Rebecca Rios

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Rebecca Rios
Rebecca Rios by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Minority Leader of the Arizona House of Representatives
Assumed office
January 9, 2017
Preceded by Eric Meyer
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 27th district
Assumed office
January 5, 2015
Serving with Reginald Bolding
Preceded by Norma Muñoz
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 23rd district
In office
January 2005 – January 2011
Preceded by Pete Rios
Succeeded by Steve Smith
Personal details
Born (1967-06-04) June 4, 1967 (age 51)
Tucson, Arizona, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Vandon Jenerette
Education Central Arizona College
Arizona State University, Tempe (BA, MSW)

Rebecca Rios (born June 4, 1967) is an American Democratic politician.

Career[edit]

Rios is a member of the Arizona House of Representatives representing the 27th district and the current Minority Leader. She previously served as Arizona State Senator for District 23 from 2004 to 2010, and served as Minority Whip. In 2010, she was defeated in a state senate election by Steve Smith. She was previously a member of the Arizona House of Representatives from 1995 through 2001.[1]

Rios also serves on the Board of Advisors of Let America Vote, an organization founded by former Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander that aims to end voter suppression.[2]

Political views[edit]

Rios has opposed efforts to add armed and specially trained school personnel to Arizona public schools.[3] She opposes restrictions on abortion rights.[4] Rios has spoken out against an effort led by Louie Gohmert to rename of Cesar Chavez Day to Border Control Day.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Member Page – Rebecca Rios Assistant Minority Leader". Retrieved April 16, 2014.
  2. ^ "Advisors". Let America Vote. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  3. ^ "GOP lawmakers want armed teachers in Arizona school safety plan". KTAR. Associated Press. April 3, 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  4. ^ Noori Farzan, Antonia (March 14, 2018). "Arizona Law Would Require Women to Disclose Why They Want an Abortion". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  5. ^ Estrada, Andrea (March 30, 2018). "Move to change Cesar Chavez Day to Border Control Day spurs anger". KTAR. Retrieved 17 April 2018.

External links[edit]

Arizona House of Representatives
Preceded by
Eric Meyer
Minority Leader of the Arizona House of Representatives
2017–present
Incumbent