Ralph Humphrey

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Ralph Humphrey
Born
Ralph Humphrey

(1932-04-14)April 14, 1932
DiedJuly 14, 1990(1990-07-14) (aged 58)
NationalityAmerican
EducationYoungstown State University
Known forPainting
MovementAbstract expressionism
Minimalism

Ralph Humphrey (April 14, 1932 – July 14, 1990) was an American abstract painter whose work has been linked to both Abstract Expressionism and Minimalism.[1][2] He was active in the New York art scene in the 1960s and '70s. His paintings are best summarized as an exploration of space through color and structure. He lived and worked in New York, NY.

He is not to be confused with the percussionist Ralph Humphrey, best known for being the drummer of The Mothers Of Invention from 1973 until 1974.

Biography[edit]

Ralph Humphrey studied at Youngstown State University.[1] He moved to New York in 1957 and immediately became a part of the art scene that was known, at the time, for Abstract Expressionism.[1] He met artists such as Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, Frank Stella, Robert Ryman, and Ellsworth Kelly, who would end up having a large influence on his work.[3] Humphrey was a prominent member of the generation of artists who laid the groundwork for American art in the 1970s and 60s.[1] From 1966 until his death in 1990, he taught painting in the graduate department at Hunter College.

Artistic style[edit]

Humphrey’s artistic style went through several phases and developments, which can be roughly outlined in the following way: monochromes from 1957–60; frame paintings 1961–65; shaped canvases 1967–70; constructed paintings 1971–1990.[4] Throughout these phases, Humphrey kept a keen eye on color, light, and space while he moved between abstraction and representation. As Kenneth Baker explains in Art in America in 1984, “Each of his works defines an ideal viewing distance that can be discovered only by patient observation of the focus of the details, the resolution of the image and the proper relationship between body and object. Finding the apt distance from which to contemplate Humphrey’s new paints is thus not something you do discursively: it is an exercise in feeling your way silently towards a correct spatial interval.” [3]

1957–1960[edit]

Reviewing Humphrey’s show at Tibor de Nagy in 1960, Donald Judd said, of his monochromes, “They are large, subtle and single-colored. This is Purism of a sort, in which generality does not contain variables but excludes them, in which the basic diagram or color, the only continuity, is exposed, here the essence of a confused sequence of perceptions.”[5] Donald Judd also likened these canvases to the work of Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and Josef Albers.

1961–1965[edit]

Neil A. Levine wrote in 1965 about Humphrey’s solo exhibition at Green Gallery, where he showed some of his frame paintings. Levine said, “His new work is serious and demanding. All the paintings are variations on one theme. The theme is, simply stated, an expansive, lightly brushed, large grey field…surrounded by a painted framing edge…”[6] Here, Neil, too, references Albers, as well as TV screens, unfilled billboards, and Rothko.[6]

1967–1970[edit]

Robert Pincus-Whitten reviewed Humphrey’s 1969 show at Bykert Gallery, where his shaped canvases were hung. Pincus-Whitten explains how Humphrey created “a luminous cosmos of fragile exhalations, painted on large squares or horizontal rectangles, softly turned at the corner and curved back into the stretcher.”[7] These canvases are noteworthy, too, for their use of day-glow colors. At this time, his work becomes increasingly more atmospheric than his previous efforts; multi-colored wavy lines and sprayed colors replace solid geometric fields of single colors.

1971–1990[edit]

The last definable phase of his artistic style approaches representation at times, sometimes calling to mind an open window. These constructed paintings also border on sculpture, often coming ten inches out from the wall, directly confronting the viewer in real space. The paint, too, is considerably built up, giving the surface of the paintings considerable texture that was not previously seen in his work. Ellen Schwartz writes in 1977 about his show at John Weber, where his constructed paintings were still abstract: “Humphrey’s latest works, meditative rather than communicative, require the suspension of conscious efforts to grasp them before they will yield their secrets, which lay within ourselves all the while. The rich blue variegated surfaces are like blotters onto which we pour our own fantasies.”[8] D Phillips, writing about his Willard Gallery show in 1982, explains how his constructed paintings are natural extensions of the earlier frame paintings: “Frames-within-frames have long provided the structural basis for Humphrey’s colorful designs; he has simply made his window allusion literal.” She explains, too, that these paintings are a step forward: “The shift does, however, bring greater variety and complexity to the artist’s constructions. There is a more explicit sense of space, of indoors and outdoors.”[9] Beyond content, we see Humphrey using a brighter color palette and inserting vaguely figurative, whimsical patterns onto the surface.[3] Yet, by the mid 1980s, the paintings return to a more ambiguous, abstract state.[3]

Exhibitions[edit]

Since his first solo exhibition at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York City in 1959, Humphrey’s work has been the subject of 40 solo shows. During his lifetime, he had been represented by Green Gallery, Bykert Gallery, Andre Emmerich Gallery, Willard Gallery, and John Weber Gallery.[1]

Solo exhibitions have continued to be mounted since his death in 1990, including Ralph Humphrey: Frame Paintings, 1964 to 1965 at Mary Boone Gallery, New York City, September 8–October 6, 1990 and Ralph Humphrey: Conveyance at Gary Snyder Gallery, April 2 – May 16, 2015.[10][11] Other exhibitions have been held elsewhere in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Boston.

Humphrey's paintings have also been in group shows such as Systemic Painting at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1966, The Structure of Color at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1971, the 1979 Biennial at the Whitney Museum, and High Times, Hard Times: New York Painting, 1967-1975 at the Weatherspoon Art Museum, 2006.[12][13][14][15]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

1959

1960

1961

  • Ralph Humphrey: Recent Paintings, Mayer Gallery, New York, March 14 – April 1[18]

1965

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

  • Ralph Humphrey, André Emmerich Gallery, New York, March 20 – April 8[33][34]

1972

1973

  • Ralph Humphrey, Bykert Gallery, New York, May 12 – June 2[37][38]
  • Ralph Humphrey: Survey of Paintings, Texas Gallery, Houston, May 15 – June 9

1974

  • Ralph Humphrey, Bykert Gallery, New York, April 20 – May 15[39][40]
  • Ralph Humphrey: Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, San Francisco, November–December

1975

  • Ralph Humphrey: Paintings, 1974, Bykert Gallery, New York, February 4–26[41]
  • Ralph Humphrey: Paintings, 1958–1966, Bykert/ Downtown, New York, February 4–26[41]

1976

  • Ralph Humphrey, John Weber Gallery, New York, January 31 – February 25[42][43]

1976–1977

  • Ralph Humphrey: Recent Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, San Francisco, December 16, 1976 – January 22, 1977

1977

  • Ralph Humphrey, John Weber Gallery, New York, February 9–26[8]

1980

1982

  • Ralph Humphrey, Willard Gallery, New York, April 3–May 8[9][46][47]
  • Ralph Humphrey: Paintings, 1975–1982, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, October 6–30

1983

  • Ralph Humphrey: Selected Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, May 14 – June 11

1984

  • Delahunty Gallery, Dallas
  • Ralph Humphrey, Willard Gallery, New York, April 7 – May 12[48]

1985

  • Ralph Humphrey: Recent Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, October 16 – November 2

1987

  • Ralph Humphrey, Jay Gorney Modern Art, New York, January–February[49][50]

1990

  • Ralph Humphrey: 1990, Mary Boone Gallery, New York, March 3–31[51]
  • Ralph Humphrey: Frame Paintings, 1964 to 1965, Mary Boone Gallery, New York, September 8–October 6[10][52]
  • Ralph Humphrey: A Retrospective View, 1954–1990, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, November 8– December 5

1991

  • Ralph Humphrey: The Late Paintings on Paper, Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery, Hunter College, City University of New York, September 19 – October 26
  • Ralph Humphrey: Paintings, 1975–1985, John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco, October–November

1996

  • Ralph Humphrey: Selected Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, San Francisco, August 17 – October 17

1998

  • Ralph Humphrey, Danese Gallery, New York, January 16 – February 14

2000

  • Ralph Humphrey: Early Paintings, 1957–1967, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, November 1 – December 9

2001

  • Ralph Humphrey: Later Paintings, 1975–1982, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, April 5 – May 26

2008

  • Ralph Humphrey: Selected Works from the Estate, Nielsen Gallery, Boston, May 17 – June 14
  • Ralph Humphrey: Selected Paintings, 1957–1980, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, May 31 – June 28[53]

2012

  • Ralph Humphrey, Gary Snyder Gallery, New York, September 13 – October 27[11][54]

2015

  • Ralph Humphrey: Conveyance, Garth Greenan Gallery, New York, April 2–May 16[55]

Group Exhibitions[edit]

1961

1966

1967

1968

1968–1969

1969

1969–1970

1970–1971

  • Color and Field, 1890–1970, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, September 15 – November 1, 1970; Dayton Art Institute, Ohio, November 20, 1970 – January 10, 1971; Cleveland Museum of Art, February 4–March 28, 1971[65]

1971

1972

1973

  • Drawings, Bykert Gallery, New York, January 6–24
  • Gallery Toselli, Milan

1974

  • New Painting: Stressing Surface, Katonah Gallery, Katonah, New York, May 4 – June 23
  • Painting and Sculpture Today, Indianapolis Museum of Art, May 22 – July 14; Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, September 12–October 24
  • Ten Painters in New York, Michael Walls Gallery, New York, June 15 – July 6
  • Seventy-First American Exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago, June 15 – August 11

1975

  • 22 Artists, Susan Caldwell Gallery, New York, January 4–25
  • Fourteen Abstract Painters, Frederick S. Wight Art Gallery, University of California, Los Angeles, March 25 – May 25
  • Fourteen Artists, Baltimore Museum of Art, April 15 – June 1
  • A Group Show Selected by Klaus Kertess, Texas Gallery, Houston, September 15 – October 11
  • Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri

1975–1976

  • Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture of the ’60s and ’70s from the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, October 7–November 18, 1975; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, December 17, 1975 – February 15, 1976

1976

1977

  • Paintings on Paper, Drawing Center, New York, January 15–26[68]
  • Galerie Jean-Paul Najar, Paris
  • ’75, ’76, ’77: Painting, Part I, Sarah Lawrence College Art Gallery, Bronxville, New York, February 19–March 10; American Foundation for the Arts, Miami, April–May; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, June–July
  • A View of a Decade, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, September 10–November 10
  • John Weber Gallery, New York

1977–1978

1978–1979

  • Late Twentieth Century Art from the Sydney and Frances Lewis Foundation, Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, December 5, 1978 – January 9, 1979; Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, *March 22 – May 2, 1979

1979

  • 1979 Biennial Exhibition, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, February 6–April 1[13]
  • Generation, Susan Caldwell Gallery, New York
  • The Reductive Object: A Survey of the Minimalist Aesthetic in the 1960s, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, March 7 – April 29
  • The Implicit Image: Abstract Painting in the ’70s, Nielsen Gallery, Boston, April 29 – June 1
  • Color and Structure, Hamilton Gallery, New York, May 5 – June 2
  • Texas Gallery, Houston

1980

1981

1981–1982

  • Drawing Invitational 1981, Harm Bouckaert Gallery, New York, December 2, 1981 – January 2, 1982[71]

1982

1983

  • Abstract Painting: 1960–1969, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Queens, January 16 – March 13
  • New Work, New York: Newcastle Salutes New York, Newcastle Polytechnic Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, October 8–November 4

1984

  • Parasol and Simca: Two Presses/Two Processes, Center Gallery, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, February 3–April 4, 1984; Sordoni Art Gallery, Wilkes College, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, April 15–May 13
  • The Meditative Surface, Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, April 1 – May 16

1985

  • Abstract Painting Redefined, Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, February 16 – March 30
  • Now and Then: A Selection of Recent and Earlier Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, June 1 – August 31
  • American Abstract Painting: 1960–1980, Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, June 19 – August 24

1986

  • The Purist Image, Marian Locks Gallery, Philadelphia, November

1986–1987

  • The Window in Twentieth-Century Art, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York, September 21, 1986 – January 18, 1987; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, April 24– June 29, 1987

1997

2004

2006–2007

2008

  • The Idea of Nature, 33 Bond Gallery, New York, June 12–July 31
  • Into the Void: Abstract Art, 1948–2008, Tucson Museum of Art, July 17–September 26

2008–2009

  • Steve DiBenedetto, Ralph Humphrey, Chris Martin, and Andrew Masullo/Paintings, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, December 6, 2008 – January 31, 2009[75]

2009

2010

  • Wall-to-Wall, Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, June 5 – August 14[78]

2011

  • Surface Truths: Abstract Painting in the Sixties, Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, California, March 25 – August 15[79]

2011–2012

2012

2014–2015

2015

Collections[edit]

Humphrey's work can be found in prominent collections in America and Australia, including the following:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Smith, Roberta (July 17, 1990). "Ralph Humphrey, An Abstract Painter And a Teacher, 58". New York Times. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  2. ^ Wilson, William S. (1977). "Ralph Humphrey: An Apology for Painting". Artforum. 16 (3): 54–59.
  3. ^ a b c d Baker, Kenneth (1984). "Material Feelings". Art in America. 72 (9): 162–167.
  4. ^ Baker, Amy (1982). "Painterly Edge". Artforum. 20 (8): 38–43.
  5. ^ a b Judd, Donald (1960). "In the Galleries: Ralph Humphrey". Arts Magazine. 34 (6): 54.
  6. ^ a b c Levine, Neil A. (1965). "Reviews and Previews: Ralph Humphrey". Art News. 64 (4): 16.
  7. ^ a b Pincus-Whitten, Robert (1969). "New York: Ralph Humphrey". Artforum. 7 (8): 69.
  8. ^ a b Schwartz, Ellen (1977). "New York Reviews: Ralph Humphrey". Art News. 76 (4): 126.
  9. ^ a b Phillips, Deborah C. (1982). "New York Reviews: Ralph Humphrey". Art News. 81 (7): 161.
  10. ^ a b Mary Boone Gallery (1990). Ralph Humphrey, Frame Paintings, 1964 to 1965. New York: Mary Boone Gallery. ISBN 9780941863155.
  11. ^ a b Greenan, Garth (2012). Ralph Humphrey. New York: Gary Snyder Gallery. ISBN 9780982974766.
  12. ^ a b Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1966). Systemic Painting. New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
  13. ^ a b Tucker, Marcia (1971). The Structure of Color. New York: Whitney Museum of American Art.
  14. ^ Whitney Museum of American Art (1979). 1979 Biennial Exhibition. New York: Whitney Museum of American Art. ISBN 9780874270129.
  15. ^ a b Siegel, Katy (2006). High Times, Hard Times: NEw York Painting, 1967-1975. New York: Independent Curators International. ISBN 9781933045399.
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  17. ^ Campbell, Lawrence (1960). "Reviews and Previews: Ralph Humphrey". Art News. 58 (10): 14–15.
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External links[edit]