Rampage: The Hillside Strangler Murders

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Rampage: The Hillside Strangler Murders
RampageTheHillsideStranglerMurders.jpg
DVD cover
Directed by Chris Fisher
Produced by Chris Fisher
Ash R. Shah
Written by Chris Fisher
Aaron Pope
Starring Brittany Daniel
Lake Bell
Michelle Borth
Tomas Arana
Clifton Collins, Jr.
Music by Ryan Beveridge
Cinematography Eliot Rockett
Edited by Annette Davey
Daniel R. Padgett
Production
company
Release date
January 10th, 2006
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1,000,000 (estimated)

Rampage: The Hillside Strangler Murders is a 2006 direct-to-video crime thriller about the Hillside Strangler murders.[1][2] The film featured Brittany Daniel, Lake Bell and Michelle Borth with Tomas Arana and Clifton Collins, Jr. playing the killers Angelo Buono, Jr. and Kenneth Bianchi respectively. It was directed by Chris Fisher.

Plot[edit]

Kenneth Bianchi (Clifton Collins Jr.), one (along with his cousin Angelo Buono) of the two serial rapists and killers who terrorized the Los Angeles area in the late 1970s, is giving police station interviews to psychiatrist Samantha Stone (Brittany Daniel) who has disquieting lifestyle issues of her own. It falls to her to delve into the details of the case to determine the veracity of Bianchi's claims of multiple personality disorder, but in so doing, she is forced to relive the horrific crimes, one of which occurs at her very doorstep.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Started production in 2004 but was held back. The role of Jack was specifically written for Bret Roberts. Vincent Pastore was offered the part of Angelo Buono. When he had to decline, Tomas Arana got the part. Claire Forlani was also considered for the part of Samantha Stone.

Directed primarily with a hand-held camera by Chris Fisher. Filming took place in Valencia, California and was Shot in only 15 days.[3]

Reception[edit]

The film received negative reviews. On imdb.com, it holds an average score of 4.2/10, with the critical consensus being that the script and acting were melodramatic and that it wasn't scary enough to be a thriller.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]