Ralph Sam Haeems

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Ralph Sam Haeems (9 November 1940 – 31 March 2005) was a leading British criminal defence solicitor. He is credited with innovative defences in criminal cases, which, in some cases, created new legal precedents in UK appeals courts.[1]

Early years[edit]

Haeems was born in Bombay (now Mumbai) to a Bene Israel Jewish family. His parents were teachers. He attended Bombay University, earning his B.Sc degree in engineering. He came to England in 1962 to study for a master's degree in chemistry.

London[edit]

He found a position as an office clerk in the East End, placing bets for his employers and collecting the winnings. He was promoted to supervising the defense of a murder suspect, whom he helped to acquit. Haeems then found employment with an offer of an articled clerkship. In 1972 he qualified as a solicitor and five years later set up his own practice.[1]

Notable cases[edit]

Haeems participated in the trials of George Ince, Dennis Nilsen, Russell Bishop and several defendants in the Brinks Matt bullion robbery.

Death[edit]

Haeems suffered a heart attack in January 2005 and underwent triple bypass surgery two months later. He died, aged 64, from complications which set in during the following weeks.

Family[edit]

He was survived by his wife Angela, whom he married in 1967, a son (a barrister) and two daughters (both solicitors).[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Obituary in The Guardian

External links[edit]