Real Madrid CF in international football competitions

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Real Madrid CF in European football
RealM-Shahter15 (1).jpg
Cristiano Ronaldo is the Real Madrid player with the highest goal tally in international competitions, with 114 scored.[1][failed verification]
ClubReal Madrid CF
Most appearanceIker Casillas (162)
Top scorerCristiano Ronaldo (114)
First entry1955–56 European Cup
Latest entry2019–20 UEFA Champions League
Titles
Champions League
Europa League
Super Cup
Intercontinental Cup
FIFA Club World Cup

Real Madrid CF, also known simply as Real Madrid and familiarly as Real, is a professional football club based in Madrid, Spain. The club first participated in a European competition in 1955. The first international cup they took part in was the Latin Cup in which they participated as champions of Spain. The competition lasted from 1949 to 1957 and Real Madrid won two out of eight editions, as well as Barcelona and Milan. Since entering the European Cup, in 1955, the club has competed in every UEFA-organized competition, except the Intertoto Cup.

Real Madrid had the most success in the European Cup, winning the trophy for a record thirteen times. Real was the winner of the inaugural edition of the European Cup and the only club to win the trophy five times in a row (the first five editions).[2] The club has also won the UEFA Cup twice, in 1985 and 1986, the Super Cup four times, in 2002, 2014, 2016 and 2017, the Intercontinental Cup three times, in 1960, 1998 and 2002, and the FIFA Club World Cup four times, in 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2018. Real Madrid, with 26 trophies, is the most successful team in international football. They have also been involved in European football ever since they became the first Spanish club to enter the European Cup in 1955, except for the 1977–78 and 1996–97 seasons.

In the tables (H) denotes home ground, (A) denotes away ground, (N) symbolises neutral ground and (P) penalty shoot-out. The first score is always Real Madrid's.

Latin Cup[edit]

In 1949, the football federations of Spain, Italy, France and Portugal launched their own club competition. European clubs could not afford hefty travel costs so the Copa Latina was staged at the end of every season in a single host country. The competition featured two semi-finals, a third place play-off and a final. As La Liga champions in 1955, Real Madrid represented Spain in the competition. They defeated Belenenses 2–0 in their semi-final at Parc des Princes in Paris, before beating Stade Reims 2–0 in the final at the Parc des Princes. Real Madrid won the 1957 competition at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, defeating Milan in the semi-final and then Benfica 1–0 in the final. After the introduction of the European Cup, the Latin Cup was discontinued and nowadays it is not recognised by UEFA.[3]

Year Round Opposing team Score
1955 Semi-final Portugal Belenenses 2–0 (N)
Final France Stade Reims 2–0 (N)
1957 Semi-final Italy Milan 5–1 (H)
Final Portugal Benfica 1–0 (H)

European Cup / UEFA Champions League[edit]

The European Cup was inaugurated in 1955, with Real Madrid winning the first five editions.[4] However, after winning the trophy five times in a row in the 1950s, and again in 1966, the club had little success until the end of the 1990s, apart from their runner-up place in 1981. Since then, Real Madrid has won the competition seven times, in 1998, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2018 and established itself as one of the strongest sides in European competitions, when measured in UEFA coefficients.[5] Zinedine Zidane took over as manager of Los Blancos in 2016. He won 3 Champions League trophies in a row in 2016, 2017 and 2018. [6]

Season Round Opposition Score
1955–56[7] First round Switzerland Servette 2–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Quarter-final Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 4–0 (H), 0–3 (A)
Semi-final Italy Milan 4–2 (H), 1–2 (A)
Final France Reims 4–3 (N)
1956–57[8] First round Austria Rapid Wien 4–2 (H), 1–3 (A), 2–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Nice 3–0 (H), 3–2 (A)
Semi-final England Manchester United 3–1 (H), 2–2 (A)
Final Italy Fiorentina 2–0 (H)
1957–58[9] First round Belgium Royal Antwerp 2–1 (A), 6–0 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Sevilla 8–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Semi-final Hungary Vasas 4–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
Final Italy Milan 3–2 (N)
1958–59[10] First round Turkey Beşiktaş 2–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Quarter-final Austria Wiener Sportclub 0–0 (A), 7–1 (H)
Semi-final Spain Atlético Madrid 2–1 (H), 0–1 (A), 2–1 (N)
Final France Reims 2–0 (N)
1959–60[11] First round Luxembourg Jeunesse Esch 7–0 (H), 5–2 (A)
Quarter-final France Nice 2–3 (A), 4–0 (H)
Semi-final Spain Barcelona 3–1 (H), 3–1 (A)
Final West Germany Eintracht Frankfurt 7–3 (N)
1960–61[12] First round Spain Barcelona 2–2 (H), 1–2 (A)
1961–62[13] Preliminary round Hungary Vasas 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
First round Denmark Boldklubben 1913 3–0 (A), 9–0 (H)
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 1–0 (A), 0–1 (H), 3–1 (N)
Semi-final Belgium Standard Liège 4–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Final Portugal Benfica 3–5 (N)[14]
1962–63[15] Preliminary round Belgium Anderlecht 3–3 (H), 0–1 (A)
1963–64[16] Preliminary round Scotland Rangers 1–0 (A), 6–0 (H)
First round Romania Dinamo Bucureşti 3–1 (A), 5–3 (H)
Quarter-final Italy Milan 4–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
Semi-final Switzerland Zürich 2–1 (A), 6–0 (H)
Final Italy Internazionale 1–3 (N)
1964–65[17] Preliminary round Denmark Boldklubben 1909 5–2 (A), 4–0 (H)
First round Czechoslovakia Dukla Prague 4–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Quarter-final Portugal Benfica 1–5 (A), 2–1 (H)
1965–66[18] Preliminary round Netherlands Feyenoord 1–2 (A), 5–0 (H)
First round Scotland Kilmarnock 2–2 (A), 5–1 (H)
Quarter-final Belgium Anderlecht 0–1 (A), 4–2 (H)
Semi-final Italy Internazionale 1–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Final Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 2–1 (N)
1966–67[19] Second round West Germany 1860 Munich 0–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Quarter-final Italy Internazionale 0–1 (A), 0–2 (H)
1967–68[20] First round Netherlands Ajax 1–1 (A), 2–1 (H)
Second round Denmark Hvidovre 2–2 (A), 4–1 (H)
Quarter-final Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 3–0 (H), 1–2 (A)
Semi-final England Manchester United 0–1 (A), 3–3 (H)
1968–69[21] First round Cyprus AEL 6–0 (H), 6–0 (A)
Second round Austria Rapid Wien 0–1 (A), 2–1 (H) (a)
1969–70[22] First round Cyprus Olympiakos Nicosia 8–0 (A), 6–1 (H)
Second round Belgium Standard Liège 0–1 (A), 2–3 (H)
1972–73[23] First round Iceland Keflavík 3–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Second round Romania Argeş 1–2 (A), 3–1 (H)
Quarter-final Soviet Union Dynamo Kyiv 0–0 (A), 3–0 (H)
Semi-final Netherlands Ajax 1–2 (A), 0–1 (H)
1975–76[24] First round Romania Dinamo Bucureşti 4–1 (H), 0–1 (A)
Second round England Derby County 1–4 (A), 5–1 (H)
Quarter-final West Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 2–2 (A), 1–1 (H)
Semi-final West Germany Bayern Munich 1–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
1976–77[25] First round Poland Stal Mielec 2–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Second round Belgium Club Brugge 0–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
1978–79[26] First round Luxembourg Progrès Niedercorn 5–0 (H), 7–0 (A)
Second round Switzerland Grasshopper 3–1 (H), 0–2 (A) (a)
1979–80[27] First round Bulgaria Levski Sofia 1–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Second round Portugal Porto 1–2 (A), 1–0 (H) (a)
Quarter-final Scotland Celtic 0–2 (A), 3–0 (H)
Semi-final West Germany Hamburg 2–0 (H), 1–5 (A)
1980–81[28] First round Republic of Ireland Limerick 2–1 (A), 5–1 (H)
Second round Hungary Budapest Honvéd 1–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Quarter-final Soviet Union Spartak Moscow 0–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Italy Internazionale 2–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
Final England Liverpool 0–1 (N)
1986–87[29] First round Switzerland Young Boys 0–1 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Italy Juventus 1–0 (H), 0–1 (A), 3–1 (P)
Quarter-final Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 2–4 (A), 2–0 (H) (a)
Semi-final West Germany Bayern Munich 1–4 (A), 1–0 (H)
1987–88[30] First round Italy Napoli 2–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Second round Portugal Porto 2–1 (H), 2–1 (A)
Quarter-final West Germany Bayern Munich 2–3 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 1–1 (H), 0–0 (A) (a)
1988–89[31] First round Norway Moss 3–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Second round Poland Górnik Zabrze 1–0 (A), 3–2 (H)
Quarter-final Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 1–1 (A), 2–1 (H)
Semi-final Italy Milan 1–1 (H), 0–5 (A)
1989–90[32] First round Luxembourg Spora Luxembourg 3–0 (A), 6–0 (H)
Second round Italy Milan 0–2 (A), 1–0 (H)
1990–91[33] First round Denmark Odense 4–1 (A), 6–0 (H)
Second round Austria Swarovski Tirol 9–1 (H), 2–2 (A)
Quarter-final Soviet Union Spartak Moscow 0–0 (A), 1–3 (H)
1995–96[34] Group D Netherlands Ajax 0–1 (A), 0–2 (H)
Hungary Ferencváros 6–1 (H), 1–1 (A)
Switzerland Grasshopper 2–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 1–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
1997–98[35] Group D Norway Rosenborg 4–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
Greece Olympiacos 5–1 (H), 0–0 (A)
Portugal Porto 2–0 (A), 4–0 (H)
Quarter-final Germany Bayer Leverkusen 1–1 (A), 3–0 (H)
Semi-final Germany Borussia Dortmund 2–0 (H), 0–0 (A)
Final Italy Juventus 1–0 (N)
1998–99[36] Group C Italy Internazionale 2–0 (H), 1–3 (A)
Russia Spartak Moscow 1–2 (A), 2–1 (H)
Austria Sturm Graz 6–1 (H), 5–1 (A)
Quarter-final Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 1–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
1999–2000[37] First group stage
Group E
Norway Molde 4–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Greece Olympiacos 3–3 (A), 3–0 (H)
Portugal Porto 3–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
Second group stage
Group C
Germany Bayern Munich 2–4 (H), 1–4 (A)
Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 2–1 (A), 2–2 (H)
Norway Rosenborg 3–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Quarter-final England Manchester United 0–0 (H), 3–2 (A)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 2–0 (H), 1–2 (A)
Final Spain Valencia 3–0 (N)
2000–01[38] First group stage
Group A
Russia Spartak Moscow 1–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 3–2 (A), 5–3 (H)
Portugal Sporting CP 2–2 (A), 4–0 (H)
Second group stage
Group D
England Leeds United 2–0 (A), 3–2 (H)
Belgium Anderlecht 4–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
Italy Lazio 3–2 (H), 2–2 (A)
Quarter-final Turkey Galatasaray 2–3 (A), 3–0 (H)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 0–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
2001–02[39] First group stage
Group A
Italy Roma 2–1 (A), 1–1 (H)
Russia Lokomotiv Moscow 4–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
Belgium Anderlecht 4–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Second group stage
Group C
Greece Panathinaikos 3–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Czech Republic Sparta Prague 3–2 (A), 3–0 (H)
Portugal Porto 1–0 (H), 2–1 (A)
Quarter-final Germany Bayern Munich 1–2 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Spain Barcelona 2–0 (A), 1–1 (H)
Final Germany Bayer Leverkusen 2–1 (N)
2002–03[40] First group stage
Group C
Italy Roma 3–0 (A), 0–1 (H)
Greece AEK Athens 3–3 (A), 2–2 (H)
Belgium Genk 6–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Second group stage
Group C
Italy Milan 0–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Germany Borussia Dortmund 2–1 (H), 1–1 (A)
Russia Lokomotiv Moscow 2–2 (H), 1–0 (A)
Quarter-final England Manchester United 3–1 (H), 3–4 (A)
Semi-final Italy Juventus 2–1 (H), 1–3 (A)
2003–04[41] Group F Portugal Porto 3–1 (A), 1–1 (H)
France Marseille 4–2 (H), 2–1 (A)
Serbia and Montenegro Partizan 1–0 (H), 0–0 (A)
Round of 16 Germany Bayern Munich 1–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Monaco 4–2 (H), 1–3 (A) (a)
2004–05[42] Third qualifying round Poland Wisła Kraków 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group B Germany Bayer Leverkusen 0–3 (A), 1–1 (H)
Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 1–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Italy Roma 4–2 (H), 3–0 (A)
Round of 16 Italy Juventus 1–0 (H), 0–2 (A) (a.e.t.)
2005–06[43] Group F France Lyon 0–3 (A), 1–1 (H)
Norway Rosenborg 4–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Greece Olympiacos 2–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
Round of 16 England Arsenal 0–1 (H), 0–0 (A)
2006–07[44] Group E France Lyon 0–2 (A), 2–2 (H)
Romania Steaua Bucureşti 4–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 5–1 (H), 2–2 (A)
Round of 16 Germany Bayern Munich 3–2 (H), 1–2 (A) (a)
2007–08[45] Group C Greece Olympiacos 4–2 (H), 0–0 (A)
Germany Werder Bremen 2–1 (H), 2–3 (A)
Italy Lazio 2–2 (A), 3–1 (H)
Round of 16 Italy Roma 1–2 (A), 1–2 (H)
2008–09[46] Group H Belarus BATE Borisov 2–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Russia Zenit St. Petersburg 2–1 (A), 3–0 (H)
Italy Juventus 1–2 (A), 0–2 (H)
Round of 16 England Liverpool 0–1 (H), 0–4 (A)
2009–10[47] Group C Switzerland Zürich 5–2 (A), 1–0 (H)
France Marseille 3–0 (H), 3–1 (A)
Italy Milan 2–3 (H), 1–1 (A)
Round of 16 France Lyon 0–1 (A), 1–1 (H)
2010–11[48] Group G Italy Milan 2–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Netherlands Ajax 2–0 (H), 4–0 (A)
France Auxerre 1–0 (A), 4–0 (H)
Round of 16 France Lyon 1–1 (A), 3–0 (H)
Quarter-final England Tottenham Hotspur 4–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Semi-final Spain Barcelona 0–2 (H), 1–1 (A)
2011–12[49] Group D Croatia Dinamo Zagreb 1–0 (A), 6–2 (H)
Netherlands Ajax 3–0 (H), 3–0 (A)
France Lyon 4–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Round of 16 Russia CSKA Moscow 1–1 (A), 4–1 (H)
Quarter-final Cyprus APOEL 3–0 (A), 5–2 (H)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 1–2 (A), 2–1 (H)
2012–13 Group D England Manchester City 3–2 (H), 1–1 (A)
Netherlands Ajax 4–1 (A), 4–1 (H)
Germany Borussia Dortmund 1–2 (A), 2–2 (H)
Round of 16 England Manchester United 1–1 (H), 2–1 (A)
Quarter-final Turkey Galatasaray 3–0 (H), 2–3 (A)
Semi-final Germany Borussia Dortmund 1–4 (A), 2–0 (H)
2013–14 Group B Turkey Galatasaray 6–1 (A), 4–1 (H)
Denmark Copenhagen 4–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Italy Juventus 2–1 (H), 2–2 (A)
Round of 16 Germany Schalke 04 6–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Quarter-final Germany Borussia Dortmund 3–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 1–0 (H), 4–0 (A)
Final Spain Atlético Madrid 4–1 (N) (a.e.t.)
2014–15 Group B Switzerland Basel 5–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Bulgaria Ludogorets Razgrad 2–1 (A), 4–0 (H)
England Liverpool 3–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Round of 16 Germany Schalke 04 2–0 (A), 3–4 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Atlético Madrid 0–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Semi-final Italy Juventus 1–2 (A), 1–1 (H)
2015–16 Group A Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 4–0 (H), 4–3 (A)
Sweden Malmö FF 2–0 (A), 8–0 (H)
France Paris Saint-Germain 0–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Round of 16 Italy Roma 2–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Quarter-final Germany Wolfsburg 0–2 (A), 3–0 (H)
Semi-final England Manchester City 0–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Final Spain Atlético Madrid 1–1 (N), 5–3 (P)
2016–17 Group F Portugal Sporting CP 2–1 (H), 2–1 (A)
Germany Borussia Dortmund 2–2 (A), 2–2 (H)
Poland Legia Warsaw 5–1 (H), 3–3 (A)
Round of 16 Italy Napoli 3–1 (H), 3–1 (A)
Quarter-final Germany Bayern Munich 2–1 (A), 4–2 (H)
Semi-final Spain Atlético Madrid 3–0 (H), 1–2 (A)
Final Italy Juventus 4–1 (N)
2017–18 Group H England Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 (H), 1–3 (A)
Cyprus APOEL FC 3–0 (H), 6–0 (A)
Germany Borussia Dortmund 3–2 (H), 3–1 (A)
Round of 16 France Paris Saint-Germain 3–1 (H), 2–1 (A)
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 3–0 (A), 1–3 (H)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 2–1 (A), 2–2 (H)
Final England Liverpool 3–1 (N)
2018–19 Group G Italy Roma 3–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Russia CSKA Moscow 0–1 (A), 0–3 (H)
Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 2–1 (H), 5–0 (A)
Round of 16 Netherlands Ajax 2–1 (A), 1–4 (H)
2019–20 Group ?

UEFA Cup Winners' Cup[edit]

The Cup Winners' Cup started in 1960, but it took eleven years until Real Madrid participated for the first time. In their first edition, they lost in the final by Chelsea. In 1975, their second participation, they advanced to the quarter-final, but were beaten by Red Star Belgrade. They lost their second final in this competition in 1983 when they lost by Aberdeen after extra time. They advanced to the quarter-finals in their last participation in 1994, before the tournament was absorbed into the UEFA Cup in 1999. Nowadays this is the only European trophy played by Real Madrid that the club has not won.

Season Round Opposition Score
1970–71[50] First round Malta Hibernians 0–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Austria Wacker Innsbruck 0–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Quarter-final Wales Cardiff City 0–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 0–0 (A), 2–1 (H)
Final England Chelsea 1–1 (N), 1–2 (N)
1974–75[51] First round Iceland Fram 2–0 (A), 6–0 (H)
Second round Austria Austria Wien 3–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Quarter-final Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star 2–0 (H), 0–2 (A), 5–6 (P)
1982–83[52] First round Romania FC Baia Mare 0–0 (A), 5–2 (H)
Second round Hungary Újpest 3–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Quarter-final Italy Internazionale 1–1 (A), 2–1 (H)
Semi-final Austria Austria Wien 2–2 (A), 3–1 (H)
Final Scotland Aberdeen 1–2 (N) (a.e.t.)
1993–94[53] First round Switzerland Lugano 3–0 (H), 3–1 (A)
Second round Austria Wacker Innsbruck 1–1 (A), 3–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Paris Saint-Germain 0–1 (H), 1–1 (A)

UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League[edit]

The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was established on 18 April 1955, two weeks after the European Cup, to promote trade fairs by playing various cities against each other. From 1958 onwards, the organisers reverted to club participation, but the teams still had to come from cities staging trade fairs. Real Madrid never participated in Fairs Cup before it was subsumed into the UEFA Cup in 1971.[54]

The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup is considered to be the forerunner of the UEFA Europa League, but it is not recognized as a UEFA competition. As such, Inter-Cities Fairs Cup wins do not count toward the tally of Europa League wins.[55] This list tallies the Inter–Cities Fairs Cup together with the Europa League tournament. In the UEFA Cup – Europa League, Real Madrid has won the trophy twice in a row, in 1984–85 and in 1985–86.

Season Round Opposition Score
1971–72 First round Switzerland FC Basel 2–1 (A), 2–1 (H)
Second round Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 3–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
1973–74 First round England Ipswich Town 0–1 (A), 0–0 (H)
1981–82 First round Hungary Tatabánya 1–2 (A), 1–0 (H) (a)
Second round East Germany Carl Zeiss Jena 3–2 (H), 0–0 (A)
Third round Austria Rapid Wien 1–0 (A), 0–0 (H)
Quarter-final West Germany Kaiserlautern 3–1 (H), 0–5 (A)
1983–84 First round Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 2–3 (A), 1–1 (H)
1984–85 First round Austria Wacker Innsbruck 5–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
Second round Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia NK Rijeka 1–3 (A), 3–0 (H)
Third round Belgium Anderlecht 0–3 (A), 6–1 (H)
Quarter-final England Tottenham 1–0 (A), 0–0 (H)
Semi-final Italy Internazionale 0–2 (A), 3–0 (H)
Final Hungary Videoton FC 3–0 (A), 0–1 (H)
1985–86 First round Greece AEK Athens 0–1 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Soviet Union Chornomorets Odessa 2–1 (H), 0–0 (A)
Third round West Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 1–5 (A), 4–0 (H) (a)
Quarter-final Switzerland Neuchâtel 3–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
Semi-final Italy Internazionale 1–3 (A), 5–1 (H) (a.e.t.)
Final West Germany 1. FC Köln 5–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
1991–92 First round Czechoslovakia Slovan Bratislava 2–1 (A), 1–1 (H)
Second round Netherlands F.C. Utrecht 3–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Third round Switzerland Neuchâtel 0–1 (A), 4–0 (H)
Quarter-final Czechoslovakia Sigma Olomouc 1–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Semi-final Italy Torino 2–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
1992–93 First round Romania FC Timişoara 1–1 (A), 4–0 (H)
Second round Russia Torpedo Moscow 5–2 (H), 2–3 (A)
Third round Netherlands Vitesse Arnhem 1–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Paris Saint-Germain 3–1 (H), 1–4 (A)
1994–95 First round Portugal Sporting CP 1–0 (H), 1–2 (A) (a)
Second round Russia Dynamo Moscow 2–2 (A), 4–0 (H)
Third round Denmark Odense Boldklub 3–2 (A), 0–2 (H)

UEFA Super Cup[edit]

The UEFA Super Cup was inaugurated in 1973 as a way of determining the best team in Europe, by pitting the holders of the European Champion Clubs' Cup against the winners of the Cup Winners' Cup.[56] It is now a competition between the winner of the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League. Real Madrid first participated in the 1998 edition, after they won the 1997–98 UEFA Champions League. They lost 0–1 to Chelsea. Their first trophy came in 2002 after defeating Feyenoord with 3–1. Since then, they have won the European Supercup other three times, in 2014, 2016 and 2017.

Year Opposing team[57] Score Venue
1998 England Chelsea 0–1 Stade Louis II, Monaco
2000 Turkey Galatasaray 1–2 (gg in a.e.t.)
2002 Netherlands Feyenoord 3–1
2014 Spain Sevilla 2–0 Cardiff City Stadium, Cardiff
2016 Spain Sevilla 3–2 (a.e.t.) Lerkendal Stadion, Trondheim
2017 England Manchester United 2–1 Philip II Arena, Skopje
2018 Spain Atlético Madrid 2–4 (a.e.t.) A. Le Coq Arena, Tallinn

Intercontinental Cup / FIFA Club World Cup[edit]

In 1960, UEFA and their South-American equivalent, the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL), created the Intercontinental Cup as a way of determining the best team in the world, by pitting the winners of the European Champions' Cup and the South American Copa Libertadores against each other. In 2000, FIFA launched their international club competition called the FIFA Club World Championship, featuring teams from all of its member associations. In the second edition — renamed the FIFA Club World Cup — in 2005, FIFA took over the Intercontinental Cup, subsuming it into its own competition.[58][59][60]

Real Madrid were invited to the championship in January 2000 in Brazil, by virtue of winning the 1998 Intercontinental Cup the previous season. The club finished fourth overall, after losing the third place play-off on penalties to Mexico's Club Necaxa. They initially qualified for the 2001 tournament, in their native Spain, but the competition was cancelled before it started. They have won the FIFA Club World Cup in 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2018, more than any other club.

Year Competition Round Opposing team Score Venue
1960 Intercontinental Cup Final Uruguay Peñarol 0–0 Estadio Centenario, Montevideo, Uruguay
5–1 Estadio Santiago Bernabéu, Madrid, Spain
1966 Intercontinental Cup Final Uruguay Peñarol 0–2 Estadio Centenario, Montevideo, Uruguay
0–2 Estadio Santiago Bernabéu, Madrid, Spain
1998 Intercontinental Cup Final Brazil Vasco da Gama 2–1 National Stadium, Tokyo, Japan
2000 FIFA Club World Championship Group A Saudi Arabia Al Nassr 3–1 Estádio do Morumbi, São Paulo, Brazil
Brazil Corinthians 2–2
Morocco Raja Casablanca 3–2
Third place play-off Mexico Necaxa 1–1, 3–4 (P) Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2000 Intercontinental Cup Final Argentina Boca Juniors 1–2 National Stadium, Tokyo, Japan
2002 Intercontinental Cup Final Paraguay Olimpia 2–0 International Stadium, Yokohama, Japan
2014 FIFA Club World Cup Semi-final Mexico Cruz Azul 4–0 Stade de Marrakech, Marrakech, Morocco
Final Argentina San Lorenzo 2–0
2016 FIFA Club World Cup Semi-final Mexico América 2–0 International Stadium, Yokohama, Japan
Final Japan Kashima Antlers 4–2 (a.e.t.)
2017 FIFA Club World Cup Semi-final United Arab Emirates Al-Jazira 2–1 Zayed Sports City Stadium, Abu Dhabi
Final Brazil Grêmio 1–0
2018 FIFA Club World Cup Semi-final Japan Kashima Antlers 3–1 Zayed Sports City Stadium, Abu Dhabi
Final United Arab Emirates Al Ain 4–1

Overall record[edit]

Accurate as of 8 May 2019.[61]
Competition Played Won Drew Lost GF GA GD Win%[62]
European Cup/Champions League 431 259 74 98 957 468 +489 060.09
Cup Winners' Cup 31 16 9 6 57 24 +33 051.61
UEFA Cup/Europa League 64 33 10 21 111 75 +36 051.56
Super Cup 7 4 0 3 13 11 +2 057.14
Intercontinental Cup 7 3 1 3 10 8 +2 042.86
Club World Cup 12 10 2 0 31 11 +20 083.33
Total 552 325 96 131 1,179 597 +582 058.88

Legend: GF = Goals For. GA = Goals Against. GD = Goal Difference.

References[edit]

In the UEFA references, access to the specific rounds is achievable by the adjacent table.

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