Ray Kappe

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Ray Kappe
Born August 4, 1927[1]
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Nationality American
Occupation Architect
Awards Richard Neutra International Medal for Design Excellence, the California Council/AIA Bernard Maybeck Award for Design Excellence, the Topaz Medal
Practice Kappe Architects Planners
Buildings Benton House[2]
Projects Southern California Institute of Architecture

Ray Kappe (born August 4, 1927)[3] is an American architect and educator. In 1972, he resigned his position as Founding Chair of the Department of Architecture at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona and along with a group of faculty and students, started what eventually came to be known as the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc). In 2003, Kappe began working with LivingHomes to design modular homes.[4])

Kappe is still actively involved in architectural theory and practice, particularly in the areas of sustainability and the prefabrication of residences.

Career[edit]

Ray Kappe was born in Minneapolis as the son of Romanian immigrants. He attended high school in Los Angeles. He studied for a single semester at UCLA in 1945 before being drafted in into the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, where he served as a topographical surveying instructor. After his discharge he attended the University of California, Berkeley, and earned a B.Arch degree in 1951.[1]

Archive[edit]

The Ray Kappe Archive is housed at the Getty Research Institute and contains all of his drawings, models, and papers, offering comprehensive coverage of his long and varied career.[5]

Trivia[edit]

The Showtime series Californication features one of Kappe's projects, the Benton House, as a major plot point in Episode Seven, "Girls Interrupted."[6] The interior of this house is also featured on the CBS series Shark.[7][8]

Another of his projects made two brief appearances in the Sea Hunt episode, "Hit and Run,"[9] as the residence of the episode's villain. This house was also featured in the Home section of the Los Angeles Times, in an article titled, "A Boat, a Bay, and a Happy House." [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Ray Kappe papers, 1954-2007: Biographical/Historical Note". Getty Research Institute Library. Retrieved 4 September 2017. 
  2. ^ "Benton residence, Los Angeles". Retrieved 2007-12-26. 
  3. ^ Michael Webb & Ray Kappe (January 1999). Themes and Variations: House Design: Ray Kappe: Architects/Planners. Books Nippan. p. 9. ISBN 1-86470-007-6. 
  4. ^ Chavez, Julian (20 August 2009). "Architect Ray Kappe". Malibu Magazine. Archived from the original on 2010-12-19. Retrieved 2009-08-20. 
  5. ^ "Ray Kappe papers, 1954-2007". The Getty Research Institute. 
  6. ^ "Girls, Interrupted". Californication. Season 1. Episode 7. 2007-09-24. 
  7. ^ Ray Kappe SCI-Arc Modern Architect Kappe Architects Planners.[1] Kappe+Du Architects. Retrieved on 10 December 2007.
  8. ^ Dunning, Brad. "Site Pacific". www.nytimes.com/2004/04/18/magazine/magazinespecial/18KAPPE.html. NY Times. 
  9. ^ "Hit and Run". Sea Hunt. Season 4. Episode 29. 1961-07-22. 
  10. ^ "A Boat, a Bay, and a Happy House, pp. 8-9". Los Angeles Times Home Magazine. 1958-07-27. 

External links[edit]