Randolph, New Jersey

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For the former Randolph Township in Burlington County, see Randolph Township, Burlington County, New Jersey.
Randolph, New Jersey
Township
Township of Randolph
Official seal of Randolph, New Jersey
Seal
Motto: Where Life is Worth Living
Randolph Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Randolph Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Randolph, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Randolph, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°50′30″N 74°34′42″W / 40.841691°N 74.57833°W / 40.841691; -74.57833Coordinates: 40°50′30″N 74°34′42″W / 40.841691°N 74.57833°W / 40.841691; -74.57833[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated January 1, 1806[3]
Government[8]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Body Township Council
 • Mayor Joanne Veech (term ends December 31, 2016)[4][5]
 • Manager Stephen Mountain[6]
 • Clerk Donna Luciani[7]
Area[1]
 • Total 21.071 sq mi (54.574 km2)
 • Land 20.822 sq mi (53.929 km2)
 • Water 0.249 sq mi (0.645 km2)  1.18%
Area rank 134th of 566 in state
8th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[9] 994 ft (303 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 25,734
 • Estimate (2014)[13] 25,964
 • Rank 97th of 566 in state
3rd of 39 in county[14]
 • Density 1,235.9/sq mi (477.2/km2)
 • Density rank 357th of 566 in state
24th of 39 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07869[15]
07845- Ironia
07970- Mount Freedom
Area code(s) 973[16]
FIPS code 3402761890[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882201[1][19]
Website www.randolphnj.org

Randolph is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 25,734,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 887 (+3.6%) from the 24,847 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,873 (+24.4%) from the 19,974 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

History[edit]

The earliest known inhabitants of what is now Randolph were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans. The earliest European settlers of what is now Randolph were Quakers and one of the pioneering landowners was Hartshorne Fitz-Randolph, who purchased 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of what would become the township in the Mine Hill area in 1753, later becoming the namesake of the Township.[21] New Jersey’s first iron mine was established in Randolph in 1713, and for hundreds of years the mines fostered the development of the township, providing the raw materials for weapons used by the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.[21] During the war, the area was a supply point for George Washington's army during their winter encampment in nearby Jockey Hollow.[21]

Randolph was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 1, 1806, from portions of Mendham Township. Portions of the township were taken on April 1, 1869, to create Dover Town within the township, which became an independent municipality in 1896. Other portions of the township were taken to create Port Oram (June 26, 1895, now Wharton), Mine Hill Township (March 2, 1923) and Victory Gardens (June 20, 1951).[3]

Randolph became a vacation haven in the early part of the 20th century, known for its woods, ponds, lakes and air. Through the 1950s, farms, large hotels and bungalow colonies dotted the community. Performers such as Phil Silvers, and Frank Sinatra appeared at the hotels.[22] Boxers Max Baer, Floyd Patterson, James J. Braddock and Rocky Marciano trained or fought at the Saltz Hotel.[22]

Landmarks[edit]

Randolph's township historical landmarks include the Liberty Tree (which dates back to 1720), the 1869 Bryant Distillery (famed for its applejack) and the 1924 Millbrook School, now rehabilitated and in use as offices.[23]

The Randolph Historical Society has preserved the township's historical heritage in the Museum of Old Randolph.[24] One of Randolph's oldest streets, Gristmill Road, is on the National Register of Historic Places.[21]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 21.071 square miles (54.574 km2), including 20.822 square miles (53.929 km2) of land and 0.249 square miles (0.645 km2) of water (1.18%).[1][2]

Land in Randolph ranges from 551 feet (168 m) to 1,120 feet (340 m) above sea level. Randolph Township has been designated half rural, half suburban by the New Jersey State Planning Commission.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Black River Pond, Calis, Center Grove,[citation needed] Fernbrook,[citation needed] Ironia, Mill Brook, Mount Fern, Mount Freedom, Shongum and Youngstown.[25]

Situated upstream of the Black River, the South Branch of the Raritan River, the Whippany River and the Rockaway River, the hills of Randolph attracted settlers and its streams provided power for industry.[21]

The township borders Mine Hill, Dover, Rockaway Township and Victory Gardens to the north, Mendham Township to the south, Denville Township and Morris Township to the east, Chester Township to the southwest and Roxbury to the west all of which are located in Morris County.

Geology[edit]

The township is located within the New Jersey Highlands, one of New Jersey's four major physiographic provinces. Part of the Appalachian Mountains, the Highlands are characterized by alternating flat-topped ridges and deep-striking valleys.

Climate[edit]

On average, the warmest month is July. The highest recorded temperature was 102 °F in 1953. On average, the coolest month is January, while the maximum average precipitation occurs in September. The lowest recorded temperature was -24 °F in 1943.[26]

Climate data for Randolph, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 36
(2)
40
(4)
49
(9)
60
(16)
70
(21)
77
(25)
82
(28)
80
(27)
72
(22)
62
(17)
52
(11)
41
(5)
60.1
(15.6)
Average low °F (°C) 17
(−8)
18
(−8)
26
(−3)
35
(2)
45
(7)
54
(12)
59
(15)
58
(14)
50
(10)
38
(3)
31
(−1)
22
(−6)
37.8
(3.1)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.30
(109.2)
3.23
(82)
4.18
(106.2)
4.54
(115.3)
4.93
(125.2)
4.78
(121.4)
5.03
(127.8)
4.78
(121.4)
5.09
(129.3)
4.05
(102.9)
4.32
(109.7)
4.05
(102.9)
53.28
(1,353.3)
Source: [27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,271
1820 1,252 −1.5%
1830 1,443 15.3%
1840 1,801 24.8%
1850 2,632 46.1%
1860 3,173 20.6%
1870 5,111 61.1%
1880 7,700 50.7%
1890 7,972 3.5%
1900 2,246 * −71.8%
1910 2,307 2.7%
1920 2,509 8.8%
1930 2,165 * −13.7%
1940 2,160 −0.2%
1950 4,293 98.8%
1960 7,295 * 69.9%
1970 13,296 82.3%
1980 17,828 34.1%
1990 19,974 12.0%
2000 24,847 24.4%
2010 25,734 3.6%
Est. 2014 25,964 [13][28] 0.9%
Population sources: 1800-1920[29]
1840[30] 1850-1870[31]
1850[32] 1870[33] 1880-1890[34]
1890-1910[35] 1910-1930[36]
1930-1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[10][11][12]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[3]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 25,734 people, 9,013 households, and 7,075 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,235.9 per square mile (477.2/km2). There were 9,343 housing units at an average density of 448.7 per square mile (173.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 82.44% (21,215) White, 2.68% (690) Black or African American, 0.11% (28) Native American, 10.46% (2,691) Asian, 0.01% (3) Pacific Islander, 2.27% (584) from other races, and 2.03% (523) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.17% (2,616) of the population.[10]

There were 9,013 households, of which 42.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.6% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.5% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.26.[10]

In the township, 28.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 31.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $123,041 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,800) and the median family income was $144,069 (+/- $7,473). Males had a median income of $100,895 (+/- $2,256) versus $65,011 (+/- $5,834) for females. The per capita income for the township was $56,879 (+/- $3,318). About 1.8% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 2.7% of those age 65 or over.[40]

2000 Census[edit]

Sign on Patriots Path

As of the 2000 United States Census,[17] there were 24,847 people, 8,679 households, and 6,804 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,185.2 people per square mile (457.7/km²). There were 8,903 housing units at an average density of 424.7 per square mile (164.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.70% White, 2.30% African American, 0.06% Native American, 9.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.31% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.86% of the population.[38][39]

There were 8,679 households out of which 44.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.2% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 18.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.28.[38][39]

In the township the population was spread out with 29.7% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.8 males.[38][39]

The median income for a household in the township was $97,589, and the median income for a family was $115,722. Males had a median income of $80,120 versus $45,455 for females. The per capita income for the township was $43,072. About 1.0% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.[38][39]

Parks and recreation[edit]

The Brundage Park Recreation Complex is 232 acres (94 ha). Facilities include six lighted tennis courts, four lighted softball fields, two lighted basketball courts, a tennis practice wall, a Skate Park, a 4 miles (6.4 km) paved walking and jogging trail, Brundage Park Playhouse, a playground, a picnic pavilion, a lacrosse/soccer field, a pond (for fishing or ice skating), a softball field, and a multipurpose area for soccer and other field sports.[41]

Freedom Park is 172 acres (70 ha). Facilities include (all lighted): a football field, a lacrosse field, a Little League field, a Babe Ruth baseball field, a multipurpose area, a softball field, a picnic pavilion, a sand volleyball court, and a playground area.[41]

Randolph Park is 41 acres (17 ha). It has a beach. Other facilities include a beach house with a changing room, a refreshment stand, a picnic facilities, a playground area, a permanent docks for lap swimming, a volleyball court and a basketball court.[41]

Heistein Park covers 44 acres (18 ha). Facilities include 6 soccer fields, 4 Little League/softball fields, a picnic pavilion, restrooms, a refreshment stand, and a lake for fishing and ice skating. Soccer tournaments are held here for travel team soccer.[41]

Stonybrook Park is 30 acres (12 ha). This park is used as a day camp during the summer months (June - August) and is divided by a local street to create east and west sections. Facilities include a field in the western portion, while the eastern portion hosts the day camp with a swimming pool, a small tot-lot, and various buildings for camp activities.[41]

Kiwanis Park contains 1.8 acres (0.73 ha). Facilities include a playground, an open play area and picnic tables.[41]

Rosenfarb Park facilities include a half-court basketball court and a picnic area.[41]

Hidden Valley Park contains 51 acres (21 ha) of rolling hills, a pond and natural walking trails. The township’s walking and biking trail cross the site.[41]

Cohen Farm Park consists of an undeveloped 111 acres (45 ha). The township’s 16-mile trail system cuts through the park, connecting to Brundage Park and Freedom Park.[41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township Council is the legislative body of Randolph, operating under the Council-Manager form of government within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law. The seven-member Township Council is elected at-large in partisan elections to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either three or four seats up for election every other year as part of the November general election. The council selects one of its members to serve as mayor and another as deputy mayor, at a reorganization meeting conducted each year.[8]

The council represents the public and develops and adopts policies, resolves public issues, formulates township policy through motions, resolutions and ordinances which reflect the needs of the public, and maintains a working knowledge of intergovernmental issues and how they will affect the Township of Randolph. Thirteen separate advisory boards and committees assist policy formulation of the council. The Township Council is similar to a corporate board of directors and is assisted by the Township Attorney, who prepares ordinances and advises on legal issues, the Township Clerk, who prepares resolutions, and the Township Manager, who functions much like the CEO of a corporation.

As of 2015, members of the Randolph Township Council are Mayor Joanne Veech (R, term on township council and as mayor ends December 31, 2016), Deputy Mayor Roman Hirniak (R, term on council and as deputy mayor ends 2016), Christine Carey (R, 2016), Mark Forstenhausler (R, 2018), Michael Guadagno (R, 2018), James B. Loveys (R, 2018) and Allen Napoliello (R, 2018).[4][42][43][44][45][46][47][48]

Mark Forstenhausler was selected in February 2014 to fill the vacant seat expiring in December 2014 of Tom MacArthur, who resigned from office after announcing that he was moving out of the township.[49]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Randolph Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[50] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[11][51][52]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[53] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[54] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[55][56]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[57][58] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[59] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[60]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[61] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[62] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[63] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[64] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[65] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[66] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[67] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[68] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[69][62][70] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[71] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[72] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[62][73]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 16,398 registered voters in Randolph Township, of which 3,822 (23.3%) were registered as Democrats, 4,895 (29.9%) were registered as Republicans and 7,670 (46.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 11 voters registered to other parties.[74]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 53.4% of the vote (6,636 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.6% (5,662 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (119 votes), among the 12,479 ballots cast by the township's 17,405 registered voters (62 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 71.7%.[75][76] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 50.7% of the vote (6,745 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 48.0% (6,388 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (116 votes), among the 13,310 ballots cast by the township's 17,158 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.6%.[77] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 56.1% of the vote (7,166 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 43.0% (5,488 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (90 votes), among the 12,764 ballots cast by the township's 16,944 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.3.[78]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.9% of the vote (4,838 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 29.4% (2,065 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (121 votes), among the 7,103 ballots cast by the township's 17,213 registered voters (79 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 41.3%.[79][80] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.4% of the vote (4,936 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.5% (2,742 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.3% (697 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (36 votes), among the 8,445 ballots cast by the township's 16,615 registered voters, yielding a 50.8% turnout.[81]

Education[edit]

The Randolph Township Schools educate children in public school for Kindergarten through twelfth grade, as well as special-needs preschoolers. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's six schools had an enrollment of 5,186 students and 417.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.44:1.[82] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[83]) are the four elementary schools — Center Grove Elementary School[84] (520 students; grades PreK-5), Fernbrook Elementary School[85] (595; K-5), Ironia Elementary School[86] (527; K-5) and Shongum Elementary School[87] (646; K-5) — along with Randolph Middle School[88] for grades 6-8 (1,257 students) and Randolph High School[89] for grades 9-12 (1,641 students).[90][91]

Established in 1968, the main campus of the County College of Morris is located on a 218-acre (88 ha) campus in Randolph Township.[92] Rutgers University has a partnership with County College of Morris that allows students who have earned an Associate degree to complete a Bachelor's degree through the off-campus Rutgers courses taken at the County College of Morris campus in Randolph.[93]

The Hebrew Academy of Morris County is a coeducational Jewish day school for students in preschool through eighth grade, serving approximately 225 children. The school has been recognized as a recipient of the National Blue Ribbon School Award by the United States Department of Education.[94]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 144.95 miles (233.27 km) of roadways, of which 119.53 miles (192.36 km) were maintained by the municipality, 19.62 miles (31.58 km) by Morris County and 5.80 miles (9.33 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[95]

Route 10, Dover-Chester Road (County Route 513), and Sussex Turnpike (County Route 617) pass through township lines.[96]

Public transportation[edit]

The New Jersey Transit 875 route serves the borough.[97][98]

New Jersey Transit offered local bus service on the MCM2 and MCM7 routes[99] which were eliminated due to budget constraints.[100]

Community[edit]

Randolph has organized events, including high school sports, senior citizen gatherings, and various group activities. The public library schedules reading groups and other programs. Games and socials are held at the Senior Citizen Center at the Brundage Park Playhouse, which presents plays and musicals with youth and adult performers.[101]

Recreation programs are available for children, teenagers and adults.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Randolph include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 196. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  4. ^ a b 2014 Township Council Roster, Township of Randolph. Accessed June 30, 2015.
  5. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed January 21, 2015. As of date accessed, James Loveys is listed as mayor with a term-end date of December 31, 2014.
  6. ^ Township Manager, Township of Randolph. Accessed July 4, 2014.
  7. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Randolph. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Randolph, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Randolph township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Randolph township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Randolph, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Randolph, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 10, 2014.
  17. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c d e Get to Know Us: History, Township of Randolph. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Our Grand Hotels, Township of Randolph. Accessed October 23, 2014.
  23. ^ Randolph Landmarks, Township of Randolph. Accessed April 20, 2012.
  24. ^ Historical Society, Township of Randolph. Accessed April 19, 2012
  25. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 11, 2015.
  26. ^ Record Temperatures for Randolph, NJ (07869), The Weather Channel. Accessed January 29, 2011.
  27. ^ Monthly Averages for Randolph, NJ (07869), The Weather Channel. Accessed December 15, 2010.
  28. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  29. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  30. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 18, 2013. Population of 1,792 listed for 1840 is nine less than population listed in table.
  31. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 268, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed December 22, 2012. "Randolph contained in 1850 2,632 inhabitants; in 1860, 3,173; and in 1870, 5,111."
  32. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  33. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  34. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  35. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  36. ^ "Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I", United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  37. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  38. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Randolph township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Randolph township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2012.
  40. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Randolph township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i About Our Parks, Township of Randolph. Accessed April 19, 2012.
  42. ^ 2015 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Township of Randolph. Accessed June 30, 2015.
  43. ^ Morris County Manual 2015, p. 55. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2015.
  44. ^ Morris County Municipal Elected Officials For The Year 2015, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated February 27, 2015. Accessed August 5, 2015.
  45. ^ General Election 2014 November 4, 2014 Summary Report Morris County Official Results, Clerk of Morris County, New Jersey, updated November 14, 2014. Accessed June 30, 2015.
  46. ^ General Election 2012 November 6, 2012 Morris County UNOFFICIAL RESULTS for Randolph Township, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 6, 2012, backed up by the Internet Archive as of November 13, 2012. Accessed August 5, 2015.
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