Randy Soderman

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Randy Soderman
Personal information
Date of birth (1974-05-01) May 1, 1974 (age 44)
Place of birth United States
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Playing position Midfielder / Defender
Youth career
CISCO Soccer Club
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1992–1993 Glendale Gauchos
1994 Grand Canyon Antelopes
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1992–1993 Arizona Cotton (indoor)
1994 Arizona Cotton
1995 Arizona Sandsharks (indoor) 26 (5)
1995–1996 Chicago Storm (indoor) 16 (3)
1996 Sacramento Knights (indoor) 13 (0)
1998–1999 Arizona Sahuaros ? (9)
1998–2000 Arizona Thunder (indoor) 49 (31)
2000–2001 Tucson Fireballs 10 (1)
2004–2006 St. Louis Steamers (indoor) 66 (20)
2006–2008 Chicago Storm (indoor) 41 (14)
2007–2009 Arizona Sahuaros
2012–2013 Real Phoenix FC (indoor) 10 (6)
Teams managed
2012 Tucson Extreme
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Randy Soderman is a retired American soccer player and technology entrepreneur who has founded multiple tech companies including Soderman Marketing & Glass Shop Go (Auto Glass Software).

The younger brother of Rick Soderman, Randy played for CISCO Soccer Club in Phoenix growing up.[1] In 1992, he graduated from Cactus High School. That year, he joined the Arizona Cotton for the 1992–93 USISL indoor season. Soderman attended Glendale Community College where he was a 1993 NJCAA Second Team All American.[2] In the summer of 1994, Soderman played outdoors with the Arizona Cotton. That fall, he entered Grand Canyon University, playing one season on the men’s soccer team. In 1995, he turned professional with the Arizona Sandsharks of the Continental Indoor Soccer League. That fall, he signed with the Chicago Power of the National Professional Soccer League. In the summer of 1996, he continued to play indoor summer soccer with the Sacramento Knights of the CISL. In 1998 and 1999, Soderman played for the Arizona Sahuaros of the USL D-3 Pro League, then returned to indoor summer soccer in 1999 with the Arizona Thunder of the World Indoor Soccer League where he won the WISL Defender of the Year award. In 2000 and 2001, he was with the Tucson Fireballs in the USL D-3 Pro League. In 2004, Soderman returned indoors with the St. Louis Steamers of the Major Indoor Soccer League. He played two season with the Steamers where he was voted to the MISL All-Star team in both years. In 2006, the Steamers folded and the Milwaukee Wave selected Soderman as their first overall pick in the Dispersal Draft. That same year, Soderman was called up to the United States national futsal team. On October 17, 2006, the Milwaukee Wave went Soderman and Alen Osmanovic to the Chicago Power in exchange for Anthony Maher and Tijani Ayegbusi. The two seasons he spent with the Storm were the last two professional seasons Soderman played. In 2007, he returned to the Arizona Sahuaros, now playing in the National Premier Soccer League.[3] In 2009, the Sahuaros played in the United States Adult Soccer Association.[4] On August 13, 2012, the Tucson Extreme of the Professional Arena Soccer League signed Soderman as head coach.[5] In September, the team announced it would delay its first season and Soderman signed with Real Phoenix FC in the Professional Arena Soccer League.[6]

Randy Soderman retired from Soccer in 2008 and entered into the technology industry where he founded Soderman Marketing & Xtraman Fundraising.[7][8] Successful digital marketing campaigns by Soderman Marketing lead to Soderman launching Dealer Auto Glass of Arizona and Dealer Auto Glass of Denver in 2012.[9][10] In 2016, Soderman launched Elite Web Design of Phoenix as an extension of Soderman Marketing.[11] With extensive experience in the technology industry, later 2016 Soderman co-founded and launched an auto glass software company called Glass Shop Go.[12] Soderman and partners built Glass Shop Go in order to revolutionize the auto glass software industry. Late 2016 Soderman was first mentioned in Forbes and Inc Magazine.[13][14]

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