Ray Holt

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Raymond M. Holt is a computer designer and businessman in Silicon Valley.

From 1968 to 1970, Ray and his brother Bill Holt were on the Garrett AiResearch's small design team that developed the world's first microprocessor chip set, the 20-bit Central Air Data Computer (CADC), for the F-14 Tomcat.[1] The CADC was never deployed for any other purpose, thereby leaving room for the 4-bit Intel 4004 to become the first commercially produced microprocessor.[1] Holt's story of the design and development of the CADC is presented in a podcast[2] and a Wired article.[1]

Holt was co-founder with Manny Lemas of Microcomputer Associates, Incorporated,[3] later known as Synertek Systems where he designed the Jolt[4] Super Jolt and SYM-1[5] microcomputer cards as well as the first microcomputer pinball game, Lucky Dice, using the Intel 4004. One of Holt's computer boards, the SYM-1, was used in the first two military robots, Robart I[6] and Robart II.[7]

Holt is the founder and as of 2014 president of Mississippi Robotics,[8] a non-profit organization serving rural schools and ministries in Mississippi, teaching a STEM/Robotics curriculum and holding robot competitions twice a year.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sarah Fallon (December 23, 2020). "The Secret History of the First Microprocessor, the F-14, and Me". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2020-12-23.
  2. ^ "Ray Holt and the Origins of the Microchip Computer". theaccidentalengineer.com. Apr 17, 2018. Retrieved 2020-12-29.
  3. ^ old-computers.com museum
  4. ^ "Jolt: OLD-COMPUTERS.COM : The Museum". www.old-computers.com. Retrieved 2020-12-29.
  5. ^ "SYM1: OLD-COMPUTERS.COM : The Museum". www.old-computers.com. Retrieved 2020-12-29.
  6. ^ "Robart I". Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2015-08-06.
  7. ^ "Robart II". Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2015-08-06.
  8. ^ "Mississippi Robotics website". Retrieved 2020-12-23.

External links[edit]