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Raptor (Cedar Point)

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Raptor
Raptor entrance sign.jpg
Raptor (Zero-G & Majority).JPG
Raptor as viewed from the Sky Ride
Cedar Point
Coordinates 41°28′44.50″N 82°40′54.50″W / 41.4790278°N 82.6818056°W / 41.4790278; -82.6818056Coordinates: 41°28′44.50″N 82°40′54.50″W / 41.4790278°N 82.6818056°W / 41.4790278; -82.6818056
Status Operating
Soft opening date May 6, 1994
Opening date May 7, 1994
Cost $11,500,000 - $12,000,000
Replaced Mill Race
General statistics
Type Steel – Inverted
Manufacturer Bolliger & Mabillard
Designer Werner Stengel
Model Inverted Coaster - Raptor
Lift/launch system Chain lift hill
Height 137 ft (42 m)
Drop 119 ft (36 m)
Length 3,790 ft (1,160 m)
Speed 57 mph (92 km/h)
Inversions 6
Duration 2:16
Max vertical angle 45°
Capacity 1,800 riders per hour
Height restriction 54 in (137 cm)
Trains 3 trains with 8 cars. Riders are arranged 4 across in a single row for a total of 32 riders per train.
Fast Lane available
Raptor at RCDB
Pictures of Raptor at RCDB

Raptor is a steel inverted roller coaster designed by Bolliger & Mabillard at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio, United States. When built in 1994, it broke many records and held many firsts when it opened. Instead of having a short layout designed to fit into a compact area like Batman: The Ride, Raptor was designed with a larger, 3,790-foot (1,160 m) layout making it the tallest, fastest and longest inverted roller coaster in the world when it opened. It features a total of six inversions, including a cobra roll, a first for inverted roller coasters.[1] At its opening, it was the largest investment in Cedar Point history.[2] The ride is themed as a bird of prey.[3]

Raptor has a clone, The Monster, at Walygator Parc in France. It was previously known as Orochi at Expoland in Japan.

History[edit]

Raptor's cobra roll, a first for inverted coasters

On August 19, 1993, Cedar Fair Entertainment Company filed a trademark for the name Raptor.[4] Raptor was then announced on September 1, 1993 during a press conference. Regarding the design of the attraction, Cedar Point management, said: "Raptor will be the most exciting and ambitious project ever ... a project that will challenge the boundaries of imagination and change the Sandusky, Ohio amusement park/resort like nothing before it."[5]

Construction started after the 1993 season with the site clearing of the Mill Race log flume water ride. The Midway Carousel and Calypso were relocated in October to other areas of the park to make room for Raptor. Footers also began to be poured that month. The lift hill was topped off in December with track construction continuing through January 1994. The first trains were tested about two months later in March. Final preparations were made in March with the entrance plaza being built and 85,000 square feet (7,900 m2) of midway replaced.[2] Media day was held on May 6 before the ride opened to the public the next day for the first time.[6] The ride was originally painted with dark green supports, bright green track and unpainted rails. It was repainted for the 2002 season and the rails were painted dark green, matching the supports.[7]

Ride experience[edit]

Raptor is located on three acres at the front of the park near Blue Streak. The ride travels over the pathway to Blue Streak and Calypso and passes by the Turnpike Cars, Cadillac Cars and Cedar Downs Racing Derby.[2] The queue features a DJ booth that is used on the weekends. They take requests from people in the queue for family friendly songs. They can also be found daily in Millennium Force's queue.[8] Raptor is themed as a bird of prey, not a velociraptor.[3]

View of Raptor from the Sky Ride

Layout[edit]

The ride begins with a left-hand turn out of the station to the lift hill that ascends 137 feet (42 m). Riders are pulled up by a 9,000 pound chain lift. At the top, the train dips slightly into the pre-drop before turning 90 degrees to the left as it drops 119 feet (36 m) down the first hill. From the bottom the train immediately enters a 100 feet (30 m) vertical loop. The train then enters a zero-g roll followed by the cobra roll which inverts riders twice. The cobra roll was a first for inverted roller coasters. After the cobra roll, the train climbs through an upward spiral and enters the mid-course brake run. Next the train dives down to the right transitioning into a brief straight section of track. Riders then enter the first of two corkscrews which rotates the train 360 degrees to the left. The track straightens briefly again before turning to the right and entering a short dip before taking riders into the second corkscrew. The ride finishes with a 1.5 revolution flat helix where riders encounter strong positive G-forces before making one last left turn into the final brake run.[1][9][10] One cycle of the ride lasts about 2 minutes and 16 seconds.[7]

Track[edit]

The steel track is approximately 3,790 feet (1,160 m) in length and the height of the lift is approximately 137 feet (42 m). The first drop is 119 feet (36 m). When the coaster first opened, it was painted with dark green supports, bright green track and unpainted rails. 1,500 gallons of paint was used to originally paint it. Raptor was repainted for the 2002 season and the rails were painted dark green, matching the supports.[7] Most of the 117 sections of track were manufactured by Clermont Steel Fabricators in Batavia, Ohio.[2]

Trains[edit]

Raptor operates with three steel and fiberglass trains. Each train has eight cars that have four seats in a single row for a total of 32 riders in Ski lift like trains. Riders are secured by an over the shoulder restraints with a locking belt.[11] The trains were manufactured in Switzerland at Bolliger & Mabillard's headquarters.[2]

Operation[edit]

Raptor's lift hill and loop

Raptor is adversely affected by unfavourable weather conditions as both a high altitude and high velocity ride. "Rain, high winds, and/or lightning" may result in the closing of the ride depending on the severity. It closes in high winds and any type of precipitation.[12]

There is no minimum age requirement, but passengers must meet the miniumum height requirement of 54 inches (1.4 m) to ride.[13] Some persons over a certain weight/waist size are not be permitted to ride if the seat and lapbar harness cannot accommodate them.[12] Passengers on Raptor may not bring any loose articles onto the train and are required to wear shirts and footwear. Headphones must be removed before boarding.[12]

Passengers are advised that they must not ride Raptor if they have "a history of recent surgery, heart trouble/high blood pressure, neck trouble, back trouble, or any other condition that may be aggravated by riding, or who are pregnant".[14]

Incidents[edit]

On July 6, 2009, a guest complained of feeling faint after the ride. Raptor was immediately shut down as the guest was transported to a local hospital. The ride remained closed for the remainder of the day, reopening the next afternoon after a complete inspection was completed. The guest was later released from the hospital.[15]

Awards[edit]

Raptor is one of the first inverted roller coasters built in the world and is still considered a top steel roller coaster supported by the Golden Ticket Award rankings.

Golden Ticket Awards: Top steel Roller Coasters
Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Ranking 6[16] 6[17] 5[18] 8[19] 12[20] 10[21] 10[22] 11[23] 14[24] 19[25] 22 (tie)[26] 22[27] 24 (tie)[28] 18[29] 31[30] 30[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Raptor". AmericaCoasters.com. Retrieved 4 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Cedar Point Raptor Construction/Documentary". Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Raptor Promotional Video". YouTube. Retrieved September 30, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Raptor Trademark". Legal Force. Retrieved October 19, 2012. 
  5. ^ "PointBuzz Timeline". PointBuzz. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  6. ^ Carr, Donald (May 7, 1994). "Riders get carried away with Cedar Point's Raptor". Toledo Blade. Retrieved September 30, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c Marden, Duane. "Raptor  (Cedar Point)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Jamming DJ's at Cedar Point". Cedar Point. Retrieved October 2, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Raptor POV". Cedar Point. Retrieved October 2, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Raptor at Ultimate Roller Coaster". Ultimate Roller Coaster. Retrieved October 2, 2012. 
  11. ^ Tassel, Russel. "Raptor at Coaster-Net". Coaster-Net. Retrieved October 2, 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c "Ride Policies and Procedures". 2012. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Rider Height Requirements". Retrieved May 29, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Guests with Special Needs". Retrieved May 29, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Cedar Point incident closes Raptor briefly". The Point Online. July 6, 2009. Retrieved July 15, 2009. 
  16. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 1998. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 1999. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. August 2000. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. September 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 18–19B. September 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 11 (6.2): 36–37. September 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 12 (6.2): 36–37. September 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 13 (6.2): 32–33. September 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 14 (6.2): 34–35. September 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  29. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 15 (6.2): 38–39. September 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  30. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 16 (6.2): 36–37. September 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 2, 2015. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 
  31. ^ "2013 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 17 (6.2): 34–35. September 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
unknown
World's tallest inverted roller coaster
May 1994–May 1996
Succeeded by
Montu
Preceded by
unknown
World's fastest inverted roller coaster
May 1994–May 1996
Succeeded by
Montu
Preceded by
Batman: The Ride
World's longest inverted roller coaster
May 1994–May 1996
Succeeded by
Montu