Raml Zayta

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Raml Zayta
RamlZeitaLocations.jpg
Raml Zayta is located in Mandatory Palestine
Raml Zayta
Raml Zayta
Arabic رمل زيتة
Also spelled Raml Zeita (Khirbat Qazaza)
Subdistrict Tulkarm
Coordinates 32°26′6″N 34°56′12″E / 32.43500°N 34.93667°E / 32.43500; 34.93667Coordinates: 32°26′6″N 34°56′12″E / 32.43500°N 34.93667°E / 32.43500; 34.93667
Palestine grid 145/203
Population 140[1] (1945)
Date of depopulation 15 March 1948
Current localities Sde Yitzhak,[2] Chadera[2]

Raml Zayta (Arabic: رمل زيتة‎‎, Raml Zeitâ), also Khirbet Qazaza, was a Palestinian Arab village located 15 km northwest of Tulkarm.[3]

History[edit]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1931 census of Palestine it was counted with Zeita, Tulkarm, and together they had a population 1165, all Muslim, in a total of 237 houses.[4]

In 1945, the village had a population of 140 Muslims, with a total of 14,837 dunams of land.[1][5] The land ownership of the village before occupation in dunams:[5]

Owner Dunams
Arab 12,720
Jewish 1,453
Public 664
Total 14,837

Types of land use in dunams in the village in 1945:[6][7]

Land Usage Arab Jewish Public
Citrus and bananas 126 4 -
Irrigated and plantation 27 4 -
Cereal 12,554 1,441 111
Urban - - -
Cultivable 12,707 1,449 111
Non-cultivable 13 4 553

1948, and aftermath[edit]

According to Rosemarie Esber, the village was depopulated on 15 March 1948 during the 1948 Palestine war.[8] Benny Morris lists it as one of the villages for which the causes and date of depopulation are unknown.[9]

Esber, in an interview with a refugee from Raml Zaita, Zakiya Abu Hammad, writes that according to his memories, Yishuv forces had besieged the village for about two weeks, causing a lack of food: "[The Jews] started going into people's homes and forcing them out. They told us, "You either leave or we'll kill you." Some people were killed on the roads, as they abandoned their homes... They followed us. Those who were lucky, escaped with their lives, others did not." The villages were then forced out of their town and the surrounding villagers.[8]

According to Walid Khalidi writing in 1992, an Arab family is still living in the village in one of the original houses.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 21
  2. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 561
  3. ^ Khalidi, 1992, p. 560
  4. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 58
  5. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 76
  6. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 127
  7. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 177
  8. ^ a b Esber, 2008, p. 297
  9. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xvi, village #183

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]