Raymond H. Shuey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Raymond H. Shuey
175*223px
Born 1954
Ventura County, California, U.S.

Raymond H. Shuey (born 1954 in Ventura County, California) is an Arizona public servant.

Education and Background[edit]

Shuey holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Public Administration degrees from Arizona State University. In October 1996 Shuey authored an article titled "Using the Internet in local government finance" [1] in GFOA's national journal named Government Finance Review. [2]

Chief Financial Officer of Glendale, Arizona[edit]

In August 1986 Shuey joined the City of Glendale, Arizona as its first financial Controller. In May 2005 Shuey was promoted to the position of Chief Financial Officer (CFO) and Finance Director for the city. In July 2005 the city added the role of City Treasurer to Shuey's duties.[3] He was also a member of the city's Risk Management and Workers' Compensation Trust Fund Board.[4] Since 2006 Shuey served as the city's representative on the Financial Oversight Advisory Committee (FOAC) [5] for Valley Metro, and as the Committee's Vice Chair. In April 2008 he was appointed to be its Chair.[6] On February 27, 2009 Shuey retired as CFO, Finance Director, and City Treasurer after serving the City of Glendale for 22½ years, and Arizona cities in total for over thirty-two consecutive years. His retirement included resignation from the city's Risk Management and Workers' Compensation Trust Fund Board, and his membership in FOAC.

Glendale is the home of the Fiesta Bowl, National Football League (NFL) Arizona Cardinals, National Hockey League (NHL) Phoenix Coyotes, National Lacrosse League (NLL) Arizona Sting, and Super Bowl XLII.

Avondale City Council[edit]

Shuey served as a Councilmember of Avondale, Arizona from September 1995 to May 2005, when he resigned [7] to become CFO for Glendale. He simultaneously gave up his positions with the Board of Directors of the City of Avondale Municipal Development Corporation, and the Maricopa CountyCommunity Services Commission and Community Development Advisory Committee (or CDAC).[8] Shuey served with Mayors Ron Drake, Tom Morales, and Bill Bedoya while a Councilmember.

Avondale city government's first [9] presence on the World Wide Web was through the personal resources of Councilmember Shuey, who in February 1996 developed an unofficial "Welcome to Avondale, Arizona" [10] web page, which he maintained for several years. In June 1997, Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) cited Shuey's web page as an example of "MAG Stakeholders with Internet Sites" in their report titled Electronic Highway Infrastructure Development and Information Services. [11]

Shuey is remembered for naming Avondale Friendship Park, as well as for acquiring funding for parks in the city’s less affluent areas. He was also instrumental in the development of the concept for the Avondale Auto Mall, an idea that he attributed to his observation of similarly designed auto malls along Interstate 10 in California.[12] The auto mall along with other new development contributed strength to the local economy. Money Magazine calculated that job growth in Avondale from 2000 to 2005 was 54.3 percent, the third highest of any city in the country over that time period.[13]

Maricopa County Community Development Advisory Committee[edit]

Shuey served as Chairperson of CDAC from 2004 to 2005. He served as City of Avondale’s representative or as an alternate representative on CDAC from 1998 through 2005, and was appointed Chairperson by his fellow Committee members after serving as Vice Chairperson since September 2001.[14]

Maricopa County Community Services Commission[edit]

Shuey served as Chairperson of the Community Services Commission from 2003 to 2005.[15] He served as City of Avondale’s representative on the Commission from 1998 through 2005.[16]

Western Maricopa Enterprise Zone Commission[edit]

Shuey served as President of the Western Maricopa Enterprise Zone Commission for 2002. He served as City of Avondale’s representative on the Commission from 1996 through 2002.[7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]