Rathore

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In the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, the Rathore (or Rathaur or Rathor or Rathur or Rathod or Rathour or Rahtore) is a Rajput clan.[1][full citation needed]

The Rathores claim descent from the mythical Suryavansha (Solar dynasty).[2]

Notable people[edit]

Rathore states[edit]

The various cadet branches of the Rathore clan gradually spread to encompass all of Marwar and later founded states in Central India and Gujarat. At the time of India's independence in 1947, the princely states ruled by various branches of the Rathore clan included:[5][6]

  • Jodhpur (Marwar): covering the present-day districts of Jodhpur, Pali, Nagaur, Barmer and Jalore.
  • Bikaner: Covering the present-day districts of Bikaner, Churu, Ganganagar and Hanumangarh;
  • Kishangarh in present-day Rajasthan, founded in 1611 by Raja Kishan Singh, son of Udai Singh of Marwar & balawat Rathore
  • Idar in present-day Gujarat, founded in 1728 or 1729.
  • Ratlam in present-day Madhya Pradesh, founded 1651.
  • Jhabua in present-day Madhya Pradesh, founded in 1584 by raja Keshav Das.
  • Sitamau in present-day Madhya Pradesh, founded 1701 by Raja Kesho Das.
  • Sailana in present-day Madhya Pradesh, founded in 1730 by Raja Jai Singh.
  • Alirajpur in present-day Madhya Pradesh, founded in 1437 by raja Anand Deo.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Contributions to Indian Sociology". Retrieved 2014-06-15.
  2. ^ Indian India. Director of Public Relations, Chamber of Princes. 1945-01-01.
  3. ^ Pal, Dharam (1978). Traditions of the Indian army (3rd ed.). National Book Trust, India. Cite: Naik Jadunath Singh, a Rathor Rajput, serving in 1/7 Rajput Regiment (now the 4th Battalion of the Brigade of Guards) won the Param Vir Chakra posthumously in the Jammu and Kashmir operations in 1948.
  4. ^ "Faculty Research | Department of Chemistry | Marquette University". www.marquette.edu. Retrieved 2018-11-02.
  5. ^ Indian Princely Medals: A Record of the Orders, Decorations, and Medals by Tony McClenaghan, pg 179
  6. ^ Dhananajaya Singh (1994). The House of Marwar. Lotus Collection, Roli Books. p. 13. He was the head of the Rathore clan of Rajputs, a clan which besides Jodhpur had ruled over Bikaner, Kishengarh, Idar, Jhabhua, Sitamau, Sailana, Alirajpur and Ratlam, all States important enough to merit gun salutes in the British system of protocol. These nine Rathore States collectively brought to India territory not less than 60,000 square miles in area.