Ralph of Irton

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Ralph of Irton
Bishop of Carlisle
See Diocese of Carlisle
Elected 14 December 1278
Term ended 1 March 1292
Predecessor William de Rotherfeld
Successor John de Halton
Other posts Prior of Gisborough
Orders
Consecration before 9 April 1280
Personal details
Died 1 March 1292
London
Buried Carlisle Cathedral

Ralph of Irton (or Ralph de Ireton or Ralph Ireton; died 1292) was a medieval Bishop of Carlisle.

Life[edit]

Ralph was a canon of Gisborough Priory, an Augustinian foundation, sometime before 1257. Between 1257 and 1261 he was elected prior of Gisborough.[1] He was elected to the see of Carlisle on 14 December 1278. However, King Edward I of England objected to the election because no new license had been obtained from the king after William de Rotherfeld refused the see. Ralph appealed to Pope Nicholas III and the election was quashed, however Nicholas then provided Ralph to the see and he was consecrated before 9 April 1280.[2]

Ralph imposed taxation in his diocese to secure the completion of Carlisle Cathedral. He also served Edward as a diplomat in the negotiations over the proposed marriage of the future Edward II to Margaret, the Maid of Norway, which never came to pass after Margaret's death soon after the marriage was arranged.[1] Ralph died on 1 March 1292[3] while attending a parliament at London, from a burst vein. His will provided that most of his belongings be left to his successors at Carlisle. He was buried in Carlisle Cathedral, but his tomb was destroyed soon after his burial by a fire in the cathedral.[1]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Summerson "Irton, Ralph of" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  2. ^ Greenway Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300: Volume 2: Monastic Cathedrals (Northern and Southern Provinces): Carlisle: Bishops
  3. ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 235

References[edit]

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
William de Rotherfeld
Bishop of Carlisle
1278–1292
Succeeded by
John de Halton