Ras Abu Aboud

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Ras Abu Aboud

راس بو عبود
District
Ras Abu Aboud is located in Doha
Ras Abu Aboud
Ras Abu Aboud
Ras Abu Aboud is located in Qatar
Ras Abu Aboud
Ras Abu Aboud
Coordinates: 25°17′23″N 51°34′44″E / 25.2897°N 51.5789°E / 25.2897; 51.5789Coordinates: 25°17′23″N 51°34′44″E / 25.2897°N 51.5789°E / 25.2897; 51.5789
CountryQatar Qatar
MunicipalityAd-Dawhah
ZoneZone 28
District no.26
Area
 • Total3.2 km2 (1.2 sq mi)
Population
(2010)
 • Total0
 • Density0.0/km2 (0.0/sq mi)

Ras Abu Aboud (Arabic: راس بو عبود‎, translit. Ra’s Abū ‘Abbūd) is a district located in the municipality of Doha in Qatar. It is an industrial district containing power and desalination plants.[1] It accommodates one of the three major power stations which supply electricity to the whole country.[2] It is one of the proposed venues for the Qatar 2022 World Cup.[3]

History[edit]

In the 1820s, George Barnes Brucks carried out the first British survey of the Persian Gulf.[4] He recorded the following notes about Ras Abu Aboud, which he referred to as Ras Boo Aboot:

"Ras Boo Aboot, the SE. boundary of Al Bidder Harbour, is in lat. 25° 17' N., long. 51° 35' E. The reef that forms the southern side of the entrance to Al Bidder Harbour runs out two miles from this point, and continues along shore, running off about one mile, until it joins Fasht al Anief."[5]

The British Hydrographic Office conducted a survey of the Persian Gulf in 1890 and wrote the following description of Ras Abu Aboud:

"Ras Bu Abut is a low point in the bay, 2½ miles W.N.W. from the last [Ras Abul Mashut]. Off it there is little reef, but between it and Abul Mushlit a great reef projects for 2 miles to the northward, forming the south side of the entrance to the harbour ; it is chiefly rocky, and has only a few feet on it at low water. The entrance to the harbour, north of this reef, is only one-third of a mile broad, for half a mile of its length, with 3½ and 4½ fathoms in it. The northern reef projects to south-eastward 1½ miles, from a low sandy island with grass on it, called Jezirat as Sufla [Al Safliya Island]. This reef is chiefly of sand, and, outside the entrance, trends to north-east and northward, extending for some miles. Sufla Island is narrow, and about a mile long East and West; it bears N. by E. 3 miles from Ras Bu Abut. Within the entrance the harbour opens out into a basin about 3 miles in extent, with soundings from 3 to 5 fathoms, quite regular, over a bottom of white mud or clay."[6]

Industrial infrastructure[edit]

Power station[edit]

Inaugurated in 1963, the Ras Abu Aboud power station was built at a cost of QR 1 billion. It had a capacity of 60 MW in 1970, and an expansion in 1972 increased this to 90 MW. After several more expansions, by 1976 its capacity had been increased to 102.5 MW.[7]

By 1984 its capacity was more than doubled to 210 MW.[8]

Desalination plant[edit]

In 1983, over QR 50 million had been invested in the desalination plant and it had a production of 11.5 million gallons per day.[7]

Qatar Petroleum[edit]

Qatar Petroleum (QP) handles its Doha operations out of Ras Abu Aboud. The following facilities of QP are based in Ras Abu Aboud:

  • Training Center.[9]
  • Environmental Affairs Department on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Information Technology Department Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Technical Records Center, Oil and Gas Ventures Services Department on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Doha Distribution Center on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Environmental Affairs Department on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]

Landmarks[edit]

View of the Doha Corniche from the Marriott Hotel in Ras Abu Aboud.
  • Ras Abu Aboud Civil Defense.[9]
  • Qatar Table Tennis Association.[9]
  • Doha Sailing Club on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Sharq Village and Spa on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Marriott Hotel on Ras Abu Aboud Street.[9]
  • Housing Section, Human Resources Department of the Ministry of Municipality and Environment on Tabouk Street.[9]

Transport[edit]

Currently, the underground Ras Abu Aboud Metro Station is under construction, having been launched during Phase 1. Once completed, it will be part of Doha Metro's Gold Line.[10]

Demographics[edit]

Year Population
1986[11] 2,338
1997[12] 1969
2004[13] 770
2010[14] 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Report: Qatar 2012. Oxford Business Group. 2012. p. 83.
  2. ^ Qatar Labor Laws and Regulations Handbook - Strategic Information and Basic Laws. IBP. 2013. p. 165. ISBN 978-1438781501.
  3. ^ Saraiva, Alexia. "Get To Know The 8 2022 Qatar World Cup Stadiums". ArchDaily.
  4. ^ Mark Hobbs. "George Barnes Brucks and the First English Survey of the Gulf". Qatar Digital Library. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  5. ^ G.B. Brucks, Robert Hughes Thomas (1856). "Historical and other information connected with place in the Persian Gulf". Bombay Education Society's Press. p. 559.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. ^ The Persian Gulf pilot: comprising the Persian Gulf, Gulf of Omán; and Makran coast. Great Britain: Hydrographic Dept. 1890. p. 123. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. ^ a b Whelan, John (1983). Qatar, a MEED practical guide. London: Middle East Economic Digest. p. 113. ISBN 0950521191.
  8. ^ Economical and Social Infrastructures in the State of Qatar. Doha: Al Noor Pub. 1984. p. 48.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Qatar Landmarks". Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  10. ^ "QAR Metro". arcgis.com. Retrieved 17 March 2019.
  11. ^ "1986 population census" (PDF). Qatar Statistics Authority. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 July 2015. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  12. ^ "1997 population census" (PDF). Qatar Statistics Authority. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 May 2015. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  13. ^ "2004 population census". Qatar Statistics Authority. Retrieved 1 July 2015.
  14. ^ "2010 population census" (PDF). Qatar Statistics Authority. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015.