Raúl Macías

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Raúl Macías
Statistics
Real name Raúl Macías Guevara
Nickname(s) Ratón Macías
Rated at Bantamweight
Height 1.61 m (5 ft 3 12 in)
Reach 1.61 m (63 in)
Nationality Mexican
Born July 28, 1934
Mexico City, Mexico
Died March 23, 2009(2009-03-23) (aged 74)
Mexico City, Mexico
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 43
Wins 41
Wins by KO 25
Losses 2
Draws 0

Raúl Macías Guevara (July 28, 1934 in Mexico City - March 23, 2009)[1] was a former Mexican boxer and boxing trainer. Born in the same Mexico City barrio as Rubén Olivares, Macías had always expressed pride at being Mexican. Widely known as "Ratón" Macías, or "Mouse" Macías, he won a bronze medal at the 1951 Pan American Games, Macias died at the age of 74.

Amateur career[edit]

Macias began his amateur career at age fourteen, winning the National Junior Flyweight, Flyweight and Bantamweight titles. He also won a bronze medal at the Pan American Games, and represented Mexico as a bantamweight at the 1952 Helsinki Olympic Games. His results were:

  • Defeated Angel Amaya (Venezuela) 3-0
  • Lost to Gennady Garbuzov (Soviet Union) 0-3

Professional career[edit]

On January 1, 1953, Macias debuted as a professional boxer with a first round knockout win against Memo Sanchez in Culiacán, Sinaloa, Mexico. Exactly one month later and in only his second fight, Macias had his first ten round bout, and he outpointed Chucho Tello in Culiacán, a feat he would duplicate in their rematch, which was Macias' third fight.

Macias piled up a record of 8-0 with 2 knockouts and then faced Beto Couray on October 17, 1953 in Mexico City, for the Mexican Bantamweight title, lifting the national championship from Couray with a 12 round decision win. After 6 more wins, he challenged Nate Brooks on September 26, 1954 for the continental, NABF Bantamweight championship, which he took with a twelve round decision in Mexico City.

Macías was one of Televisa's first boxing stars. As television was in its infancy around the world, he was one of Mexico's popular fighters of the time, and many of his fights were shown live on Televisa during the 1950s.

National Boxing Association World Bantamweight champion Robert Cohen refused to defend his title against Macías, so the NBA decided to declare the title vacant and have Macias and Chamroen Songkitrat fight for the championship. It was both Macías' first world title try and fight abroad. On March 9, 1955 in San Francisco, California, Macías became NBA world Bantamweight champion by knocking Songkiktrat out in round eleven. The referee of that fight was Fred Apostoli, a former world champion boxer himself.

Next followed a series of non-title fights. On June 16 of that same year, Macías suffered his first defeat when he was knocked out in the third round by Billy Peacock in Los Angeles. This would be Macías' only knockout defeat.

Macías' popularity followed him to California, where he fought a number of times, and to Texas, specially in the city of El Paso.

Macias had five victories after losing to Peacock and before defending his NBA world Bantamweight title for the first time. He defeated Leo Espinoza, father of Philippines world boxing champion Luisito Espinoza, by a tenth round knockout on March 25, 1956 in Mexico City. After nine more non-title fight wins, of which seven were by knockout, Macias faced Dommy Ursua on June 15, 1957 in San Francisco, to defend his title for the second time. Macias was dropped in the first round, but he got up and eventually retained his championship with an eleventh round knockout of Ursua.

On November 6 of that year, he faced Alphonse Halimi at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles. Macias lost his belt by a 15 round split decision with scores of 144-141 for Macias and 148-141, 147-138 for Halimi. The fight's decision was controversial as many thought Macías had done enough to win it.

Macías boxed four more times before retiring form boxing in 1959 after outpointing Ernesto Parra over ten rounds in Mexico City. After three years, he made a one fight comeback, knocking out Chocolate Zambrano in the fifth round as part of a charity event on October 13, 1962 in Guadalajara.

After his boxing career was over, Macías dedicated his life to acting, appearing in a number of Mexican telenovelas, most notably 1990's "Mi Pequeña Soledad" ("My Small Soledad"), alongside Verónica Castro, who would years later confess to him on one of her variety shows that she grew up as a fan of Macias.

After his participation in "Mi Pequeña Soledad", Macías has almost exclusively dedicated himself to training boxers in a Mexico City gym. He compiled a professional boxing record of 41 wins and 2 losses, with 25 wins by knockout.

Professional record[edit]

41 Wins (25 knockouts, 16 decisions), 2 Losses, 0 Draws
Res. Record Opponent Type Round Date Location Notes
Win 41-2 Mexico Chocolate Zambrano TKO 5 (8) 1962-10-13 Mexico Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Win 40-2 Mexico Ernesto Parra UD 10 1959-02-28 Mexico Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 39-2 United States Carmen Iacobucci KO 2 (10) 1959-02-08 Mexico Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico
Win 38-2 Mexico Luis Trejo KO 8 (10) 1959-01-25 Mexico Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico
Win 37-2 Mexico Kid Irapuato UD 10 1958-11-10 Mexico Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico
Loss 36-2 France Alphonse Halimi SD 15 1957-11-06 United States Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, California, United States Lost WBA World bantamweight title
Win 36-1 Mexico Pastor Gonzalez KO 5 (10) 1957-09-07 Mexico Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico
Win 35-1 Philippines Dommy Ursua TKO 11 (15) 1957-06-15 United StatesCow Palace, Daly City, California, United States Retained WBA World bantamweight title
Win 34-1 Spain Juan Cardenas KO 6 (10) 1957-02-10 MexicoArena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 33-1 Tunisia Gaetano Annaloro UD 10 1956-11-21 United States San Antonio, Texas, United States
Win 32-1 United States Johnny Hand KO 1 (10) 1956-11-13 United States El Paso, Texas, United States
Win 31-1 Mexico Ramon Young KO 2 (10) 1956-11-03 Mexico Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, Mexico
Win 30-1 Mexico Hector Ceballos KO 4 (10) 1956-10-27 Mexico Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
Win 29-1 Philippines Larry Bataan KO 6 (10) 1956-09-05 United States Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, United States
Win 28-1 Philippines Tanny Campo UD 10 1956-06-30 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 27-1 Mexico Adrian Kiriz KO 3 (10) 1956-05-26 Mexico Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico
Win 26-1 Mexico Mike Hernandez KO 4 (10) 1956-04-21 Mexico Merida, Yucatán, Mexico
Win 25-1 Philippines Leo Espinosa KO 10 (15) 1956-03-25 Mexico Plaza Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Retained WBA World bantamweight title
Win 24-1 Mexico Joe Chamaco KO 4 (10) 1956-01-29 Mexico Irapuato, Guanajuato, Mexico
Win 23-1 Mexico Lucio Torres KO 6 (10) 1956-01-15 Mexico Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico
Win 22-1 Mexico Arturo Ruiz TKO 6 (10) 1955-12-11 Mexico Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico
Win 21-1 Mexico Pedro Soto KO 6 (10) 1955-11-21 Mexico Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico
Win 20-1 United States Cecil Schoonmaker UD 10 1955-10-17 United States Memorial Auditorium, Corpus Christi, Texas, United States
Loss 19-1 United States Billy Peacock TKO 3 (10) 1955-06-15 United States Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, United States
Win 19-0 United States Moe Mario TKO 5 (10) 1955-05-12 United States San Antonio, Texas, United States
Win 18-0 Mexico Memo Sanchez KO 6 (10) 1955-04-10 Mexico Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico
Win 17-0 Thailand Chamroen Songkitrat TKO 11 (12) 1955-03-09 United States Cow Palace, Daly City, California, United States Won vacant WBA World bantamweight title
Win 16-0 United States Nate Brooks UD 12 1954-09-26 Mexico Plaza Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Won North American bantamweight title
Win 15-0 Mexico Fili Nava UD 12 1954-05-22 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Retained Mexico bantamweight title
Win 14-0 Mexico Fili Nava UD 12 1954-04-10 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Retained Mexico bantamweight title
Win 13-0 United States Billy Peacock TKO 7 (10) 1954-03-13 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 12-0 Chile Alberto Reyes UD 10 1954-01-16 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 11-0 United States Lalo Gayosso TKO 3 (10) 1953-12-23 Mexico Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 10-0 Chile Alberto Reyes TKO 3 (10) 1953-11-21 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 9-0 Mexico Beto Couary UD 12 1953-10-17 Mexico Arena Mexico, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Won Mexico bantamweight title
Win 8-0 Mexico Genaro Serafin UD 10 1953-09-12 Mexico Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 7-0 Mexico Otilio Galvan UD 12 1953-08-01 Mexico Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 6-0 Mexico Trini Ruiz UD 10 1953-05-13 Mexico Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 5-0 Cuba Manuel Armenteros UD 10 1953-04-15 Mexico Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico
Win 4-0 Mexico Giraldo Bacho KO 4 (10) 1953-03-26 Mexico Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
Win 3-0 Mexico Memo Sanchez TKO 5 (10) 1952-12-15 Mexico Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
Win 2-0 Mexico Chucho Tello UD 10 1952-11-22 Mexico Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
Win 1-0 Mexico Chucho Tello UD 10 1952-11-01 Mexico Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico professional debut.

References[edit]

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