Ranfurly, New Zealand

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Ranfurly
Settlement
The main street of Ranfurly
The main street of Ranfurly
Coordinates: 45°08′S 170°06′E / 45.133°S 170.100°E / -45.133; 170.100Coordinates: 45°08′S 170°06′E / 45.133°S 170.100°E / -45.133; 170.100
CountryNew Zealand
RegionOtago
Territorial authorityCentral Otago District
WardManiototo Ward
Government
 • Local authorityCentral Otago District Council
 • Regional councilOtago Regional Council
Area
 • Urban area3.86 km2 (1.49 sq mi)
Population
 (2018 census)[2]
 • Urban area726
 • Density190/km2 (490/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+12 (NZST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+13 (NZDT)

Ranfurly is a town in the Central Otago District of Otago, New Zealand. Located 110 kilometres (68 miles) north of Dunedin, it lies in the dry rough plain of Maniototo at a moderately high altitude (around 430 metres or 1,410 feet above sea level) close to a small tributary of the Taieri River. It operates as a service town for the local farming community. The town was formerly known as Eweburn, one of the "farmyard" names bestowed by former Otago Chief Surveyor John Turnbull Thomson on many small streams and locations in the district. The modern name honours the Fifth Earl of Ranfurly, who served as Governor of New Zealand (1897–1904) at the time of the extension of the Otago Central Railway to the area. Ranfurly is well known for its Art Deco buildings, such as its hotel and the milk bar.

History[edit]

Ranfurly's Art Deco milk bar

During the Central Otago goldrush of the 1860s, several important deposits of the precious metal were found near Ranfurly, notably at Kyeburn and Naseby, close to the southwestern face of the Kakanui Range.

After the gold-rush faded Ranfurly grew at the expense of Naseby, spurred by the arrival of the railway in 1898. The rail line was closed in 1989 and the track removed, but its course became a major walking and cycling route, the Otago Central Rail Trail, which attracts tourists. The former railway station now serves as a museum and display centre.

The town became an important service-centre for the rural community, experiencing a building boom in the 1930s. It has a large proportion of rural Art Deco buildings which have been preserved from that time. An annual festival commemorating Ranfurly's Art Deco heritage used to take place each February.

The nearby Ida Valley functioned as one of the locations for Peter Jackson's 2001–2003 Lord of the Rings film trilogy, representing the wide plains of Rohan.

Climate[edit]

Under the Köppen climate classification Ranfurly has an oceanic climate (Cfb), with continental influence.

Central Otago in general, and the Maniototo in particular, has one of New Zealand's very few zones influenced by continental climates, with large daily and seasonal temperature extremes. Average highs in summer are around 22 °C (72 °F), with occasional days as warm as 30 °C (86 °F); average winter highs are around 7 °C (45 °F), with the coldest nights below −5 °C (23 °F). The lowest temperature on record in New Zealand (−25.6 °C or −14.1 °F) was recorded at Ranfurly in 1903.[3] Heavy frosts are common throughout winter.

The town is sheltered from the prevailing rain patterns by the mountains to the west. The Nor'wester foehn wind is thus a frequent weather pattern, and annual rainfall is only in the region of 300–400 mm (12–16 in).

Climate data for Ranfurly, New Zealand
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 32.7
(90.9)
33.4
(92.1)
30.8
(87.4)
26.5
(79.7)
22.0
(71.6)
17.8
(64.0)
16.2
(61.2)
19.2
(66.6)
22.2
(72.0)
26.5
(79.7)
29.0
(84.2)
31.2
(88.2)
33.4
(92.1)
Average high °C (°F) 21.7
(71.1)
21.8
(71.2)
19.5
(67.1)
15.6
(60.1)
10.8
(51.4)
7.2
(45.0)
6.7
(44.1)
9.5
(49.1)
13.3
(55.9)
15.9
(60.6)
18.0
(64.4)
20.5
(68.9)
15.0
(59.0)
Daily mean °C (°F) 14.6
(58.3)
14.5
(58.1)
12.5
(54.5)
9.1
(48.4)
5.3
(41.5)
2.4
(36.3)
1.9
(35.4)
4.2
(39.6)
7.1
(44.8)
9.6
(49.3)
11.4
(52.5)
13.6
(56.5)
8.9
(48.0)
Average low °C (°F) 7.4
(45.3)
7.1
(44.8)
5.5
(41.9)
2.6
(36.7)
−0.2
(31.6)
−2.4
(27.7)
−2.9
(26.8)
−1.2
(29.8)
0.9
(33.6)
3.2
(37.8)
4.7
(40.5)
6.7
(44.1)
2.6
(36.7)
Record low °C (°F) −2.7
(27.1)
−3.1
(26.4)
−5.3
(22.5)
−7.3
(18.9)
−10.9
(12.4)
−12.5
(9.5)
−25.6
(−14.1)
−15.4
(4.3)
−11.4
(11.5)
−8.0
(17.6)
−5.8
(21.6)
−4.3
(24.3)
−25.6
(−14.1)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 58.6
(2.31)
56.6
(2.23)
64.6
(2.54)
50.0
(1.97)
63.3
(2.49)
57.3
(2.26)
59.3
(2.33)
51.3
(2.02)
56.6
(2.23)
66.0
(2.60)
55.3
(2.18)
70.0
(2.76)
708.9
(27.91)
Source: Weatherbase[4]

Demographics[edit]

Ranfurly is described by Statistics New Zealand as a rural settlement. It covers 3.86 km2 (1.49 sq mi).[1] It is part of the much larger Maniototo statistical area.[5]

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
2006714—    
2013666−0.99%
2018726+1.74%
Source: [2]

Ranfurly had a population of 726 at the 2018 New Zealand census, an increase of 60 people (9.0%) since the 2013 census, and an increase of 12 people (1.7%) since the 2006 census. There were 333 households. There were 348 males and 375 females, giving a sex ratio of 0.93 males per female, with 90 people (12.4%) aged under 15 years, 93 (12.8%) aged 15 to 29, 288 (39.7%) aged 30 to 64, and 246 (33.9%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 91.3% European/Pākehā, 12.8% Māori, 1.2% Pacific peoples, 3.3% Asian, and 0.4% other ethnicities (totals add to more than 100% since people could identify with multiple ethnicities).

Although some people objected to giving their religion, 43.4% had no religion, 48.8% were Christian, 0.4% were Hindu and 0.8% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 48 (7.5%) people had a bachelor or higher degree, and 192 (30.2%) people had no formal qualifications. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 252 (39.6%) people were employed full-time, 105 (16.5%) were part-time, and 9 (1.4%) were unemployed.[2]

Sport[edit]

Ranfurly lies close to the heart of New Zealand's curling-playing region, and the local club have represented New Zealand at the 1999, 2004, and 2005 World Championships (finishing tenth, seventh and eighth respectively), as well as providing members for the New Zealand 2006 Winter Olympics curling team.

Ranfurly has been the birthplace of several recent members of the New Zealand women's (field) hockey team.

Education[edit]

Maniototo Area School is a co-educational state area school for Year 1 to 13 students,[6][7] with a roll of 150 as of July 2022.[8] The school has predecessors from 1879.[9][10]

St John's School is a co-educational state-integrated Catholic primary school for Year 1 to 8 students,[11] with a roll of 58 as of July 2022.[12] It was established in 1945.[13]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

Media related to Ranfurly, New Zealand at Wikimedia Commons

  1. ^ a b "ArcGIS Web Application". statsnz.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved 7 December 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. 7027814–7027818.
  3. ^ "NZ's temperature record hits new low - minus 25.6degC". The New Zealand Herald. 12 July 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2011.
  4. ^ "Ranfurly, New Zealand - Travel and vacation weather averages, current conditions and forecasts". Weatherbase. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  5. ^ 2018 Census place summary: Maniototo
  6. ^ "Maniototo Area School Official School Website". maniototo.school.nz.
  7. ^ "Maniototo Area School Ministry of Education School Profile". educationcounts.govt.nz. Ministry of Education.
  8. ^ "Maniototo Area School Education Review Office Report". ero.govt.nz. Education Review Office.
  9. ^ "Newsletter - Opening Ceremony" (PDF). Maniototo Area School. 11 June 2021.
  10. ^ "Post-Primary (Secondary) Schools in Otago and Southland" (PDF). Friends of the Hocken Collection. February 2009.
  11. ^ "St John's SchoolMinistry of Education School Profile". educationcounts.govt.nz. Ministry of Education.
  12. ^ "St John's School Education Review Office Report". ero.govt.nz. Education Review Office.
  13. ^ "The History of The Sisters of Mercy in the Dunedin Diocese". Mercy Schools. Retrieved 7 December 2021.