Ralph Dunn

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Ralph Dunn
Born(1900-05-23)May 23, 1900
DiedFebruary 19, 1968(1968-02-19) (aged 67)
OccupationActor
Years active1932–1967[1]
Spouse(s)Pat West (?–1944; divorced)

Ralph Dunn (May 23, 1900 – February 19, 1968) was an American film, television, and stage actor.

Early years[edit]

Dunn was born in Titusville, Pennsylvania. His father was a veterinarian for the U.S. Army during World War I, and his mother was an actress. Dunn was enrolled briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, but left after a short time to join a vaudeville troupe.

Career[edit]

Dunn's Broadway debut was in 1927 in the show Chicago, as replacement for original cast member Arthur Vinton.[citation needed] His other Broadway credits included Once for the Asking (1963), Tenderloin (1960), Happy Town (1959), Make a Million (1958), The Pajama Game (1954), Room Service (1953), The Moon Is Blue (1951), An Enemy of the People (1950), and The Seventh Heart (1927).[2]

Dunn used his burly body and rich, theatrical voice to good effect in hundreds of minor feature-film roles and supporting appearances in two-reel comedies. He came to Hollywood during the early talkie era, beginning his film career with 1932's The Crowd Roars.

A large man with a withering glare, Dunn was an ideal "opposite" for short, bumbling comedians. A frequent visitor to the Columbia short subjects unit, Dunn showed up in the Three Stooges comedy Mummy's Dummies, as well as Who Done It? and its remake, For Crimin' Out Loud.

Dunn kept busy into the 1960s, appearing in TV series such as Kitty Foyle and Norby, and films such as Black Like Me.

Personal life[edit]

Dunn was married to actress Pat West. They divorced on May 12, 1944.[3]

Death[edit]

On February 19, 1968, Dunn died in Flushing, New York.[2]

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Answers.com | Ralph Dunn
  2. ^ a b "Ralph Dunn". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on 8 April 2019. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  3. ^ "Divorces". Billboard. May 27, 1944. p. 32. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  4. ^ Great Movie Musicals on DVD - A Classic Movie Fan's Guide by John Howard Reid - Google search with book preview

External links[edit]