Rear of the Year

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Rear of the Year
Rear of the Year logo.gif
Rear of the Year logo
Awarded forCelebrities considered to have a notable posterior
CountryUnited Kingdom
Presented byRear of the Year Ltd.
First awarded1981 (One off presentation in 1976)
Currently held byAidan Turner and Michelle Keegan
WebsiteOfficial website

Rear of the Year is a light-hearted British award for celebrities who are considered to have a notable posterior. It was created by publicity consultant Anthony Edwards[1] and is organised by Rear of the Year Limited. It was for several years awarded to women only; now it is usually awarded to one woman and one man.

History[edit]

Barbara Windsor won the first award in 1976, presented as a one-off accolade.[citation needed] Five years later it became an annual event with Felicity Kendal taking away the honours.[citation needed] On winning the award in 1985, Lynsey de Paul quipped "I would like to thank the organisers from the heart of my bottom".[2] In 1986, the award was presented to a man for the first time (Michael Barrymore)[citation needed] and 1991 saw Marina Ogilvy, the daughter of Princess Alexandra, became the first royal recipient.[citation needed] From 1997 the awards have been presented annually to both sexes.[citation needed]

The 2002 award to Charlotte Church attracted controversy due to the winner having only just recently turned 16.[3][4][5]

2010 winner Fiona Bruce accepted the award and participated in a photoshoot, happily posing for pictures in tight jeans. However, she subsequently described the award as 'the most hypocritical, ridiculous, ludicrous thing I’ve ever done'[6]

The event, staged for some years at London's Dorchester Hotel in Park Lane, attracts national and international press publicity.[citation needed] In 2012, organiser Tony Edwards declared that female rears were starting to slim down as more women took to the gym, jogging, and keeping trim in this Olympic year.[citation needed]

In 2014, Carol Vorderman became the first person to receive the award for a second time.[citation needed]

Winners[edit]

[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-10-05. Retrieved 2009-10-17.
  2. ^ "Lynsey de Paul - obituary". Telegraph. Retrieved 2017-04-26.
  3. ^ "Rear of the Year Award for Charlotte Church, 16, Is Flattering but Distasteful; TEENAGERS: `When a Child Is Celebrated as Sexy Something Doesn't Smell Quite Right'". Highbeam.com. 2 May 2002. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  4. ^ "BBC News - WALES - Church 'sexually exploited', AM claims". News.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  5. ^ "I do like my bum ..but if I had won Rear of the Year three months ago it would have been seen as sick; AWARD FOR CHARLOTTE, 16. - Free Online Library". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  6. ^ "Fiona Bruce says Rear of the Year award was 'hypocritical and demeaning'". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  7. ^ "Past Winners of Rear Of The Year Competition". Rear Of The Year Limited. Retrieved 25 March 2017.

External links[edit]