Re-Volt

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Re-Volt
Re-Volt Coverart.jpg
Developer(s)Acclaim Studios London
Publisher(s)Acclaim Entertainment
Designer(s)Paul Phippen, Simon Harrison
Platform(s)Microsoft Windows, Nintendo 64, PlayStation, Dreamcast, iOS
Release
Dreamcast
  • NA: 17 December 1999[3]
  • EU: 2 August 2000
Re-Volt Classic
4 October 2012
Genre(s)Racing
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Re-Volt is a racing video game designed by Paul Phippen and Simon Harrison.[4][5] It was developed by Acclaim Studios London and published by Acclaim Entertainment for Microsoft Windows, Nintendo 64, PlayStation and Dreamcast.

The premise of the game involves racing radio-controlled cars around environments like museums, steamships, construction sites and supermarkets. During a race the cars can collect random weapons to use to displace competitors. Cars and tracks were both unlocked through success in the game's tournament modes.

Game modes[edit]

  • Single Race - Allows to race against computer opponents for first place. Completing races associated with a cup unlocks additional cars.

This game mode is available in multiplayer mode for up to four players to race against each other.

  • Championship - Racing in a cup which consists of four races for points. The higher the rank the more points earned. However failing to finish 3rd place or above will cost a try. If all three tries are used, the championship must be restarted. Obtaining first in a cup unlocks additional levels and cars.
  • Time Trial - This game mode lets the player compete for the fastest lap time in any race that is unlocked. Successfully completing the number of races associated with a cup unlocks additional cars as well as reverse, mirror and reverse mirror variations of tracks.
  • Practice - Allows to explore tracks with no time limit or other racers. In addition each track features a star to collect. Collecting each star from a track per cup unlocks additional cars.
  • Stunt Arena - A small arena features 20 stars to collect. The arena features a loop, ramps as well as a half pipe with stars that can only be obtained with higher performing cars. Collecting all 20 stars unlocks a game mode.
  • Battle Tag - A multiplayer only mode that features a star hidden in a battle level. Collecting the star counts down a timer for a player. The first person to have their timer reach 0 is the winner. The game continues until the last person fails to collect the star.
  • Clockwork Carnage - Instead of 8 RC cars racing to the finish, its a 30 wind-up car race to the finish in any of the race levels.[6]

Ports and re-releases[edit]

Car Editor[edit]

In October 1999, Acclaim Entertainment released the Re-Volt Car Editor which allowed players to export and edit, or create new cars for the PC version using 3D studio.[7] The editor was simply discovered in the Acclaim Studios London office and as such was released as an unapproved and unsupported piece of code.[8]

Xbox beta version[edit]

An Xbox version called Re-Volt Live was in development with a very limited beta version distributed to closed beta testers. This stripped-down version of Re-Volt was issued to beta testers of the Xbox Live service prior to the launch of the service on the original Xbox system, but much to the disappointment of fans - a more complete version was never released on the Microsoft console. The full game was cancelled close to being finished. Even though it was not officially released, the full development version is available and can be played on a modified Xbox that is capable of running games from a storage device.[9]

Arcade version[edit]

In September 2004, a modified version of Re-Volt was released for the arcade machines by Tsunami Visual Technologies. This port of the game featured a few changes in gameplay and graphics. It ran on Microsoft Windows 98 and came in two versions: the TsuMo Standard Non-Motion Sit Down Re-Volt and a deluxe model. Similar to the Dreamcast version's Time Trial mode and many other arcade racers, there is a global timer. This version also featured additional tracks, among those the fan-made Venice by Gabor and a new track created by Kurt Arnlund, an ex-Tsunami employee.

Mobile device ports[edit]

In July 2010, WeGo Interactive Co., Ltd., located in Seoul, South Korea, purchased all IP related with Re-Volt, RC Revenge Pro, and RC de Go (developed and owned by Taito), from Toronto-based Throwback Entertainment.[10]

In July 2012, Re-Volt was announced for iOS and Android mobile platforms.[11] Re-Volt was released for iOS as Re-Volt Classic in October.[12] An Android version of the game was released on April 24, 2013 to the Korean T-Store and later to the Play Store.[13]

PC re-release[edit]

On October 3, 2013, the PC version of Re-Volt was re-released through digital distribution on GOG.com.[14] The release was based on the community developed 1.2 Beta patch, with additional support for the original CD tracks as MP3 files. The game was pulled on request from the developers of the 1.2 Beta patch in January 2014 due to a misunderstanding with publishers WeGo Interactive, in which the company used parts of the code written by the community without due consent.[15][16][17]

Legacy[edit]

Although Acclaim Entertainment has been defunct since 2004, fans continued to support and extend the game by producing fan-made vehicles and courses, and by operating multiplayer servers. Fans have created an open-source, cross-platform chat/lobby client called "RV House" that allows players to connect and play online.[18] This platform is directly interconnected to the website "Revolt Race", in which, among other features, a monthly set of tracks is chosen to serve as the base for time trialing. Additionally, more recently the community has set up a Discord channel that serves as the major hub to talk about the game, host, advertise and join races, share content/mods or even help develop new tools and updates for the game - which the latest iteration consists of RVGL, a cross-platform rewrite/port of Re-Volt's source code that runs natively on both Windows and Linux.

While new players may experience a significant learning curve, the community remains active with records of fastest laps and new courses and cars still being added. The fan-base have gone on to maintain the PC version with alpha and beta updates.[19][20] The game was also ported by the fan community to multiple platforms such as Linux, macOS, ODROID,[21] and OpenPandora based on the available source code.[22][20]

Reception[edit]

The PC and Dreamcast versions received favourable reviews, and the Nintendo 64 version and Re-Volt Classic received mixed reviews, while the PlayStation version received unfavourable reviews, according to the review aggregation websites GameRankings and Metacritic.[23][24][25][26][27][28] Mark Clarkson of Computer Gaming World praised the PC version's graphics and environments, and realistic RC-like handling, although he noted that the in-game map editor was poor.[33] Vincent Lopez of IGN praised the same PC version's graphics, the gameplay and interface, but criticised the game's techno music and track editor.[51] Rick Sanchez of NextGen's September 1999 issue called the same PC version "a fun romp, but if it had taken its toy inspiration over the top, this could have been excellent."[55] An issue later, however, Jeremy Willams said, "Those with a bit of patience will find Acclaim's Re-Volt to be a very accurate little R/C simulator, and a rewarding game."[54] Five issues after that second review, Greg Orlando said of the Dreamcast version, "An excellent, albeit lighthearted, racing game, Re-Volt is best experienced with a group."[53] In Japan, where the PlayStation version was ported for release on 6 January 2000, followed by the Dreamcast version on 13 July, Famitsu gave it a score of 30 out of 40 for the latter,[61] and 23 out of 40 for the former.[62]

Nick McElveen of Computer Games Strategy Plus gave the PC version four stars out of five, saying, "Although steering wheels and joysticks work well with Re-Volt, console-racing nostalgists will quickly conclude that a gamepad is the most effective controller. Unfortunately, given Re-Volt's addictive gameplay, this may portend the return from remission of thousands of cases of 'Nintendo thumb.'"[63] Brad Cook of AllGame gave the same PC version three stars out of five, saying, "While Re-Volt is a beauty to look at, it will unfortunately tax any but the biggest and best PCs out there."[64] However, he gave the Dreamcast version two-and-a-half stars out of five, saying, "The developers at Acclaim Studios London probably thought they were on the right track when they decided to make the game adhere to the laws of physics in every mode of play, but they weren't. I would have preferred an Arcade mode that was just for fun and a simulation mode that required better attention to physics. If they could have set the game up that way, it probably could be on its way to classic status right now instead of bargain bin nominee."[65] Scott McCall gave the Nintendo 64 version two stars out of five, saying that it was "missing the most important ingredient of any game: fun. And let's see, the frame rate is terrible, the environments are too large for four measly cars, and pick-ups don't increase the intensity level. The search continues for a spiritual successor to R.C. Pro-Am. Avoid."[66] Christopher Michael Baker also gave the PlayStation version two stars, saying, "It's hard to think of nice things to say about Re-Volt, so I won't strain my brain. It might best be described in one word as revol... no, I won't subject you to that horrible pun. Just take my advice and spend your money on another game."[67]

N64 Magazine gave the Nintendo 64 version 73%.[68] Vicious Sid of GamePro called the same Nintendo 64 version "a nearly unbeatable choice for N64 racing fans."[69][d] However, Uncle Dust said in another review, "With so many other quality and fun racing titles available on the N64, it is definitely a good idea to avoid Re-Volt for N64."[70][e] The same author later said of the Dreamcast version, "While the much improved graphics give you extra incentive to win more races, many gamers will still be turned off by the annoying physics and control. Hardcore R/C fans will love it and Dreamcast owners who are still looking for a solid racer may want to give it a try."[71][f] Air Hendrix, however, said of the PC version, "Overall, Re-Volt is equal parts fun and frustration. If you're a talented twitch gamer with a high tolerance for frustration, give it a try. But poor controls, driving surfaces as slick as your neighborhood bowling alley, and a limited view had me howling in mental agony every time I stepped on the gas."[72][g]

Johnny B. of GameRevolution gave the PC version a B+, saying that it "may have tracks and cars that let you get more air and bounce basketballs, but underneath it's still just a fairly typical arcade racer."[73] Another author of the same website also gave the Dreamcast version a B+, saying that it was "definitely one of those games that racing fans need to pick up. Of course, its difficulty will have gamers with weak hearts running for the hills. But for those of you with the patience to learn, Re-Volt offers a thoroughly enjoyable experience."[74] Kevin Bowen of PlanetDreamcast gave the same Dreamcast version 8.5 out of 10, saying, "Sure, the Dreamcast already has a bunch of racing games, but Re-Volt is unquestionably unique. The difficulty level and somewhat spotty frame rate are really the only significant flaws. It's a solid game with a lot to offer, both in single and multiplayer modes, and in some ways [it] is even better than real R/C racing."[75]

Spanner Spencer of TouchArcade gave Re-Volt Classic three stars out of five, saying, "It's certainly not the most interesting revival we've ever seen, and neither does it forge any new ground in terms of a standalone iOS title. I'd never accuse it of being a bad game — far from it — but it's simply too pedestrian to get remotely excited about (that's a bit of a pun to finish things off, and at no extra charge)."[76]

The PC version sold 16,528 copies in the U.S. during 1999.[77]

The staff of PC Gamer US awarded the same PC version their 1999 "Best Racing Game" prize, and praised it as "an exceptional balance of realism and arcade thrills".[78] It received a special achievement prize for "Sleeper Hit of the Year" from Computer Gaming World, whose staff wrote that it "surprised the hell out of us when it was released this past Fall". The game was also nominated for the magazine "Racing Game of the Year" award, but lost in this category to Need for Speed: High Stakes.[79] It was also nominated for CNET Gamecenter's "Best Arcade Game" award, which went to Rayman 2: The Great Escape.[80]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Three critics of Electronic Gaming Monthly gave the Nintendo 64 version each a score of 6/10, and another one gave it 4.5/10.
  2. ^ In GameFan's viewpoint of the Nintendo 64 version, three critics gave it each a score of 80, 60, and 66.
  3. ^ In GameFan's viewpoint of the PlayStation version, three critics gave it each a score of 48, 50, and 59.
  4. ^ GamePro gave the Nintendo 64 version three 4/5 scores for graphics, control, and overall fun factor, and 4.5/5 for sound in one review.
  5. ^ GamePro gave the Nintendo 64 version two 2/5 scores for graphics and overall fun factor, 3/5 for sound, and 2.5/5 for control in another review.
  6. ^ GamePro gave the Dreamcast version 4/5 for graphics, 3/5 for sound, and two 3.5/5 scores for control and overall fun factor.
  7. ^ GamePro gave the PC version 4.5/5 for graphics, 3.5 for sound, 1.5/5 for control, and 2.5/5 for overall fun factor.

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External links[edit]