was the introducing of a brand-new stage, which has never been used before – it was "Veligrad" (12.70 km) stage and its reverse variant, named "Varvara" (also 12.70 km).

But this stage came more as rescuing attempt for rally’s itinerary than anything else. The organizers were forced to put this stage on the place of another one – "Yundola" and its reversed variant "Belovo", which was closed by the authorities for repairs.

The 30.11-kilometer variant of "Sestrimo" stage went down well in the last edition of the rally and organizers decided to save it as it was used in 2005. The Shakedown was also the same as the last few editions of the rally.

List of stages: Leg 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 2.95
SS2 Muhovo 28.89
SS3 Slavovitsa 18.24
SS4 Sestrimo 1 30.11
SS5 Velingrad 1 12.70
SS6 Sestrimo 2 30.11
SS7 Velingrad 2 12.70

Leg 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS8 Magistrala 1 18.24
SS9 Tserovo 1 29.08
SS10 Magistrala 2 18.24
SS11 Tserovo 2 29.08
SS12 Varvara 12.70
SS13 Belmeken 22.27

Rally Bulgaria 2007, 6–8 July[edit]

Beautiful nature around Belmeken Dam (parts of the stage can be seen in the left of the dam and in the middle of the picture on the mountain)
Simon Jean-Joseph and Jack Boyere on SS7 Yundola 2

For the next 2007 organizers decided to put "Yundola" (and reversed "Belovo") stage back in the itinerary after the road repairs were already finished. So, the "Velingrad" (and reversed "Varvara") stage were removed and the route of the rally went back to its already classical shape last used in 2005.

At least, there was a difference if we compare the 2007 itinerary with that one from 2005 – the renovated "Yundola" stage was shortened by 170m, while its reversed variant "Belovo" was lengthened by 160m. Apart from that, the shakedown test remained on its usual place – on the 4-kilometer part of the former "Tsarska Bistritsa" stage.

List of stages: Leg 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 2.95
SS2 Muhovo 28.89
SS3 Slavovitsa 18.24
SS4 Sestrimo 1 30.11
SS5 Yundola 1 18.40
SS6 Sestrimo 2 30.11
SS7 Yundola 2 18.40

Leg 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS8 Magistrala 1 18.24
SS9 Tserovo 1 29.08
SS10 Magistrala 2 18.24
SS11 Tserovo 2 29.08
SS12 Belovo 18.60
SS13 Belmeken 22.27

Rally Bulgaria 2008, 11–13 July[edit]

In 2008 the rally was a World Rally Championship Candidate Event for the first time in its history. For that reason months before the rally, FIA sent some of their experts to Borovets in order to explore resort’s possibilities to welcome a rally event from this class.

Of course, itinerary in the shape from 2003 to 2007 wouldn’t be enough to form the required at that time 340–380 km of special stages for WRC event, so the searching for new stages (with alternative and escape roads) was the main objective to the organizers, which FIA’s experts appointed.

The other change was the location of the shakedown test, because the one, used till 2007, was too far from the main Service Park of the rally (for that reason it had its "own" Service Park, which was a minus to the rally).

Antonín Tlusták and Jan Skaloud having problems on 2000m above the sea – on SS6 Sestrimo 2

Unfortunately, the new shakedown, which an expert from FIA chose, later was considered as the weakest point of Rally Bulgaria 2008. Despite it was very well situated to the main Service Park (just about 4.5 km away), the test was too fast and with too long straits, which had nothing in common with the characteristics of the stages. That was the reason why it was the first and probably the last time this shakedown was used.

Another change in the rally, which was more formal and on paper than anything else, was introduction of three competitive Days again (the term Leg was removed). But the first Day consisted of only SS1 Borovets (2.95 km), which was run alone on Friday late afternoon.

As for the stages, the itinerary of the 39th Rally Bulgaria 2008 was absolutely the same as this one from the year before.

List of stages: Days 1 & 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Borovets 2.95
SS2 Muhovo 28.89
SS3 Slavovitsa 18.24
SS4 Sestrimo 1 30.11
SS5 Yundola 1 18.40
SS6 Sestrimo 2 30.11
SS7 Yundola 2 18.40

Day 3

Number Name Length (km)
SS8 Magistrala 1 18.24
SS9 Tserovo 1 29.08
SS10 Magistrala 2 18.24
SS11 Tserovo 2 29.08
SS12 Belovo 18.60
SS13 Belmeken 22.27

Rally Bulgaria 2009, 17–19 July[edit]

The 40th anniversary of Rally Bulgaria was the most important event of its history. The year 2009 marked the running of the event, from which depended if it will be part of the 2010 World Rally Championship or not.

For that reason there were more significant changes made in the itinerary since 2002. As a beginning, the most noticeable change was the absence of the shortest stage of the event – "Borovets". Instead, the rally started right off with the proper long stages, first of which was the reverse running of "Sestrimo" stage, which in the past (from 2003 to 2008) was called "Belmeken", and was driven as a last stage of the whole rally. For 2009 it was renamed "Lakavitsa" and was shortened with about 2 kilometers. Next stages were the already traditional "Muhovo" and "Slavovitsa", which we were used to see as the openers of this first competitive Day. The changes didn’t skip them and both were shortened as well – "Muhovo" was cut with 380m, while "Slavovitsa" was reduced with just 120m. But despite the unusual itinerary and the little changes made on the stages, all of the first Day’s tests were well known to the competitors. What was going to be the new stuff of the rally would be seen on the next Day 2.

The second Day of Rally Bulgaria 2009 offered some brand-new roads, which weren’t stages alone, but when connected with some previously used ones, made up almost new stages together. This was the case with "Sestrimo" stage, which saved its name, and which was Day 2’s opener, but was really shortened from its start. In comparison with 2008, when it was 30.11 kilometers, in 2009 stage’s length was "only" 23.68 km, as the first 17.87 km of them were completely new. After this new experience, the road joined with the well known last part of "Sestrimo" stage, which runs all along the Belmeken Dam till the finish. The next stage "Yundola" was longer with just 90m than in 2008, so the change there was insignificant.

Next of the itinerary was the stage, which we knew as "Tserovo" (the reversed variant of "Muhovo" stage). Like the new "Sestrimo", "Tserovo" also had big changes – it was shortened a bit by its start, but was seriously reduced by its finish (with almost 9 km). The main difference with the old "Tserovo" stage was its brand-new middle part, which passed through the village of Lyubnitsa, and which was exactly 8.95 kilometers long. This part was also the reason that the stage would be renamed after the village – "Lyubnitsa".

Rally cars were gathered in the entrance of the Service Park after the cancelling of the rally

The Shakedown test was also brand new, but like 2008 it was close to the main Service Park of the rally (just 6 km away). Shakedown’s only "disadvantage" was its length of only 2.58 km, but despite this the Shakedown had everything – slow turns, fast straights, and road, which was open on some places and narrow on other.

But the rally sport sometimes could be really dangerous – on the opening stage of rally’s second competitive Day the Swiss driver Brian Lavio and his Italian co-driver Flavio Guglielmini crashed heavily approximately 10 km into the new part of "Sestrimo" stage. Unfortunately, this crash costed the life of Flavio Guglielmini, who died immediately. As a result, firstly the other crews refused to continue the race, as these ones, who started the stage in front of Lavio and Guglielmini’s car passed non-competitively through the next two stages before the Service Park – "Yundola" and "Lyubnitsa" – in order to cover 50% of rally’s competitive kilometers. The others went back to the Service Park through the alternative road of "Sestrimo" stage, and when all of the crews gathered there, the rally was announced cancelled with a pro-term winner Giandomenico Basso (previously co-driven by late Flavio Guglielmini). The ceremonial finish was also cancelled.

List of stages: Day 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Lakavitsa 1 20.41
SS2 Muhovo 1 28.51
SS3 Slavovitsa 1 18.12
SS4 Lakavitsa 2 20.41
SS5 Muhovo 2 28.51
SS6 Slavovitsa 2 18.12

Day 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS7 Sestrimo 1 23.68
SS8 Yundola 1 18.49
SS9 Lyubnitsa 1 24.00
SS10 Sestrimo 2 23.68
SS11 Yundola 2 18.49
SS12 Lyubnitsa 2 24.00

Rally Bulgaria 2010, 9–11 July[edit]

In 2010, the 41st Rally Bulgaria celebrated a remarkable edition of its history – the event was part of the World Rally Championship (WRC) for the first time since rally’s initial running in 1970. For that reason Rally Bulgaria had to reply all the requirements of the FIA in order to be part of the WRC. One of the most important of them is the competitive kilometeres, which, in its previous editions, were appropriate only for the European Rally Championship (250–270 km), for which the rally counted. Now FIA requires additional about 50 to 100 km by the Bulgarian rally. The organizers have solved this problem by adding some of the special stages around towns of Peshtera and Batak, last run 8 years ago, in 2002, which was the first time, when Borovets ski resort was the host of the rally. Interesting fact is that these stages are also part of another rally of the Bulgarian Rally Championship – International Rally Hebros.

One of the biggest differences in comparison with 2009 is the absence of "Yundola" stage (and also its reversed variant "Belovo"). It was the only SS from last year without any alternative or escape road, because it was located in a mountain gorge with rocks on the one side of the road and river and rocks on the other.

As it is written above, some of the stages around towns of Peshtera and Batak will be used for the first time since 2002. Their names will be changed since the 33rd edition of the rally 8 years ago, while one of them (SS6/SS9 Peshtera) will be run also differently and will be shortened as well.

The Shakedown remains the same as in 2009 (despite it will be a bit lengthened), when it was used for the first time. The test stage will be situated between town of Momin Prohod and Gorna Vassilitsa village and will be 2.65 km long.

DAY 1:

SS1 of the rally will be "Batak Lake 1" (actually it is not a lake, but a dam). It will be the same as SS21 Dobra Voda 1 from Rally Bulgaria 2002, which also was the last SS of Rally Hebros 2009. An interesting fact is that this stage, with its almost 32 km, is the longest of the rally.

Then follows SS2 Belmeken Lake 1 (it is also a dam, rather than a lake). This stage covers much of the road of 2009’s SS1/SS4 Lakavitsa. The finish point is the same as the year before, but stage's initial 7 kilometers are brand new. They have never been used as a part of a special stage before (since 2003 they have been a liaison section only). This year the stage is 27.57 km long rather than the 20.41 km of SS1/SS4 Lakavitsa in 2009. Another thing, raising interest here, is that in the half of the stage the rally reaches its highest point of 2059 meters above the sea level, which makes the rally maybe the highest event of the 2010 WRC after Rally Mexico.

Then a Service Park follows, after which the crews repeat both specials stages.

DAY 2:

The second competitive Day of Rally Bulgaria 2010 is the longest of the three in both terms of special stages and liaison sections.

It will start with SS5 Sestrimo 1, which, in 2010, will be 27.46 km long. The initial about 7 km of the stage were last used as a competitive mileage back in 2008 as part of the already classical 30.11-kilometer "Sestrimo" stage, while in 2009 they were only liaison section. Now, after those first kilometers, the competitors will turn right to the new part of the stage, firstly introduced in 2009. "Sestrimo" stage will finish just at the foot of Belmeken Dam’s wall and will be run for the first time in such a variant.

The initial 9 km of the next SS6 Peshtera 1 will be the same as these of SS19/SS23 Sveti Konstantin from Rally Bulgaria 2002. After those first 9 km, the competitors will reach a junction and will turn right to begin the second part of the stage, which will use the first section of SS1/SS3 Batak Lake (another 9 km), but in a reverse direction – donwhilling. Actually, the finish point of "Peshtera" stage is on the same place as the start point of SS1/SS3 Batak Lake. SS6/SS9 Pesthera is 18.13 km in length.

SS7 Lyubnitsa 1 is 99% the same as in 2009, when its brand-new middle part was introduced. Unfortunately, after the accident of the mixed Swiss/Italian crew of Bryan Lavio and Flavio Guglielmini, which has happened on one of the preceding Special Stages and where the co-driver Guglielmini died, SS Lyubnitsa was only passed non-competitively by some of the crews. The only difference this year is that the stage will be extended by 860m and will be 24.86 km in length.

Then a Service Park follows, after which the crews repeat the specials stages.

DAY 3:

Day 3 is the most compact day of the whole rally, and we even could say that maybe it will be the most compact of the whole 2010 World Rally Championship. If we exclude the final liaison section from the closing Service Park to the HQ, Day 3 would have between 50% and 60% of Special Stages. So, with this closing road section, the competitive kilometers will be 48.41% of Day 3’s itinerary.

The final competitive Day of the event is built by two stages, repeated twice – the classics SS11/SS13 Muhovo (29.53 km) and SS12/SS14 Slavovitsa (17.73 km). In comparison with 2009, Muhovo was 28.51 km, while Slavovitsa – 18.12 km, which means that this year Muhovo is extended by 1.02 km, but Slavovitsa – shortened by 390m.

These two stages, as well as "Lyubnitsa" stage from Day 2 (which is largery made by SS Muhovo’s route), are the only stages, which don’t have such a mountainous character like the rest of the tests. The highest point of the Day, which is part of SS Muhovo, and also is the finish point of SS Lyubnitsa, is just 861m. The majority of the competitive kilometers though are situated between 300 and 700 meters above sea level.

Interesting fact is that the route of "Slavovitsa" stage is located next to one of the busiest highways in Bulgaria – Trakya Highway, which connects the two biggest cities in the country – the capital Sofia and the second after it Plovdiv. Through short tunnels, the stage twists several times from right to the left under the highway.

Both runnings of the stages, of course, are separated by a Service Park. The last break in the Service is scheduled to be after the second loop through the stages, while later the crews will head for the Ceremonial Finish of the rally in front of the HQ Hotel Rila in the heart of Borovets.

List of stages: Day 1

Number Name Length (km)
SS1 Batak Lake 1 31.77
SS2 Belmeken Lake 1 27.57
SS3 Batak Lake 2 31.77
SS4 Belmeken Lake 2 27.57

Day 2

Number Name Length (km)
SS5 Sestrimo 1 27.46
SS6 Peshtera 1 18.13
SS7 Lyubnitsa 1 24.86
SS8 Sestrimo 2 27.46
SS9 Peshtera 2 18.13
SS10 Lyubnitsa 2 24.86

Day 3

Number Name Length (km)
SS11 Muhovo 1 29.53
SS12 Slavovitsa 1 17.73
SS13 Muhovo 2 29.53
SS14 Slavovitsa 2 17.73

For the record, this is, so far, the last WRC event in Bulgaria.

Past winners[edit]

1970–1986[edit]

Edition Year Driver Co-Driver Nation Car
1st 1970 Reiner Altenheimer Hellenz Koller Germany Porsche 911
2nd 1971 Ilia Tchoubrikov Kolio Tchoubrikov Bulgaria Alpine-Renault A110 1600
3rd 1972 Sobieslaw Zasada Richard Ziskowski Poland Porsche 911
4th 1973 Sergio Barbasio Luigi Macaluso Italy Fiat 124 Abarth
5th 1974 Attila Ferjancz Jeno Zsemberi Hungary Renault 12 Gordini
6th 1975 Fulvio Bacchelli Bruno Scabini Italy Fiat 124 Abarth
7th 1976 Andrzej Jaroszewicz Bruno Scabini Poland Lancia Stratos HF
8th 1977 Reiner Alterheimer Horwik Dieter Germany Porsche Carrera
9th 1978 Franz Wittmann Helmut Deimel Austria Opel Kadett
10th 1979 Antonio Zanini Juan José Petisco Spain Fiat Abarth 131
11th 1980 Antonio Zanini Jordi Sabater Spain Porsche 911 C
12th 1981 Adartico Vudafieri Arnaldo Bernacchini Italy Fiat Abarth 131
13th 1982 Andrea Zanussi Arnaldo Bernacchini Italy Fiat Abarth 131
14th 1983 Antonio Zanini Pedro Carcia Spain Talbot Lotus
15th 1984 Carlo Capone Sergio Cresto Italy Lancia 037 Rally
16th 1985 Dario Cerrato Giuseppe Cerri Italy Lancia 037 Rally
17th 1986 Benigno Fernandez José López Orozco Spain Opel Manta 400

1987–2014[edit]

Rally name Stages Podium finishers
Rank Driver
Co-driver
Team
Car
Time
18th Rally Albena – Zlatni Piassatsi – Sliven
9 to 10 May 1987
Round 14 of the 1987 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 4)
28 stages
1 Belgium Patrick Snijers
Belgium Dany Colebunders
Belgium Bastos Texaco Rally Team
Italy Lancia Delta HF 4WD
3:51:51
2 Bulgaria Stoyan Kolev
Bulgaria Boyko Ignatov
Bulgaria Camel Club
Germany Audi 80 Quattro
3:54:45
+2:54
3 Poland Andrzej Koper
Poland Krzysztof Gęborys
France Renault 11 Turbo 4:00:02
+8:11
19th Rally Albena – Zlatni Piassatsi – Sliven
14 to 15 May 1988
Round 13 of the 1988 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
28 stages
338.50 km
1 Italy Fabio Arletti
Italy Leonardo Julli
Italy Astra
Italy Lancia Delta HF 4WD
3:43:29
2 Italy Michele Rayneri
Italy Aldo Cigala
Germany Audi Coupé Quattro 3:44:08
+0:39
3 Bulgaria Stoyan Kolev
Bulgaria Boyko Ignatov
Germany Audi Coupé Quattro 3:50:04
+6:35
20th Rally Albena – Zlatni Piassatsi
13 to 15 May 1989
Round 16 of the 1989 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
28 stages
1 Belgium Robert Droogmans
Belgium Ronny Joosten
Belgium Fina Ford Rally Team
United Kingdom Ford Sierra RS Cosworth
3:35:27
2 France Yves Loubet
France Jean-Marc Andrié
Italy H.F. Grifone
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale
3:39:27
+4:00
3 Italy Piero Liatti
Italy Maurizio Imerito
Italy H.F. Grifone
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale
3:40:44
+5:17
21st Rally Albena – Zlatni Piassatsi
12 to 13 May 1990
Round 17 of the 1990 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
27 stages
1 Italy Fabrizio Tabaton
Italy Maurizio Imerito
Italy H.F. Grifone
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale 16V
3:05:41
2 Belgium Robert Droogmans
Belgium Ronny Joosten
Italy Jolly Club
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale 16V
3:05:43
+0:02
3 Belgium Patrick Snijers
Belgium Dany Colebunders
Japan Toyota Celica GT-Four ST165 3:05:44
+0:03
22nd International Rally Zlatni
11 to 12 May 1991
Round 16 of the 1991 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
30 stages
1 Italy Piero Liatti
Italy Luciano Tedeschini
Italy A.R.T. Engineering
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale 16V
3:08:08
2 Italy Fabrizio Tabaton
Italy Maurizio Imerito
Italy H.F. Grifone
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale 16V
3:08:36
+0:28
3 Italy Enrico Bertone
Italy Gianfranco Imerito
Italy H.F. Grifone
Italy Lancia Delta Integrale 16V
3:17:03
+8:55
23rd International Rally Zlatni
9 to 10 May 1992
Round 14 of the 1992 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
30 stages
331 km
1 Germany Erwin Weber
Germany Manfred Hiemer
Germany Team Mitsubishi Motors Deutschland
Japan Mitsubishi Galant VR-4
3:06:21
2 Austria Christoph Dirtl
Austria Jörg Pattermann
Italy Lancia Delta HF Integrale 3:12:26
+6:05
3 Poland Marian Bublewicz
Poland Grzegorz Gac
Poland Marlboro Team Poland
United Kingdom Ford Sierra RS Cosworth
3:16:28
+10:07
24th International Rally Zlatni
8 to 9 May 1993
Round 12 of the 1993 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
30 stages
331 km
1 France César Baroni
France Hervé Sauvage
Italy Astra
Italy Lancia Delta HF Integrale
3:20:17
2 Bulgaria Georgi Ivanov
Bulgaria Ivan Tonev
Germany Volkswagen Golf GTI 16V 3:32:49
+12:32
3 Germany Hermann Gaßner
Germany Harald Brock
Japan Mitsubishi Galant VR-4 3:35:25
+15:08
25th International Rally Zlatni
14 to 15 May 1994
Round 18 of the 1994 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
30 stages
331 km
1 Belgium Patrick Snijers
Belgium Dany Colebunders
Belgium Bastos Ford Credit
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth
3:02:26
2 Italy Vanio Pasquali
Italy Luciano Tedeschini
Italy ProMotor Sport
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth
3:04:02
+1:36
3 Italy Sergio Pianezzola
Italy Lucio Baggio
Italy H.F. Grifone
Italy Lancia Delta HF Integrale
3:09:43
+7:17
26th International Rally Zlatni
13 to 14 May 1995
Round 12 of the 1995 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
31 stages
371.20 km
1 Italy Enrico Bertone
Italy Max Chiapponi
Japan Toyota Celica Turbo 4WD 3:33:12
2 Bulgaria Georgi Ivanov
Bulgaria Ivan Tonev
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth 3:36:59
+3:47
3 Italy Piergiorgio Bedini
Italy Luca Bonvicini
Italy Jolly Club
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth
3:42:25
+9:13
27th Rally Zlatni Piassatsi
11 to 12 May 1996
Round 12 of the 1996 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
31 stages
1 Italy Enrico Bertone
Italy Max Chiapponi
Czech Republic Czech National Team
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth
3:33:36
2 France Yves Loubet
Czech Republic Michal Kočí
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth 3:34:36
+1:00
3 Austria Kurt Göttlicher
Austria Josef Pointinger
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth 3:39:20
+5:44
28th Rally Albena – Bulgaria
17 to 18 May 1997
Round 17 of the 1997 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
31 stages
1 Poland Krzysztof Hołowczyc
Poland Maciej Wisławski
Poland Stomil Olsztyn Mobil 1 Rally Team
Japan Subaru Impreza 555
3:00:45
2 Italy Gianmarino Zenere
Italy Sauro Farnocchia
Italy Procar
Japan Subaru Impreza 555
3:04:15
+3:30
3 Turkey Volkan Işık
Turkey Erkan Bodur
Turkey Marlboro Ford Mobil Racing Team
United Kingdom Ford Escort WRC
3:06:48
+6:03
29th Rally Albena – Bulgaria
15 to 17 May 1998
Round 16 of the 1998 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
31 stages
1 Italy Alex Fiorio
Italy Nadia Mazzon
Italy Jolly Club
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth
3:14:07.0
2 Italy Nicola Caldani
Italy Alessandro Giusti
United Kingdom Ford Escort RS Cosworth 3:16:25.4
+2:18.4
3 Russia Sergey Baldikov
Russia Anton Zinoviev
Ukraine Aleksandrov Rally Team
Japan Subaru Impreza 555
3:17:04.7
+2:57.7
30th Rally Albena – Bulgaria
21 to 23 May 1999
Round 17 of the 1999 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
28 stages
1 Italy Enrico Bertone
Italy Nicola Arena
Czech Republic AK Czech Pro Motorsports
France Renault Mégane Maxi
2:34:23.5
2 Czech Republic Pavel Sibera
Czech Republic Petr Gross
Czech Republic Škoda Motorsport
Czech Republic Škoda Octavia Kit Car
2:39:00.8
+4:37.3
3 Turkey Serdar Bostancı
Turkey Cihat Gürkan
Turkey Ford Motorsport Turkey
United Kingdom Ford Escort WRC
2:40:18.5
+5:55.0
31st Rally Albena
19 to 21 May 2000
Round 15 of the 2000 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
28 stages
1 Belgium Bruno Thiry
Belgium Stéphane Prévot
Belgium Automobiles Citroën
France Citroën Xsara Kit Car
2:29:58.4
2 Denmark Henrik Lundgaard
Denmark Jens Christian Anker
Denmark Toyota Castrol Team Denmark
Japan Toyota Corolla WRC
2:30:03.5
+5.1
3 Bulgaria Jassen Popov
Bulgaria Dilyan Popov
Bulgaria Bulrace
Japan Toyota Celica GT-Four
2:34:43.2
+4:44.8
32nd Rally Bulgaria – Albena
18 to 20 May 2001
Round 14 of the 2001 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
28 stages
1 Germany Armin Kremer
Germany Fred Berßen
Japan Toyota Corolla WRC 2:31:21.5
2 Russia Aleksandr Potapov
Russia Ilona Nakutis
Russia Itera
Japan Subaru Impreza WRC
2:32:13.6
+52.1
3 Italy Enrico Bertone
Italy Elisabetta Cavenaghi
Italy Procom Motorsports
France Peugeot 306 Maxi
2:33:38.1
+2:16.6
33rd Rally Bulgaria – Albena
24 to 26 May 2002
Round 12 of the 2002 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
24 stages
303.49 km
1 Poland Leszek Kuzaj
Belgium Erwin Mombaerts
Japan Toyota Corolla WRC 2:56:57.0
2 Poland Janusz Kulig
Poland Jarek Baran
Italy Jolly Club
United Kingdom Ford Focus WRC
2:57:54.1
+57.1
3 Russia Aleksandr Lesnikov
Russia Andrey Rusov
Russia Itera
Japan Subaru Impreza WRC
3:02:29.4
+5:32.4
34th Rally Bulgaria
13 to 15 June 2003
Round 18 of the 2003 FIA European Rally Championship season (coefficient 20)
13 stages
289.51 km
1 Belgium Bruno Thiry
Belgium Jean-Marc Fortin
Belgium Peugeot Bastos Racing Team
France Peugeot 206 WRC
2:46:21.5
2 Bulgaria Jassen Popov
Bulgaria Dilyan Popov
Austria OMV Emotion Racing Team
Czech Republic Škoda Octavia WRC
2:52:23.8
+6:02.3
3 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Rumen Manolov
France Peugeot 306 Maxi 2:57:15.5
+10:54.0
35th Rally Bulgaria
18 to 19 June 2004
Round 3 of the 2004 FIA European Rally Championship season
13 stages
286.53 km
1 Italy Luca Pedersoli
Italy Daniele Vernuccio
Italy Peugeot Italy
France Peugeot 306 Maxi
2:44:34.6
2 France Simon Jean-Joseph
France Jack Boyère
France Renault Sport
France Renault Clio S1600
2:45:26.0
+51.2
3 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Stoyko Valchev
Bulgaria Interspeed Nova Generazia
France Peugeot 306 Maxi
2:46:36.3
+2:01.5
36th Rally Bulgaria
8 to 10 July 2005
Round 4 of the 2005 FIA European Rally Championship season
13 stages
282.79 km
1 Italy Giandomenico Basso
Italy Mitia Dotta
Italy Procar
Italy Fiat Punto Super 1600
2:49:12.6
2 France Simon Jean-Joseph
France Jack Boyère
France Oreca
France Renault Clio S1600
2:49:32.5
+19.9
3 Bulgaria Dimitar Iliev
Bulgaria Yanaki Yanakiev
Bulgaria Boyla Auto Motor Sport
Japan Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 7
2:53:38.9
+4:26.3
37th Rally Bulgaria
7 to 9 July 2006
Round 5 of the 2006 FIA European Rally Championship season
13 stages
265.31 km
1 Italy Giandomenico Basso
Italy Mitia Dotta
Italy New Business 16
Italy Fiat Grande Punto Abarth Super 2000
2:31:58.9
2 Bulgaria Dimitar Iliev
Bulgaria Yanaki Yanakiev
Bulgaria Boyla Auto Motor Sport
Japan Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 9
2:33:27.4
+1:28.5
3 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Stoyko Valchev
Bulgaria Interspeed Nova Generazia
Japan Subaru Impreza WRX STI
2:33:52.5
+1:53.6
38th Rally Bulgaria
6 to 8 July 2007
Round 6 of the 2007 FIA European Rally Championship season
13 stages
282.61 km
1 Bulgaria Dimitar Iliev
Bulgaria Yanaki Yanakiev
Bulgaria Boyla Auto Motor Sport
Japan Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 9
2:42:50.2
2 France Simon Jean-Joseph
France Jack Boyère
France Citroën C2 Super 1600 2:43:08.1
+17.9
3 Bulgaria Jassen Popov
Bulgaria Dilyan Popov
Bulgaria Bulrace
Japan Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 9
2:43:34.6
+44.4
39th Rally Bulgaria
11 to 13 July 2008
Round of the 2008 FIA European Rally Championship season
13 stages
282.61 km
1 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Stoyko Valchev
Bulgaria Prista Oil Rally Team
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
2:42:01.8
2 Turkey Volkan Işık
Turkey Kaan Ozsenler
Turkey Fiat Motorsport
Italy Fiat Grande Punto Super 2000
2:42:08.0
+6.2
3 Poland Michal Solowow
Poland Maciek Baran
Poland Cersanit Rally Team
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
2:43:35.4
+1:33.6
40th Rally Bulgaria
17 to 19 July 2009
Round of the 2009 FIA European Rally Championship season
  • the rally was suspended after SS7 of 13 due to the crash of Brian Lavio and Flavio Guglielmini, where co-driver Guglielmini died.
12 stages
266.42 km
1 Italy Giandomenico Basso
Italy Mitia Dotta
Italy Giandomenico Basso
Italy Fiat Grande Punto Abarth Super 2000
1:32:16.7
2 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Petar Yordanov
Bulgaria Prista Oil Rally Team
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
1:33:45.1
+1:28.4
3 Italy Corrado Fontana
Italy Carlo Cassina
Italy Corrado Fontana
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
1:34:17.1
+2:00.4
41st Rally Bulgaria
09 to 11 July 2010
Round 7 of the 2010 FIA World Rally Championship season
14 stages
353.58 km
1 France Sébastien Loeb
Monaco Daniel Elena
France Citroën World Rally Team
France Citroën C4 WRC
3:02:39.2
2 Spain Daniel Sordo
Spain Marc Martí
France Citroën World Rally Team
France Citroën C4 WRC
+3:03:08.7
+29.5
3 Norway Petter Solberg
United Kingdom Chris Patterson
Norway Petter Solberg World Rally Team
France Citroën C4 WRC
3:03:15.5
+36.3
42nd Rally Bulgaria
08 to 10 July 2011
Round 5 of the 2011 FIA European Rally Championship season
10 stages
258.96 km
1 Italy Luca Rossetti
Italy Matteo Chiarcossi
Italy National Proklama
Italy Fiat Grande Punto Abarth Super 2000
2:28:35.9
2 Bulgaria Petar Gyoshev
Bulgaria Dimitar Spasov
Bulgaria Prestige
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
2:28:43.2
+7.3
3 Italy Luca Betti
Italy Maurizio Barone
Italy Luca Betti
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
2:29:18.0
+42.1
43rd Rally Bulgaria
08 to 10 June 2012
Round 4 of the 2012 FIA European Rally Championship season
12 stages
252.59 km
1 Bulgaria Dimitar Iliev
Bulgaria Yanaki Yanakiev
Bulgaria Vivacom Rally Team
Czech Republic Škoda Fabia Super 2000
2:20:26.5
2 Bulgaria Petar Gyoshev
Bulgaria Dimitar Spasov
Bulgaria Prestige
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
2:20:49.3
+22.8
3 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Petar Yordanov
Bulgaria Globul Rally Team
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
2:21:28.1
+1:01.6
44th Rally Bulgaria
05 to 7 July 2013
Round 5 of the 2013 FIA European Rally Cup season (coefficient 20)
13 stages
197.55 km
1 Ukraine Oleksandr Saliuk jr.
Ukraine Yevgen Chervonenko
Kazakhstan Astana European Rally Team
Czech Republic Škoda Fabia Super 2000
1:56:06.1
2 Bulgaria Dimitar Iliev
Bulgaria Yanaki Yanakiev
Bulgaria Vivacom Rally Team
Czech Republic Škoda Fabia Super 2000
1:56:26.1
+20.0
3 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Petar Yordanov
Bulgaria Globul Rally Team
France Peugeot 207 Super 2000
1:57:15.7
+1:09.6
45th Rally Bulgaria
18 to 20 July 2014
Round 6 of the 2014 FIA European Rally Trophy season (coefficient 4)
14 stages
193.95 km
1 Bulgaria Krum Donchev
Bulgaria Petar Yordanov
Bulgaria Globul Rally Team
United Kingdom Ford Fiesta R5
1:52:47.0
2 Ukraine Oleksandr Saliuk jr.
Ukraine Yevgen Chervonenko
Ukraine Oleksandr Saliuk jr.
United Kingdom Ford Fiesta R5
1:53:11.7
+24.7
3 Turkey Yagiz Avci
Turkey Bahadir Gücenmez
Turkey Toksport
United Kingdom Mini Cooper RRC
1:55:20.7
+2:33.7
46th Rally Bulgaria
17 to 19 July 2015
Round 6 of the 2015 FIA European Rally Trophy season (coefficient 4)
14 stages
195.91 km
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -

See also[edit]

Rally Bulgaria 2011 on RALLYLIFE.cz

  1. ^ a b "Rally Bulgaria put on WRC calendar for 2010, official says". The Echo. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 
  2. ^ a b World Rally Championship events agreed "2010 World Rally Championship events agreed" Check |url= value (help). FIA World Rally Championship. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 
  3. ^ "Rally Bulgaria enters the World Rally Championship in 2010". Bulgaria Gazette. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 

External links[edit]

Used literature[edit]

"Rally Bulgaria History" – Tsvetelina Manolova