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For other uses, see Recruitment (disambiguation).

Recruitment – synonymous with "hiring" in American English – refers to the overall process of attracting, selecting and appointing suitable candidates for jobs (either permanent or temporary) within an organization. Recruitment can also refer to processes involved in choosing individuals for unpaid positions, such as voluntary roles or unpaid trainee roles. Managers, human resource generalists and recruitment specialists may be tasked with carrying out recruitment, but in some cases public-sector employment agencies, commercial recruitment agencies, or specialist search consultancies are used to undertake parts of the process. Internet-based technologies to support all aspects of recruitment have become widespread.


Job analysis[edit]

In situations where multiple new jobs are created and recruited for the first time, or the nature of a job has substantially changed, a job analysis might be undertaken to document the knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) required or sought for the job. From these the relevant information is captured in such documents as job descriptions and job specifications. Often, a company already has job descriptions for existing positions. Where already drawn up, these documents may require review and updating to reflect current requirements. Prior to the recruitment stage, a person specification should be finalized to provide the recruiters with the project's requirements and objectives.[1]


Sourcing is the use of one or more strategies to attract or identify candidates to fill job vacancies. It may involve internal and/or external recruitment advertising, using appropriate media, such as local or national newspapers, specialist recruitment media, professional publications, window advertisements, job centers, or in a variety of ways via the internet.

Alternatively, employers may use recruitment consultancies or agencies to find otherwise scarce candidates—who, in many cases, may be content in their current positions and are not actively looking to move. This initial research for candidates—also called name generation—produces contact information for potential candidates, whom the recruiter can then discreetly contact and screen.[1]

Screening and selection[edit]

Various psychological tests can assess a variety of KSAOs, including literacy. Assessments are also available to measure physical ability. Recruiters and agencies may use applicant tracking systems to filter candidates, along with software tools for psychometric testing and performance-based assessment.[2] In many countries, employers are legally mandated to ensure their screening and selection processes meet equal opportunity and ethical standards.[1]

Employers are likely to recognize the value of candidates who encompass soft skills such as interpersonal or team leadership.[citation needed] Many companies, including multinational organizations and those that recruit from a range of nationalities, are also often concerned about whether candidates fits the prevailing company culture.[3]

Disabled candidates[edit]

The word disability carries few positive connotations for most employers. Research has shown that employer biases tend to improve through first-hand experience and exposure with proper supports for the employee[4] and the employer making the hiring decisions. As for most companies, money and job stability are two of the contributing factors to the productivity of a disabled employee, which in return equates to the growth and success of a business. Hiring disabled workers produce more advantages than disadvantages.[5] Disabled workers are more likely to stay with the company and make their a work a career than most due to the fact that they appreciate having a job and are more stable because they can work at high levels.[citation needed] There is no difference in the daily production of a disabled worker.[1] Given their situation, they are more likely to adapt to their environmental surroundings and acquaint themselves with equipment, enabling them to solve problems and overcome adversity as with other employees. The U.S. IRS grants companies Disabled Access Credit when they meet eligibility criteria.[6]


Internal recruitment (not to be confused with internal recruiters!) refers to the process of a candidate being selected from the existing workforce to take up a new job in the same organization, perhaps as a promotion, or to provide career development opportunity, or to meet a specific or urgent organizational need. Advantages include the organization's familiarity with the employee and their competencies insofar as they are revealed in their current job, and their willingness to trust said employee. It can be quicker and have a lower cost to hire someone internally.[7]

An employee referral program is a system where existing employees recommend prospective candidates for the job offered, and in some organizations if the suggested candidate is hired, the employee receives a cash bonus.[8]

Niche firms tend to focus on building ongoing relationships with their candidates, as the same candidates may be placed many times throughout their careers. Online resources have developed to help find niche recruiters.[9] Niche firms also develop knowledge on specific employment trends within their industry of focus (e.g., the energy industry) and are able to identify demographic shifts such as aging and its impact on the industry.[10]

Social recruiting is the use of social media for recruiting including sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.[11][12] It is a rapidly growing sourcing technique, especially with middle-aged people. On Google+, the fastest-growing age group is 45–54. On Twitter, the expanding generation is people from ages 55–64.[13]

Mobile social recruiting is rapidly expanding. CareerBuilder ran a survey[when?] of the Fortune 500 companies and discovered that 39% of people in the United States uses tablet computers.[citation needed] Another recent survey done by revealed that 43% of candidates research company policy, culture, and history all within the fifteen-minute time period before an interview begins. However, 80% of Fortune 500 companies fail to use mobile-optimized career sites.[13]

Some recruiters work by accepting payments from job seekers, and in return help them to find a job. This is illegal in some countries, such as in the United Kingdom, in which recruiters must not charge candidates for their services (although websites such as LinkedIn may charge for ancillary job-search-related services). Such recruiters often refer to themselves as "personal marketers" and "job application services" rather than as recruiters.[14][15]

See also[edit]

Recruiting companies[edit]


  1. ^ a b c Recruitment and induction, Acas. Accessed 10 May 2015
  2. ^ Teacher's Guide to Performance-Based Learning and Assessment. "What is Performance-Based Learning and Assessment, and Why is it Important", Chapter 1, ISBN 0871202611
  3. ^ Hays Quarterly Report Sharing our recruiting know-how, Nick Deligiannis, April - June 2012
  4. ^ Darling, Peter (Aug 2007). "Disabilities and the Workplace". Business NH Magazine 24 (8): 28. 
  5. ^ N/A. "DISCUSSION: ADVANTAGES, DISADVANTAGES, AND STATISTICS". Valdosta State University. Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  6. ^ N/A. "Tax Benefits for Businesses Who Have Employees with Disabilities". IRS. Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  7. ^ Dan Schawbel (15 August 2012). "The Power Within: Why Internal Recruiting & Hiring Are on the Rise". Time. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  8. ^ Editor (15 July 2015). "What is an employee referral program?". Retrieved 22 July 2015. 
  9. ^ "How to Find Recruiters in Your Niche". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2012-08-03. 
  10. ^
  11. ^ "Social Recruiting and Your Job Search". About. Retrieved 2012-07-18. 
  12. ^ "Atlassian’s social hiring spree pays off". iTnews. 
  13. ^ a b Meister, Jeanne (January 6, 2014). "2014: The Year Social HR Matters". Forbes. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  14. ^ "The Job Application Service".]]. Retrieved 2014-07-30. 
  15. ^ "Online Job Application Submission Services". Retrieved 2014-07-30. 

External links[edit]