Randy Boissonnault

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Randy Boissonnault
Randy Boissonnault.jpg
Boissonnault in 2014
Special Advisor to the Prime Minister on LGBTQ2 Issues
In office
November 15, 2016 – September 11, 2019
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Edmonton Centre
In office
October 19, 2015 – September 11, 2019
Preceded byLaurie Hawn
Succeeded byJames Cumming
Personal details
Born (1970-07-14) July 14, 1970 (age 50)
Morinville, Alberta
Political partyLiberal
ProfessionManagement Consultant
Websiterboissonnault.liberal.ca

Randy Boissonnault (born July 14, 1970) is a former Canadian politician, who was elected to represent the riding of Edmonton Centre as a Liberal member of the House of Commons of Canada in the 2015 federal election and served until his defeat in the 2019 Canadian federal election.[1]

He was one of five openly LGBT MPs serving in the 42nd Canadian Parliament, alongside Rob Oliphant, Seamus O'Regan, Randall Garrison and Sheri Benson.[2] He was the first openly gay MP elected in Alberta.[3]

Early life[edit]

Boissonnault was born in the Franco-Albertan town of Morinville, Alberta[4] on July 14, 1970.

After graduating from the University of Alberta, Boissonault studied at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar.[4] He subsequently worked as a lecturer at the University of Alberta's Campus Saint-Jean and as a journalist and political commentator for Radio-Canada and Les Affaires.[5]

Political career[edit]

Boissonnault was elected in the 2015 election in the riding of Edmonton Centre, the first Liberal MP to win in the riding for almost a decade.[4]

Upon being sworn in as a Member of Parliament, Boissonnault was named Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage.[4]

On November 15, 2016, Boissonnault was named special advisor on LGBTQ2 issues to the Prime Minister.[6] The role involves advising Trudeau "on the development and co-ordination of the Government of Canada’s LGBTQ2 agenda" including protecting LGBT rights in Canada and addressing both present and historical discrimination.[6]

He was defeated in the 2019 election.

Election results[edit]

2019 Canadian federal election: Edmonton Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative James Cumming 22,006 41.4% +6.45 none listed
Liberal Randy Boissonnault 17,524 33.0% -4.19 none listed
New Democratic Katherine Swampy 10,959 20.6% -3.85 $53,174.12
Green Grad Murray 1,394 2.6% -0.02 none listed
People's Paul Hookham 805 1.5% - $5,550.42
Rhinoceros Donovan Eckstrom 206 0.4% -0.08 $0.00
Independent Adil Pirbhai 119 0.2% -0.10 $3,475.90
Marxist–Leninist Peggy Morton 79 0.1% - $0.00
Total valid votes/Expense limit 53,092 100.0
Total rejected ballots 362
Turnout 53,454 65.4
Eligible voters 81,766
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.32
Source: Elections Canada[7][8][9]
2015 Canadian federal election: Edmonton Centre
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Randy Boissonnault 19,902 37.19 +13.46
Conservative James Cumming 18,703 34.95 -11.25
New Democratic Gil McGowan 13,084 24.45 -1.37
Green David Parker 1,403 2.62 -0.94
Rhinoceros Steven Stauffer 257 0.48
Independent Kat Yaki 163 0.30
Total valid votes/Expense limit 53,512 100.00   $210,254.07
Total rejected ballots 234 0.44
Turnout 53,746 68.79
Eligible voters 78,131
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +12.35
Source: Elections Canada[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Riding profile: Edmonton Centre". Edmonton Journal. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  2. ^ "Hedy Fry wins decisively as Liberals sweep Canada for majority". Daily Xtra, October 20, 2015.
  3. ^ "Edmonton's newest Liberal, Randy Boissonnault, got taste for politics at U of A and wanted to bring generational change to national politics". Edmonton Journal", October 21, 2015
  4. ^ a b c d Estabrooks, Trisha (May 2016). "A Force of Nature: From Morinville to Oxford to Ottawa, Randy Boissonnault hasn't let anything stand in the way of getting what he wants". Avenue Edmonton. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  5. ^ http://randyboissonnault.liberal.ca/biography/ Randy Boissonault - Biography - Liberal.ca
  6. ^ a b "Feds name gay MP as ‘LGBTQ2 issues’ advisor". Daily Xtra, November 15, 2016.
  7. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  8. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  9. ^ "Candidate Campaign Returns". Elections Canada. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  10. ^ "October 19, 2015 Election Results — Edmonton Centre (Validated results)". Elections Canada. October 23, 2015. Retrieved November 4, 2015.
  11. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates

External links[edit]